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Homesteading and Livestock

Self-reliance and sustainability in the 21st century.


Small Backyard Chicken Coop from GardenEggs.com

small backyard chicken coop GardenEggs

I’ve been using a small backyard chicken coop, the Back Porch Chicken Coop from GardenEggs.com, for the last several months. It’s housed a cockerel and three pullets that aren’t quite old enough to be laying eggs yet. The bottom of this backyard chicken coop is wire mesh to allow in fresh air. The mesh pattern isn’t quite large enough for droppings to fall through. Adding some wood chips or other bedding makes cleanout easier.

I’ve also used this portable chicken coop to hold two broody hens until they accepted some broiler chicks. (Read Using a Foster Broody Hen to Raise Chicks.) In this situation, I lined the bottom of the coop with feed bags and covered the bags with wood chips. The hens fit nicely behind the roost, so you could easily build a nest into one corner if you want to keep a few laying hens in this coop.

small backyard chicken coop broodies

This small chicken coop is light enough to be moved easily by two people, though it’s not on wheels, and the design concept is simple. If you allow your hens to range during the day, this is a nice little coop for keeping them safe and dry at night.

Photos by Troy Griepentrog

catherine cooper_2
4/16/2010 4:38:29 AM

There is a definite upsurge in the number of city dwellers who are looking for their own fresh and delicious organic eggs by having their own backyard chicken coop. At Backyard Chicken Coop Designs (http://www.backyardchickencoopdesigns.com), we are seeing tremendous interest from our visitors in downloading and building their own chicken coop using easy to follow instructions and blueprints. Our detailed guides include a full materials list and are available with video instructions for the visual learner. For people who are not into DIY projects, there is also the option of purchasing ready-made kits which just need to be assembled. This is, of course a more expensive option than building your own chicken coop.