Farming Advice: Herbal Baths, Sunflower Shade and Homemade Mittens

Farming advice from MOTHER's Country Lore columns in 1970-1980, these reader tips include herbal baths, sunflower shade for children, homemade mittens and kid kleaning kapers.


| October/November 2003



Use sunflowers to shade children's play areas.

Use sunflowers to shade children's play areas.


ILLUSTRATION: MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF

MOTHER EARTH NEWS reader tips from 1970-1980 share their farming advice, including herbal baths, sunflowers shade for play areas, mittens from old sweaters and kid kleaning kapers.

Country Lore Readers' Tips to Live By

MOTHER's longest-running department is "Country Lore". To celebrate this 200th issue, here are top Lore farming advice and tips from the 1970's. To make a contribution to future issues, send your tips, with photos if possible, to: "Country Lore;" MOTHER EARTH NEWS, Topeka, KS, or send an email to letters @ motherearthnews.com. We'll pay $25 to $50 for each letter we publish.

Herbal Bath

After a long, dusty day of working in the garden, about all most of us can think of is a good hot bath. "But wait!" says Pat Mestern of Fergus, Ontario, Canada. "Raid your herb border first . . . that is, if you want the most refreshing and sensuous ablutions you've ever enjoyed. Gather a goodly bunch of mint, lemon balm, fruit sage or chamomile. Tie the sprigs together (picking 'em at least 5 inches long makes it easier) and toss the aromatic bundle into your tub under the running water. A marvelous aura of herbs will permeate the steam while you soak and soap . . . especially if you use your bouquet garnish as a gentle sponge." It sounds downright habit-forming, Pat!

September/October 1978

Better Beer Bread

John Palermo of St. Petersburg, Florida, has discovered a surefire recipe for an unusual white bread . . . and it's flavored with beer! Just put 3 cups of self-rising flour into a mixing bowl along with 3 tablespoons of sugar and one can of beer. Mix the ingredients thoroughly, put the dough into a greased pan, and pop it into a 350-degree oven. John warns that you should have plenty of room in your oven because the dough will rise "beyond all imagination."

After about 45 minutes, remove the loaf and brush a well-beaten egg on top of the bread. Place it back into the oven for about 15 more minutes to brown its crust. Wow, what a soft and flavorful treat! (And folks who never touch alcohol needn't worry about this recipe because all the alcohol evaporates away during the baking process.)





dairy goat

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