Cruelty Free Products, Chesapeake Bay Fish, and Other News Items

This installment of an ongoing short new items feature includes stories about cruelty-free products and the disappearance of Chesapeake Bay fish.


| March/April 1983



Chesapeake Bay fish - small perch in fisherman's hand

Overfishing and pollution have contributed to a sharp decline in the population of Chesapeake Bay fish.


Photo by Fotolia/tdoes

The following news items were drawn from multiple sources.


Cruelty-Free Products

Beauty Without Cruelty, an organization concerned with the inhumane use of animals for product testing, now has a list of over 40 brands of cosmetics and household cleansers that are considered "cruelty free." The presidents, vice-presidents, managers, or directors of safety for these brands have signed statements that they neither test their products on animals nor send them out for such tests.

Chesapeake Bay Fish Disappearing

Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Sportfishing Association are declaring the Chesapeake Bay in trouble. An EPA report describes widespread accumulations of potentially suffocating (to aquatic life) phosphorus and nitrogen, and extensive buildups of toxic metals and other hazardous substances as well, while the fisherfolk cite the development of foreign markets by U.S. seafood dealers, and the pressures of highly developed commercial ocean harvest techniques, as factors behind the rapidly depleting fish population in the bay.

Tree Communication: Heard Any Good Oaks Lately?

A few issues back, we reported that trees are able to vary the chemical composition of their leaves to defend themselves against insect attacks. Well, further studies on that same subject have revealed that some tree species can "communicate" with each other. Scientists found that trees within 60 meters of infested specimens also changed their leaves, even if they hadn't yet been attacked. It's believed that a chemical acts as a messenger of danger by traveling through the air from one tree to another.

Hospital Medicine Man

A hospital that serves Cherokee Indians living in the mountains of western North Carolina is combining advanced technology with native tradition. Hospital administrator Dr. J.T. Garrett is also an apprentice medicine man. And along with the latest in diagnostic equipment, the facility has a "Traditional Medicine Man Room" where groups meet to discuss such things as herbs used in the community and the implementation of traditional practices in the hospital routine.

Alcohol Additives

According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, over one million people are allergic to substances commonly added to beer, wine, and liquor. Because the law does not require that ingredients be printed on alcoholic-beverage labels, most consumers don't know, for example, which wines contain such additives as sulfur dioxide and which liqueurs contain coffee whiteners. However, CSPI has a new book, Chemical Additives in Booze, which lists the ingredients in many brand-name beverages.





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