How to Recycle Records for Fun and Profit

Learn how to get started in your own used album music store business, including location, collecting, buying merchandise and pricing.


| January/February 1976



Records

There is no reason to let those old records get covered in dust. Sell them secondhand and make some money.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/ANDREW BROWN

If you enjoy music, I don't have to tell you that records are expensive. Even when you purchase your LP's from a super discount store or one of the big mail-order clubs, the best price you can get, usually, is something like $3.79 for each album you buy.

That's the good part, the part you never see if you live way out in the sticks away from the discount stores. And I'm sure I don't have to list the hassles you have to wade through to get to the bargains offered by the record clubs.

Then, of course, there are a few non-profit cooperatives (which sell new records at next-to-nothing markups) sprinkled around the country. But they're still so few and far between that I doubt if you have one within easy commuting distance.

"No problem," you say. "Our local drugstore has a rack of 'Budget LP's', and I've seen some big names listed on a few of the albums down there. I'm sure it's only a matter of time before the records I really want begin to turn up in the display."

"You're in for a long wait," I answer. "Those 'budget' LP's priced at $2.00 were made to be sold at that price and, almost without exception, are

1. unknown artists doing currently popular songs, or





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