In Praise of the Grub Hoe

It doesn't get much respect, but homesteaders should know the grub hoe is an extraordinarily versitile implement.
March/April 1980
http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/grub-hoe-zmaz80mazraw.aspx
The head of a grub hoe has a pick on one side and a flat horizontal blade like an adze on the other.


PHOTO: BRAXTON EIKENBERRY

A grub hoe or "grubber" is a very useful — and seemingly forgotten — farm implement . . . with a double-ended head that's shaped like a pick on one tip and looks like an elongated adze on the other.

I've used mine to dig rows for planting seeds, potatoes, and the like . . . and to remove rocks, old tree stumps, half-buried fences, and whatever else gets in the way. In fact, I've even known folks to use a grubber to open cans of motor oil (though that task requires a delicate touch).

If you can't find a grub hoe in your local hardware store, don't despair. There are a few outfits that still stock 'em. The Cumberland General Store in Tennessee, for instance, has a great "dream book" of a catalog, which lists grub hoes along with a lot of other useful items.

However, if you want to save money, you can probably locate a second-hand tool. I bought mine for $3.00 from an antique store . . . and pocketed a $7.00 saving over the average $10 price tag for a new implement. I've seen other grubbers (some in excellent condition) be auctioned off for even less than I spent, too!

All in all, the grubber is a darn handy tool ... I'd sure hate to do without mine!