The Old Time Farm Magazine: Pastured Poultry, Jersey Cows and Starting a Quince Orchard

Read articles from old farm magazines that give advice on pastured poultry, jersey cows, starting a quince orchard and hominy and wheat bread recipes.


| March/April 1978



Before you create a pastured poultry on the homestead, ensure the conditions are sanitary.

Before you create a pastured poultry on the homestead, ensure the conditions are sanitary.


Photo by Fotolia/Loyish

These old farm magazines provide advice on on pastured poultry, jersey cows and starting a quince orchard.

Reprinted from The Country Gentleman, copyright 1915, The Curtis Publishing Company.

Old Time Farm Magazine Recipes

Dried Hominy Recipe
Cracked Wheat Bread Recipe

Pastured Poultry and Sanitary Poultry Ranges

More chicks are hatched and reared each succeeding spring and summer. The ever-increasing demand for broilers, breeding birds and pullets for laying pens has created in the poultryman a desire to raise a larger percentage of the chicks hatched, and this has resulted in a realization of the importance of several small points, one of the most important being the condition of the ranges over which the youngsters run. The old idea that chicks will grow successfully anywhere out of doors is laid aside, for now not only are chicks required to grow, but they must grow quickly and continuously. As growing chicks spend most of their time on the range during the late spring and summer it naturally becomes necessary to have that range in such condition that it will tend to produce and maintain the health and vigor of the stock.

The question of what kind of range is of first importance. On many farms the orchard is the first place to be thought of as summer range for the chicks. The writer has used a peach orchard for this purpose with fine results. An abundance of shade is always to be found beneath the fruit trees, while the surface soil of an orchard is always fresh if it is well kept. Some good green crop is always growing in the orchard, which insures against contamination.

It must be admitted that the effect on the chicks is likely to be better than the effect on the fruit trees, but if the chicks are not left on the orchard after the fruit is reaching development there will be little trouble. The writer has found that chicks may be kept on peach-orchard range until they are four months of age before they will do much injury by roosting in the trees at night or by eating the fruit.





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