Cuyler-Warren's Consumer Buying Club Offers Co-op Prices

New York's Cuyler-Warren Consumer Buying Club provides the neighborhood with fresh groceries at co-op prices.


| July/August 1970



Tomatoes from the co-op store

I didn't know how bad conditions were in our neighborhood until, 1968, when I found some mangy-looking fruit surrounded by green flies in a local store. Then a friend and I discovered the wholesale food markets and bought a basket of really good tomatoes.


PHOTO: FOTOLIA/BARBARA DELGADO

Just like light shows and sideburns, the co-op idea is spreading from the alternate culture into straight society. Lynn Sherr reported on the trend in a recent Associated Press story:

"There's a grocery 'store' in a Brooklyn garage which scrimps on brown bags, charges two cents each for egg cartons and sells top quality sirloin for 98 cents a pound."

"At the chain supermarket three blocks away, brown bags and egg cartons are free, but sirloin costs $1.49 a pound."

"The 'store' is the Cuyler-Warren Consumer Buying Club - a food cooperative in a racially mixed area where shoppers claim to save up to 30 per cent a week on meat, eggs, fruit and vegetables."

The syndicated article goes on to say that New York Mayor John Lindsay's Commission on Inflation and Economic Welfare has praised the C-W co-op and recommended that the city encourage and assist similar food buying clubs.

Five housewives, under the direction of Mrs. Kittie Brown, organized the C-W co-op over a year ago in Gowanus, a hardcore poverty section of Brooklyn.





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