Farming Advice: Growing Lemon Trees From Seed, Blue Jean Saddlebags and a Pig Box

Farming advice from MOTHER and her readers, including growing lemon trees from seed, blue jean saddlebags and a pig holding box.


| September/October 1977



Farming advice about growing lemon trees from seed, blue jean saddlebags and a pig holding box.

Farming advice about growing lemon trees from seed, blue jean saddlebags and a pig holding box.


Photo By Fotolia/blue_caterpillar

MOTHER EARTH NEWS readers share their farming advice, fun tips and country folklore, including growing lemon trees from seed, blue jean saddlebags and a pig holding box.


Need a stout scrub brush for a really messy cleanup job? "Use a de-seeded sunflower head!" says Matt Wagner of Amherst, Ohio. "Once all the seeds have been rubbed off, the dried flower makes a surprisingly effective scouring pad . . . and a biodegradable one, too! When you're done scrubbing, you can just toss the used pad into the fireplace, or add it to the compost pile."


Growing lemon trees from seed is easy. "Lemon seeds," writes Mrs. Elizabeth Wester of St. Paul, Minnesota, "will grow into lovely little shrubs if you'll plant them and treat 'em as you would houseplants. Not only that, but the foliage of lemon seedlings makes a good flavoring: Just tie a few leaves up in cheesecloth and drop them into a pot of stewed apples or prunes during the last few minutes they're cooked."


The news from Stuart Slifer (a sheepherder in Dell, Montana) is that an old pair of blue jeans makes a great saddlebag. "Just tie the leg openings shut," says Stuart, "and fill the britches with salt, grain, clothes, or whatever you like, taking care to distribute the load evenly between the two legs. Then fling the pack behind your saddle, and off you go!" No horse? Heft the pack onto your own shoulders!


"I wanted something different to decorate my bathroom wall," writes T. Fancki of Poteet, Texas. "So I covered the entire thing with color comics! It was fun and inexpensive to do . . . and the end result is a wall that's as unique as it is entertaining!"


Got a wire fence gate that's difficult to close? Try the latching apparatus devised by Rick Fletcher of Fort Collins, Colorado: First, find (or make) a "Y"-shaped piece of wood or metal that'll fit over the top of the stationary fencepost . . . then drill a hole through the top of the post, bore a hole through the end of each arm of the fork, and attach the "Y" shaped latch handle to the post with a long bolt.





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