Growing Seeds of Your Own for Vegetables

No matter what the experts say, growing seeds—your own viable, true-to-type vegetable seeds—is indeed something you can do in your own backyard if you know the right techniques.



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Done properly, growing seeds for your own use may produce a lot more than you actually can use.
PHOTO: DOUG MILLER
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Diagram shows assorted methods of caging a vegetable plant to prevent cross-pollination.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
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Cutaway diagram of a flow shows all the parts, male and female, involved in propagating seeds.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
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As long as the temperature and humidity are within acceptable limits, it's OK to store seeds in a pantry or basement with your other food.
DOUG MILLER
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A male squash blossom with the petals removed to expose its anthers.
DOUG MILLER
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A male squash blossom.
DOUG MILLER
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A closed female squash blossom.
DOUG MILLER
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Hand pollinating a squash.
DOUG MILLER
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A pollinated and closed female squash blossom.
DOUG MILLER
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After hand pollinating a female squash blossom, use a piece of wire to hold it closed.
DOUG MILLER
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Method of winnowing chaff from seeds. 
DOUG MILLER
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A female pepper blossom isolated within a gelatin capsule.
DOUG MILLER

















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