Edible Mint for Your Garden

Add mint to your edible landscape — don’t fear it, but embrace its varieties and medicinal properties. Here’s a guide to growing mint, plus a mint tea recipe and mint wine recipe.


| March 8, 2013



Eat Your Yard

In “Eat Your Yard! Edible Trees, Shrubs, Vines, Herbs and Flowers for Your Landscape,” author Nan K. Chase shares her first-hand experience with gardening, landscaping ideas and special culinary uses for fruit trees. Recipes for edible garden plants include the crabapple and quince, nut trees, such as the chestnut and almond, and herbs and vines like the bay, grape, lavender, mint, and thyme. She instructs how to harvest pawpaw, persimmon, and other wildflowers for your meal as well as figs, kumquats, olives and other favorites.


Cover Courtesy Gibbs Smith

Eat Your Yard! (Gibbs Smith, 2010) has information on 35 edible plants that offer the best of both landscape and culinary uses. Edible garden plants provide spring blossoms, colorful fruit and flowers, lush greenery, fall foliage, and beautiful structure, but they also offer fruits, nuts, and seeds that you can eat, cook, and preserve. 

Buy this book in the MOTHER EARTH NEWS store: Eat Your Yard! 

Read more from Eat Your Yard! 
Edible Roses: Beautiful and Delicious Garden Features
Growing Hazelnuts in the Garden 

Eating Mint from Your Garden

Don’t plant mint! It takes over the garden.

That’s an all-too-common reaction, and it’s true that some mint varieties can run wild if given the right soil, mois­ture, and sunlight, but no discipline.

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7/29/2014 11:04:10 PM

mint leaves were strewn over the floors to freshen the air as people walked.mint leaves were strewn over the floors to freshen the air as people walked. Read more: http://www.timefourtime.com/






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