Bits and Pieces: England's Fox Hunters, Stock-Up on Canning Supplies, and Water Demands in the West

This short series of reports includes news on England's fox hunters, stock-up on canning supplies, and demands for water in the West.


| May/June 1975



Stocking up on canning supplies

Short reports on homestead news.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/LARISAP

MERRIE OLDE ENGLAND AIN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE and the gluttonous spread of "civilization" is putting a definite damper on the traditional "country squire" way of life. Fox hunters, for example, have had a dastardly time keeping their traditional prey out of freeways, residential areas, shopping centers, and crop-planted agribiz land. As a result, a pack of fifty baying foxhounds and a whole slew of galloping, tally-ho-ing riders recently chased Andrew Baird — a company executive executive turned modern-day substitute "fox" — through the dwindling fields and forests near London for a full three and a half hours. Has it really come to this?

OUR ECONOMIC CAN OF WORMS IS A BOON TO SOME BUSINESSES ... one of which is Ivan Rayworth Jr.'s Worm .. Ranch in Torrance, California. Rayworth maintains a breeding stock of no less than 24,300,000 of the squiggly creatures, and says his sales are getting better as the economy gets worse. Why? Because there are plenty of unemployed folks with enough time to go fishing these days … and lots more people are gardening — and using worms to improve their soil — than ever before. Hmmm … could there be a market for the little rascals in your area?

NEARLY NINE MILLION ACRES OF UNFARMED LAND was indiscriminately plowed up last year by American agribusiness … all, apparently, in the name of "relieving" the world food shortage. The Soil Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture estimates that less than half of the newly tilled acreage is being farmed with adequate erosion controls, and that — as a result — 60 million tons of topsoil were irreversibly lost from virgin land in 1974.

"THOSE BLASTED WATER HYACINTHS" that plague Southern States by clogging boatways and snagging fishermen's favorite lures may prove to be one of the most efficient water pollutant filters known. Studies show that two and one-half acres of the rapid-growth plants can remove considerable amounts of cadmium, nickel, carbolic acid, nitrogen, and phosphate at relatively fast rate … and when harvested, can be processed to produce 2.5 million cubic feet of usable bio-gas.

THE DIXIE SEAFOOD INDUSTRY IS SINKING FAST according to a recent article in The National Fisherman. Skyrocketing fuel costs — and inflation in general — have put such a pinch on profits that employers are unable to raise wages in line with the cost of living. As a result, hundreds of workers are quitting their jobs and signing up for a higher-paying occupation: welfare

DEMANDS FOR WATER IN THE WEST are getting out of hand as all kinds of energy-development schemes for the area — coal liquefaction, nuclear power plants, shale oil extraction, hydroelectric production, and a bevy of other "solutions" to the energy crisis — are "running dry" for lack of the quantities of H20 required to pull them off. As a result, private corporations, agribusiness concerns, and the Western States themselves are madly scrambling for water rights, devising intricate plots for diverting rivers from one area to another, and talking of "modifying" the weather to bring more precipitation.





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