A New Endangered Species Reservation, Neem Tree Cures Health and Ecology Problems, and More

An old strip-mine site is donated to protect and repopulate endangered species, country music is found to increase cows' milk output, an Indian tree species may be the answer to issues ranging from reforestation to contraception, and baby boomers turn gardening into an expensive hobby.


| August/September 1992



Neem Tree Branches

The tropical Indian Neem tree promises wide-ranging benefits, including use in reforestation, organic pesticides, oral hygiene, and contraception.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/SARAH BANDUKWALA

A New Reservation for Endangered Species

Yeah, yeah…everybody talks about helping endangered species, but it seems like today's plans are nothing but unrealistic pipe dreams. How about taking a piece of land and devoting it entirely to the preservation and breeding of endangered species?

Consider it done. And consider it a gift—a $2.7 million gift. The Ohio Power Company and American Electric Power presented 9,154 acres of beautifully reclaimed strip-mine land to the Wilds, an international, non-profit membership organization which is committed to preserving natural diversity. The Wilds happily accepted the land and converted it into the largest wild-animal complex in North America. Quite a gift.

Apparently, there's quite a guest-list as well: the North American red wolf, who used to be popular until humans moved in and destroyed much of their South Eastern habitat; the African Hartmann Mountain zebra, the rarest species of zebra, is attending as well. Just 25 years ago, 100,000 of these zebras were running around—now there are 6000.

The Asian Wild Horse always makes for interesting conversation, as it is the animal most closely associated with the caveman of Central Europe and Asia (from more than 25,000 years ago). In 1945, there were 31 left in the world. However, a zoological association stepped in and bred the horses, increasing the number to 800. Sadly, the lists of invites to the Wilds continues to grow.

Among the many sponsors of the Wilds is Bonne Bell, a leading cosmetic and skin-care-products manufacturer. If this company goes ahead with their future campaign plan, you'll be able to see photos of the reservation in upcoming ads. [Editor's note: The Wilds now offers educational tours, and is open daily from May through September, and on weekends in October. Please visit their website for more information.]

Country Music Increases Cows' Milk Output

If you're having trouble getting your cow to produce enough milk, throw a little Garth Brooks or Willie Nelson in your tape player. You'll be dancing with glee, and so will your cow.





dairy goat

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