HOMEGROWN Life: An Ode To The Elusive Asparagus


| 5/14/2012 9:45:29 AM


Tags: asparagus, farming, weather, climate change, crops, missouri, st louis, Farm Aid and Homegrown.org,
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Spring is definitely the season of Resurrection on the farm and in the forest. New shoots emerge. Plants are reborn as seeds become sprouts become stalks. Then, right on time, it's here. Spring has sprung. And, holy of holies, asparagus comes with it.

Asparagus is a beautiful little plant that signals a great shift in the annual cycle of birth, growth, maturity, decay and compost. Asparagus prepares us for what is to come. It’s a blend of the wild and the tame. For a handful of weeks in Spring it serves as a signal that winter is gone and freshness is here.

Unfortunately, this cycle has given way to asparagus alongside cream-smothered chicken-breast any time of year. Asparagus is on the shelf of the big box supermarket any time you might have the hankering for a Spring fling. For too many, asparagus is now just another source of nutrients as we battle modernity’s cancers and obesities and diabetes.

At the Root Cellar, though, asparagus is different. We are clinging to the past and trying to usher in a different kind of present all at once. We attempt to celebrate asparagus by placing it on the menu (and in the Missouri Bounty Box weekly produce subscription program) when it arrives. As we grow in size and gather around a bigger table of local-minded, seasonal seekers of authentic food and drink, we start to understand the real limits of supply in the Missouri market. Searching for 200 bunches of Asparagus per week in April/May of 2012 has been an interesting adventure to be sure.

Instead, like much of our lives, in an attempt to coordinate the production, packing, transport and logistics of seasonal Missouri eating, we have been forced to go the “Well, guess we better just do it ourselves route.” This means finding farmers with the space and desire for bedding down asparagus crowns for the long-haul. It means finding growers willing to engage in a marriage-like commitment to perennial plants. It means finding enough souls that believe the Missouri Bounty Box has enough staying power to endure a harvest a few years out.

I am one of those farmers that has taken the asparagus challenge. I purchased 700 asparagus crowns and have many of them planted already. The initial investment is in crown, fertilizer, time, land, tillage, time, water, mulch, hoe and time. So capital and time. The hope is that my family puts in the crowns (and probably twice as many next year) so that we can grow with the Bounty Box, yielding one or two bunches per year per crown for the next 20 years. Jenny (my wife) has already taken to calling it the “boys’ college fund”. Part of that statement is an attempt to get them to keep participating in an ownership sort of way in our new asparagus patch. The other part represents the financial commitment and possible long-term pay-off of planting a perennial food crop that might or might not end up being a good use of time and treasure. We shall see which wolf we feed.




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