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Homesteading and Livestock

Self-reliance and sustainability in the 21st century.


The Prepared Homestead: Chicken-Heated Greenhouse

 

As a permaculture design consultant and homesteader I am always looking for ways to integrate different elements of the homestead to work together synergistically. Chickens are one of my favorite homestead elements.

They provide so many different and useful functions: entertainment, garden preparation and clean up, tilling of the soil, pest (bugs and mice) control, fertilizer spreading, food forest management, of course eggs and meat, and heat for a greenhouse!

Normally, our layers are either paddock shifted or free ranged throughout the growing season from spring to fall. During the colder months we take a different approach for wintering over our hens. We integrate our greenhouse with chickens and sometimes rabbits.

Since I cannot stand chipping ice, I want a simple system designed to prevent the water from freezing. The chickens generate enough heat to raise the temperature in the greenhouse. During the day, when the sun is shining, the greenhouse benefits from solar gain.

We use the deep bedding method for the floor. We do not muck out the coop but continue to add carbon material, mostly straw. The nitrogen from the manure and carbon from the straw provide the raw material for the microorganisms to do their work. Deep bedding becomes another compost heating element.  This triple combination largely prevents water from freezing.

 

In permaculture, the idea of integrating a greenhouse and chickens is not new. The chickens (and rabbits) expel carbon dioxide which benefits the growing of plants. Winter is a great time to grow some microgreens, lettuces and kale.

Even though chickens do not require heat in the winter they seem to have a higher quality of life and lay better in this setting.

The design for this multi-functional structure is very simple and was made from basic lumber, cattle panels and greenhouse (10 mil plastic) remnants. This greenhouse cost us approximately $300!

We are located in Northern Idaho and our winters get cold but nothing extreme so this basic design works out very well for us. If we were in a very cold climate we would have to make our base greenhouse a cold climate greenhouse where we would insulate the structure except for the south facing side.

Sean and Monica Mitzel homestead with their family on 40 acres and are using permaculture techniques and strategies for the property. The property is a demonstration and education site where they raise dairy goats, sheep, pigs, rabbits, chickens, turkeys and ducks. The Mitzels have planted more than 200 productive trees, and bushes and enjoy wildcrafting, propagating plants, and raising livestock. They enjoy teaching and equipping others towards self-sufficiency through consulting and hosting workshops. To learn more visit them at The Prepared Homestead and read all their MOTHER EARTH NEWS posts here.


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paullad
1/17/2016 1:36:25 PM

I see you have horizontal boards up at the roof. Are those structural? I just built the same GH but not sure how well it will hold up to snow. How is yours holding up?


paullad
1/17/2016 1:33:24 PM

Nice! So once the stench from the chickens gets too bad, you just cover the manure with straw? I've never raised chickens but I assume you keep them penned in from your growing area?


deb
1/13/2016 9:36:42 AM

The greenhouse looks a lot like the one I built with plans from https://www.youtube.com/user/texasprepper2 You can get a pdf file for instructions--easy, minimal skills required, great results. I plan to build a chicken coop and garden shed also.


outlanderz
12/28/2015 11:31:19 AM

a quick update: it is interesting watching the insulative properties of snow in this system. The sun is not out but chicken bodies, deep bedding and snow are now working together to keep it warm and cozy inside. 28 deg outside, 39 inside.