You Can Adopt an Orphan Lamb

This guide explains how to adopt an orphan lamb, including where to purchase lambs, how to feed orphaned lambs, housing for lambs and medical advice.


| January/February 1978



Learn how to adopt an orphan lamb and raise it on the homestead.

Learn how to adopt an orphan lamb and raise it on the homestead.


Photo By Fotolia/Patrik Stedrak

Learn how to adopt an orphan lamb and care for them using this helpful step-by-step guide.

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How to Adopt an Orphan Lamb

As Paula Simmons — author of Raising Sheep the Modern Way says, it's best (from a money-saving and experience-gaining standpoint) to "grow" rather than "buy into" sheep, And certainly one of the easiest, most economical ways to get started with the animals — as Daryl Ann Kyle of Athol, Idaho will tell you — is to "adopt" an orphan. "

Sheep are wonderful animals: They're terrific meat-, wool-, and manure-producers . . . they're easy to tend to (much more so than most barnyard animals) . . . and as self-propelled lawn mowers, they can't be beat. Unfortunately for us homesteaders, however, it can cost quite a bundle at today's prices to start even a small flock of woollies, if you try to buy all your animals at once.

Should you happen to live where there are several nearby flocks of sheep, though, orphan lambs (also called "bums" or "bummers" in our neck of the woods) could just be your ticket to meat, wool, and a flock of your own. Orphan lambs — young'uns whose mothers have either died or rejected them for some reason — crop up now and then in every flock. And — because such animals need more-or-less intensive care in order to survive — shepherds are usually happy to have someone take these special babies off their hands for little or no money. That's where you come in . . . providing — of course — you know in advance how to attend to an orphan's special needs.

When, Where, and How to Obtain Orphan Lambs

Traditionally, lambing occurs between January and March of each year, although out-of-season births are becoming more common. To find a "bummer", consult [1] your county extension agent, [2] farmers who've been in the area for some time, [3] local want ads, [4] a sheep extension specialist at a nearby university, and/or [5] feed-store operators. You might find it useful, also, to place an advertisement in a "pennysaver" or other freely distributed tabloid.

volocibel
11/23/2016 5:16:20 PM

That's nice,I want to adopt one but I have no farm.






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