The Cottage Garden

The traditional English "everyman's" garden—fragrant, beautiful flowers in spontaneous, informal patterns alongside vegetables, herbs, vines, and other plants—is enjoying a well-deserved American revival.



Balloon Flowers
Buds of the balloon flower burst into bloom just as the medicinal echinacea (next photo) start to fade.
SUSAN SIDES
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Pink bergamot and larkspurs bloom first in this border that later will hold coreopsis, blueberries, and bush cherries.
PAT STONE
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Coreopsis, Johnson's blue geraniums, shasta daisies, and nigella bloom side by side in Susan's garden.
PAT STONE
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Susan and daughter Rosie enter their garden gateway.
PHOTO: PAT STONE
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"Walk in," the garden seems to say. "The phone, the housework—everything else can wait."
SUSAN SIDES
Echinacea
Planned successions, as this echinacea's fading succeeded by the blooming of the balloon flower (previous photo), keep color coming all year.
PAT STONE
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Combining fruits and flowers creates functional beauty, as in this collage of blueberries, phlox, coreopsis, and tomatoes.
PAT STONE
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The softness of Lavender Dream roses accentuates the regal beauty of a pink daylily, as the flowers await a soothing bubble bath.
PAT STONE
Mother And Daughter In Garden
Take children into the garden. Loving beauty, they'll soon be able to tell—like Rosie—a mahogany bergamot from a coreopsis.
PAT STONE

















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