Add to My MSN

Best Chicken Photos

Best-Chicken-1.jpg 

(Winner): Captain, a 4-H project rooster. By Todd Elliott, Union Mills, N.C.

Crowing rooster. By Susan Christopher, Santa Margarita, Calif.

Feather-legged Silkie mother with chick. By Bill Bergen, Mohawk, N.Y.

Alexandria with a White Wyandotte hen. By Fayne Sears, Columbia, Conn.

Rooster. By Leon Gin, Farmington, Maine.

White Cochin bantam rooster. By Heather Royce, Frederick, Pa.

Plymouth Barred Rock. By Robin Arnold, Port Clinton, Ohio.

Buff Brahma bantam hens. Gertrude and Little Bit. By Robert Raudenbush, Liberty, N.C.

Sleeping chick. By Marla Gold, Madison, N.C.





Post a comment below.

 

James_106
12/28/2010 6:43:18 AM
I really enjoy reading this kind of news. I was born and raised on a farm and now live in a suburb. I truly do miss the fresh eggs with two and three yokes in the eggs. The happier the hens are the better the eggs are. Have a Happy New Year farmers and may God be with you all.

Cathy_37
12/1/2010 9:23:58 AM
This is a nice and informative website. I enjoy reading your articles.

national poultry-breeding chamber/bulgaria
11/17/2010 9:47:36 AM
congratulations

Jim form Cincinnati
9/7/2010 2:49:41 PM
How do I get my one hen from pecking the others on the head?

David Sutter_2
9/7/2010 12:24:33 PM
I bought 13 chicks in the fall and all but three turned out to be roosters. The roosters became to rough on the hens that I have separated them. Added four more hens recently from someone who decided chickens weren't their thing and now have more than enough eggs for the family. The roosters have been babied since chicks and now want me to hold them every time I am with them. Since they all have names, they will live long lives as pets and I will have three or four roosters on me every time I sit with them. They all have different personalities.

Mick and Jane Baier
8/31/2010 8:43:40 AM
We have about 50 hens. All are free to come and go as they please. We have 23 geese, 9 ducks, 4 turkeys and a few guineas. We don't eat our birds, they are our pets. They lay great tasting eggs with dark golden yolks. Come on out. We're on Hwy 40 West from Lawrence to 300 Road. Follow the sign. 785.887.9909. Hope to see you.

queenb3311
5/5/2010 4:07:22 PM
New to backyard chickens,excited about freash eggs.I got them when they were vary tiny now they look like little teenagers.I want to know is when do they move off the med.food? How do you get your chickens to produce eggs with omegas 3"s? Whats the best food to feed? Do they need oyster shells? Any advice would be great! Thanks

Thérèse
7/25/2009 10:11:38 PM
I have scads of eggs in my fridge that are fine after nearly a year. I do not wash them until they are ready to use (and take them out before cooking them.) The only problem I have encountered is that my refrigerator's temperature can be a bit "wonky," and sometimes (rarely) the yolks look a little curdled. When that happens, I pop the cracked eggs into boiling water and feed to the chooks or finch. The shells go into the compost pile or are added to the tomato plants' soil (they like calcium). My experience is that eggs keep better if they are not washed. I have given them to neighbors and family unwashed, and they last quite a long time.

holly_12
6/3/2009 5:20:58 PM
hi how long does it take for an egg to go bad in the fridge? thanks

Sanford Chicken Lady
2/6/2008 8:49:45 PM
I collect eggs from my chickens and sell them at local farmer's markets and feed stores. I collect them twice a day, morning and late afternoon. It is a healthy practice to wash the "bloom" (natural coating from the hen) from the eggs at collection in water that is approximately 20 degrees warmer than the egg temperature, dry on a towel and refrigerate them immediately. USDA typical time frame is 45 days from collection for freshness if maintained at 40 degrees or less. I don't use detergents when I wash the eggs, but I do use a dedicated scrubbing pad and disinfect it periodically in a much diluted bleach and water solution to help eliminate bacteria and allow it to air dry before use again to evaporate the chlorine. Fresh eggs in the central Florida area are quite a commodity and I can't produce enuf for the demand I've found. They are selling easily at the markets for $3 per dozen, and I put them in brand new clear plastic cartons. DO NOT pack in used cartons if you plan to sell them for several reasons but mostly to reduce the chance of bacteria from reused cartons. Hope that helps!

Sanford Chicken Lady
2/6/2008 8:47:11 PM
I collect eggs from my chickens and sell them at local farmer's markets and feed stores. I collect them twice a day, morning and late afternoon. It is a healthy practice to wash the "bloom" (natural coating from the hen) from the eggs at collection in water that is approximately 20 degrees warmer than the egg temperature, dry on a towel and refrigerate them immediately. USDA typical time frame is 45 days from collection for freshness if maintained at 40 degrees or less. I don't use detergents when I wash the eggs, but I do use a dedicated scrubbing pad and disinfect it periodically in a much diluted bleach and water solution to help eliminate bacteria and allow it to air dry before use again to evaporate the chlorine. Fresh eggs in the central Florida area are quite a commodity and I can't produce enuf for the demand I've found. They are selling easily at the markets for $3 per dozen, and I put them in brand new clear plastic cartons. DO NOT pack in used cartons if you plan to sell them for several reasons but mostly to reduce the chance of bacteria from reused cartons. Hope that helps!

Arhonda Buckalew
2/5/2008 9:17:23 PM
I would like some info on how long backyard chicken eggs keep in the frige. And if I do decide to start selling them for a little of nothing, how much should that nothing be? Arhonda

Annonymous_2
4/4/2007 6:22:42 AM
Pinwheel Farm, Natalya Lowther, Lawrence, KS natalyalowther@hotmail.com 785-979-6786 Pinwheel Farm is a very small, almost urban sustainable farm on the edge of north Lawrence. Our activities vary somewhat from year to year, but we generally raise vegetables; sheep for milk, meat, and wool; and poultry for eggs and meat; these are sold at the farm, at the Downtown Lawrence Farmers' Market, and to local restaurants. Our soil has unique properties which have allowed us to develop methods of growing great vegetables with little or now tillage or irrigation. Waste hay from the sheep is used as mulch/sheet compost in the garden. We also do value-added crafts with our wool- including yarn, felt, and hand-knit products- and make soap. Educating people of all ages and interest levels about sheep, gardening, the environment and sustainable living in general is an important part of our activities, both on-farm and at the market. There is a lot of flexibility in what we do from year to year and the potential for apprentices to take a lot of initiative within the guidelines of our established operation. For the right person or people, sharing the farmhouse is an option. The right situation could evolve into a long-term partnership. Pinwheel Farm is non-smoking, clean, sober, and TV free. We are looking for paid and volunteer apprentices. http://www.eatlocalchallenge.com/2007/03/green_eggs_and_.html

Annonymous_1
4/4/2007 6:22:34 AM
Pinwheel Farm, Natalya Lowther, Lawrence, KS natalyalowther@hotmail.com 785-979-6786 Pinwheel Farm is a very small, almost urban sustainable farm on the edge of north Lawrence. Our activities vary somewhat from year to year, but we generally raise vegetables; sheep for milk, meat, and wool; and poultry for eggs and meat; these are sold at the farm, at the Downtown Lawrence Farmers' Market, and to local restaurants. Our soil has unique properties which have allowed us to develop methods of growing great vegetables with little or now tillage or irrigation. Waste hay from the sheep is used as mulch/sheet compost in the garden. We also do value-added crafts with our wool- including yarn, felt, and hand-knit products- and make soap. Educating people of all ages and interest levels about sheep, gardening, the environment and sustainable living in general is an important part of our activities, both on-farm and at the market. There is a lot of flexibility in what we do from year to year and the potential for apprentices to take a lot of initiative within the guidelines of our established operation. For the right person or people, sharing the farmhouse is an option. The right situation could evolve into a long-term partnership. Pinwheel Farm is non-smoking, clean, sober, and TV free. We are looking for paid and volunteer apprentices. http://www.eatlocalchallenge.com/2007/03/green_eggs_and_.html





Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.