Dirty It Up With Herb-Seasoned Condiments


| 10/1/2014 9:25:00 AM


Tags: herbs, healing, Marlene Adelmann, Massachusetts, Herbal Academy of New England,

There are many ways to use herbs in health and healing. As an herbalist, I naturally use a lot of tinctures and teas to address discomforts and ailments (if you have never made a tincture before, you can learn how to here). To a much lesser degree, I use powdered herbs and capsules. Consuming herbs in my diet is perhaps the most enjoyable and constant method of taking in the nutrients and healing constituents that the plant offers. However, it is a little difficult to eat some herbs without a vehicle for transportation.Herb-Seasoned Condiments

Familiar kitchen herbs are a sure bet when it comes to adding flavor and zest to any food preparation, but what about the more bitter wild or cultivated medicinal herbs that also help build immunity and act as antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory agents, just to mention a few of their actions? How do we get these in our diet without throwing them in our hot, simmering soup pots where almost anything can be disguised? Boiling stock pots may leach some of the herbs constituents but may destroy others. For instance, garlic is a wonderful herb, but its most potent healing properties are believed to be in the raw crushed clove, and not in the cooked version. Adding kitchen herbs and medicinal herbs to our condiments, where they serve to flavor our food and help build our health a pinch or a teaspoon at a time is a good way to go instead. Used as a finishing touch, they serve up the herbs in a raw form and retain much of their potency.

To get some of that raw, natural energy from plants we can add them to our salts, peppers, sweeteners, condiments, seeds and grains. While I do not recommend eating loads of salt or sugar (and there are many sugar options besides cane sugar), making a dirty salt or sugar decreases the amount of actual salt or sugar intake and increases the amount of healing herbs and flavor in your diet.

To make a good herb salt, it is best to use a natural salt that is derived from sea-beds or prehistoric salt deposits. Common table salt (sodium chloride) is a highly refined, unnatural product with added stabilizers and synthetic anti-caking agents such as sodium aluminosilicate and other additives. Natural salt like pink Himalayan sea salt is rich in iodine and minerals. When it comes to sweeteners, there are loads of options besides white sugar. They are all sweet, calorie-rich and not so great for our glycemic index, but some are better than others for added nutrients. A few to consider are stevia, barley malt syrup, coconut sugar, date sugar, agave, honey, and maple syrup.

Quinoa, rice, millet, and homemade ground flours are superb vehicles. Flours can be made from almost anything if you have  a food processor, coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle in your kitchen. Stay well away from highly processed, bleached white flour, and try grinding flax seed, nuts such as almond, hazelnut, or pecan, and amaranth seed. Amaranth flour and ground flax are gluten free and can be added to baked goods for added nutrition. And if you havent discovered buckwheat yet, give it a try, this fruit seed is related to rhubarb and is packed with minerals and fiber, and is also gluten free.

Homemade jams (like this easy recipe), mustards, vinegars, chutneys and honey are also a wonderful repository for fresh or dried healing herbs. The advantage of using fresh herbs is that they offer a powerful, untamed punch of potent flavor and healing properties. Take fresh leaves of sage, rosemary, basil or mint and roll them between your thumb and forefinger, smell their aromatic fragrance and taste their unique and individual flavors. Herb flavors are vibrant, sometimes pungent and bitter, but always nicely complicated. The disadvantage of fresh herbs is that they also add moisture, which can lead to mold growth. When using herbs, always dry them thoroughly and keep the finished product in the refrigerator. Drying your herbs before using them in any recipe will greatly diminish the chance of mold.


gordanwilson
10/13/2014 6:30:06 AM

Yes herbs are helpful to get relief from healing. It can be taken in various different ways in our diet. See some more useful ways at http://www.cellublue.com/


gordanwilson
10/13/2014 6:27:33 AM

Yes herbs are helpful to get relief from healing. It can be taken in various different ways in our diet. See some more useful ways at http://www.cellublue.com/




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