Acid Rain Investigations, Too Much Iodine in Milk and Dental Fears Clinic

This short series of reports includes news on homesteaders getting involved in acid rain investigations, levels of iodine too high in milk and a dental fears clinic for those afraid to go to the dentist.


| September/October 1982



Bits and Pieces Acid Rain

The outdoors magazine Sports Afield — in cooperation with a Seattle firm — is making low-cost acid precipitation test kits available to folks who'd like to measure the pH of rain, snow, lakes, rivers, or tap water.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/AZZZIM

News briefs on acid rain investigations, high levels of iodine in milk and a dental fears clinic. 

Acid Rain Investigations, Too Much Iodine in Milk and a Dental Fears Clinic

A SIX-PACK FOR FIDO: A natural-chicken-flavored soft drink for dogs will soon be turning up in groceries across the country. According to its manufacturer, the product, "Arf 'n Arf", is nutritious and has been kennel-tested to assure "universal taste appeal". It's available in six-packs of six-ounce plastic squeeze bottles and, apparently, can be poured over dry dog food or quaffed straight up.

BE AN ACID RAIN SLEUTH: The outdoors magazine Sports Afield — in cooperation with a Seattle firm — is making low-cost acid precipitation test kits available to folks who'd like to measure the pH of rain, snow, lakes, rivers, or tap water. Each package contains two data cards that can be filled in and returned to the magazine so that the information can be tabulated, analyzed, and included in the Sports Afield Acid Rain Survey, which will then be turned over to federal, state, and private research organizations. Furthermore, the cards will be submitted to Congress as proof of public concern over acid precipitation. The kits cost $2.95 apiece (ask for model No. 6545 . . . and add $2.55 postage for one to five kits, or $3.45 for six or more) and can be ordered from Early Winters Acid Rain Test Kit, Dept. TMEN, Seattle, Washington (make checks payable to Early Winters).

CHECKING CHOLESTEROL: A U.S. Department of Agriculture study shows that as much as 13% of the cholesterol in eggs can be reduced if laying hens are fed fiber from such sources as corn, soybeans, alfalfa, sunflowers, rice, and wood shavings. Scientists theorize that the roughage scrapes cells from the villi — the site in a hen's intestines where cholesterol synthesis occurs — thus reducing a bird's overall output of the fatty substance.

DRAWING A FREE BREATH? A New York City publishing company, which recently moved into an elegant new office building, discovered — to its dismay — that the high-rise's ventilating system is shut off at 6:00 p.m. After that time, fresh air costs $45 an hour, and air conditioning is a somewhat hefty $75 per hour.

TOO MUCH IODINE: A Cornell University study of iodine levels in New York state shows that young adult males are getting 5 times, toddlers 6 to 10 times, and infants 10 to 13 times their recommended daily allowance. Milk and dairy products account for one-half to two-thirds of the excess iodine in infant diets, probably as a result of the addition of mineral supplements to cattle feed and the use of iodine-containing chemicals to disinfect udders, milking machines, and holding tanks.





dairy goat

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Aug. 5-6, 2017
Albany, Ore.

Discover a dazzling array of workshops and lectures designed to get you further down the path to independence and self-reliance.

LEARN MORE