The Old Time Farm Magazines: Cherry Farming, Mixed Farming and Bee Veils

Read articles from old farm magazines that give advice on cherry farming, mixed farming and bee veils.


| September/October 1975



cherry

Is there profit in cherry farming?  Read these old-time farm magazines to find out.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/GIUSEPPE PORZANI

Cherry Farming

It is claimed that as much as $300 has been made from one acre of cherries. There is probably but little doubt regarding the profit of the cherry tree, but the trouble arises in the labor required in picking. Upon one acre, with the trees 20-by-20 feet apart, one hundred and eight trees can be set, and it would require only about a bushel from each tree in order to realize $300. Cherry trees do not bear every year alike, and so, perhaps, it is not an easy matter to judge of the average income from an orchard of an acre. The price realized also depends upon the kind of cherry. We had a tree of a variety known as Siberian or Oxheart, from which a, few years ago an excellent crop of fruit was harvested. I have no means of knowing the number of quarts of fruit gathered, for the reason that many were used for canning purposes — more than a bushel. Many were given away and some were left for neighbors to pick, and besides we sold enough to come to $6. Assuming that as many more were used and given away, there would have been realized from the tree at least $12, and in the same proportion, in an orchard of 108 trees there would be realized almost $1,300. But that was an exceptional year, and yet shows what might be with success, a market and fair prices.

While a wet soil is objectionable, It Is as necessary that there be a supply of moisture as that there should be a supply of fertilizing material. One of the experiment stations, in referring to experiments and the fact that no results could be traced to the use of fertilizers, says that it was due to the fact that there was not enough water at hand to enable the plants to use the fertility that there was in the soil. The want of sufficient water in mid-summer is evidently a hindrance to the best effects that might be produced.

Small Fowls Make Best Layers

Samuel Coad, Connecticut 

I kept a close record one year of the number of eggs laid by several different pens of fowls. The record was kept from January 1 to March 19. The total number of eggs laid by each pen was as follows: Thirty Plymouth Rock pullets, laid 891 eggs, or equal to 742 for 25 pullets. Twenty-five Leg-horn pullets crossed with Buff Cochins, 790 eggs; 25 Leghorn pullets, 788 eggs; 25 Plymouth Rock hens, 595 eggs; 25 Leghorn hens 586 eggs; 25 black hens crossed with Black Langshans, 482 ,eggs.  

I had 40 black pullets raised from a cross between Black Spanish and Black Langshans. They were fine winter layers. I then bought a Black Langshan cockerel and crossed him with the pullets. Afterward I found out I had made a mistake. The pullets raised from this last cross were large, fine looking birds, but poor layers. The White and Brown Leghorns, full blooded, are good layers all the year round if they have good care. I do not think much of the large breeds for winter layers. It is better to cross them with the smaller breeds, especially with the Brown Leghorn.  

Business Notice

For the Land's Sake — use Bowker's fertilizers. They enrich the earth.  





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