Recycling Your Waste Water

Reusing home wastewater can be as easy as running a PVC pipe from the home to the garden.

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Do the earth a favor, and recycle your kitchen waste water.

ILLUSTRATION: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF

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It's possible—with very little effort—to recycle all the waste water from your kitchen sink . . . and not send it to a septic tank, cesspool, or municipal treatment center. Here's all you do:

Where your drain pipe leaves the house, couple on a long stretch of PVC (polyvinyl chloride) pipe and simply gravity feed the waste water to wherever it's needed. Our runoff goes directly to a compost heap that's teeming with earthworms, and sometimes it also goes on the ground between our thirsty squash hills. With flexible PVC pipe it goes anywhere we want it to, as long as the area to be watered isn't higher than the sink in our kitchen.

We wash our dishes with a mild, no-phosphate, biodegradable dishwashing liquid, and so far this doesn't seem to have any effect upon either our compost heaps or our vegetables. In fact, the compost which does receive our dishwater (or bathwater . . . it doesn't seem to make any difference) contains a larger population of earthworms than the piles of compost which don't get the waste water.

In addition, birds pick up the small particles of grain which wash through the system . . . and the extra waterings have a beneficial effect upon our garden in the summertime.

We like the above method of recycling our rinse water . . . and so (it appears) does every living thing in our backyard!

dion
12/12/2013 1:45:22 AM

The idea of using the wastewater of home for gardening is a good and practical step. However, I think that wastewater recycling is an entirely different concept from reusing it in the garden. The scenario that you have brought forward is like using wastewater in some good works, which is not recycling at all because recycling cannot complete until you do not control the pH levels with http://cleanawater.com.au/products/ph-control-systems/ and separate it from the harmful chemicals in order to make it reusable. That’s why there is such a great variety in the wastewater recycling industry in every category of product. If one just goes to a sewer pump station, it will be easier to understand what wastewater recycling is all about.


dion
12/12/2013 1:44:34 AM

The idea of using the wastewater of home for gardening is a good and practical step. However, I think that wastewater recycling is an entirely different concept from reusing it in the garden. The scenario that you have brought forward is like using wastewater in some good works, which is not recycling at all because recycling cannot complete until you do not control the pH levels with http://cleanawater.com.au/products/ph-control-systems/ and separate it from the harmful chemicals in order to make it reusable. That’s why there is such a great variety in the wastewater recycling industry in every category of product. If one just goes to a sewer pump station, it will be easier to understand what wastewater recycling is all about.