Surviving Drought in Your Garden in California or Anywhere


| 2/25/2014 12:32:00 PM


Tags: urban farming, water conservation, drip irrigation, california, HOMEGROWN, Dog Island Farm,

The biggest question garden-loving Californians are asking right now is, “Should I even grow a garden this year with this drought?” It’s a responsible, well-meaning question. I asked it myself a few weeks ago. I went back and forth about it. A garden increases your water use, but at the same time, you don’t want to let all of your hard work die.

And then it dawned on me, as I was driving by agricultural fields being irrigated by overhead spray in the middle of the day: I’m going to be eating food that requires water use anyway.

If I grow it, I can control how much water is used. In fact, I can actually reduce my water use through food consumption if I grow it myself. The LA Times recently had an article about how much water is required to grow certain foods. If you eat meat, goat needs the least amount of water per pound of meat. An apple requires 18 gallons, and an orange requires 13 gallons. That’s quite a bit of water for just one fruit. Potatoes require 119 gallons of water per pound. Yikes.

My guilt of growing a garden subsided a bit. Now it was time to figure out what I can do to reduce my water footprint even more. I hope these tips help you as well.

Know Your Soil

One of the keys to water-wise drought gardening, and gardening in any conditions, is to know what kind of soil you have. If you have raised beds, you most likely have a soil that is high in organic matter and maybe even has a bit of topsoil. If your beds aren’t brand new, you’re going to want to get your soil tested so you know what nutrients you need to add. Plants that are getting enough nutrients are going to be hardier and will weather the drought better. If you plant in the ground like I do, you are also going to want to know the soil’s structure. How much sand, silt, and clay does your soil have? Sandy soil doesn’t hold water very well, while clay soil has a tendency to hold onto water too well.

In addition, you can check out the Web Soil Survey through the USDA (push the green button). This will give you an idea of how deep your soil is, which directly affects how much water it can hold. It will also tell you the water-holding capacity of your soil. For the record, our soil is 20 to 40 inches deep but only holds 4.5 inches of water, which means that if it rained 6 inches, the soil would only be able to hold 4.5 inches, and the remaining 1.5 would run off, or flooding would occur. Also, the water table is more than 80 inches deep, so I can depend on trees being able to access it, as most tree roots only go down 2 to 3 feet.




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