Water Bath Canning and Pressure Canning: Explained

Master water bath canning and pressure canning and there'll be nothing you can't can.


| July 14, 2011



Pressure Pot

Don't let a little steam and boiling water scare you. Pressure canning and water bath canning are safe methods to preserve your food. Learn how with this excerpt from the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning.


Photo By Fotolia/James Steidl

If you’re new to canning, deciding between water bath (boiling-water) canning and pressure canning can be a difficult task. Water bath canning seems easier, and works for fruits and pickles, but can’t be used for low-acid foods such as red meat and some vegetables. Pressure canning, on the other hand, can be intimidating to novices, particularly if you’ve heard the old tales of exploding canners. With this helpful excerpt from the United States Department of Agriculture's Complete Guide to Home Canning, you'll learn the difference between pressure canning and water bath canning to decide which is best for you. Use this and our other canning resources to stock up after your harvest.

The following is an excerpt from the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning covering how to can carrots.

Food Acidity and Processing Methods 

Whether food should be processed in a pressure canner or boiling-water canner to control botulinum bacteria depends on the acidity of the food. Acidity may be natural, as in most fruits, or added, as in pickled food. Low-acid canned foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of these bacteria. Acid foods contain enough acid to block their growth, or destroy them more rapidly when heated. The term “pH” is a measure of acidity; the lower its value, the more acid the food. The acidity level in foods can be increased by adding lemon juice, citric acid, or vinegar.

Low-acid foods have pH values higher than 4.6. They include red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, and all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes. Most mixtures of low-acid and acid foods also have pH values above 4.6 unless their recipes include enough lemon juice, citric acid, or vinegar to make them acid foods. Acid foods have a pH of 4.6 or lower. They include fruits, pickles, sauerkraut, jams, jellies, marmalades, and fruit butters.


robhan
7/10/2014 3:25:57 AM

I like steamed foods. They are very delicious and nutritious. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uypd-1NetBo


robhan
7/10/2014 3:25:04 AM

I like steamed foods. They are very delicious and nutritious. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uypd-1NetBo


veera
6/18/2014 3:51:02 AM

This is really good. It's very helpful in understanding these two methods for preserving food items. http://www.pinterest.com/seodress/rocklin-real-estate-qualified-realtor-in-the-rockl/