Raising Turkeys for Meat

Turkeys can be a profitable sideline business as long as special measures are taken to ensure the flock's health.



Turkeys
Raising turkeys requires a few special measures, but can produce a great return on your investment.
PHOTO: FOTOLIA/JOLANA MAYERBERG
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Twelve or 13 turkeys should have a cage at least 10 feet by 12 feet with 12 feet of feed hoppers running along the outside. Roosts should be built in the sheltered end of the cage, using 2-by-4's with wide side as the roosting surface and allowing 14 inches space per bird. Top of roosts should be 20 inches from the wire floor and a space of 24 inches should separate one roost from another. Allow the birds complete access to the floor under the roosts, otherwise you cut their exercise area to the bone. A slanting roof of very heavy roofing paper and three sides of the same material (removed in above photo) should protect the roosting section.
ED ROBINSON
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A turkey pan should be protected by a wire guard. Construction prevents birds from contaminating water and enables you to water birds from outside.
ED ROBINSON
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Ty Long feeding his turkeys. He says feeding lime takes only a few minutes when hoppers are conveniently placed outside cage and adequate to hold a week's supply of feed.
ED ROBINSON

















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