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Would You Pay $40,000 for the Chevrolet Volt?

5/27/2009 12:48:55 PM

Tags: gas mileage, green transportation, hybrid, volt

The highly anticipated Chevrolet Volt is getting ever closer to the showroom floor. Whether you think of it as an electric car or a plug-in gasoline-electric hybrid, the Volt represents a significant step forward for mass-produced fuel-efficient cars. 

The Volt is different than other hybrids on the roads today in that it uses electricity as the sole means for powering the car; the gasoline engine works only to recharge the car’s lithium-ion battery pack. GM estimates that the Volt will travel up to 40 miles without using a single drop of gasoline, more than enough to cover the average American’s commute to work. Recharge your Volt while at work and you’d then be able to drive home without burning any gasoline. If recharged via a renewable energy source, the car’s power would be entirely emissions-free. 

You can learn more about the Volt in The Volt: An Electric Car That Could Change Everything and Update: The Chevy Volt, the Electric Car of the Future

Last week, GM vice chairman Bob Lutz appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman to talk about the Volt. Letterman recently purchased a Tesla Roadster, an all-electric car that gets more than 200 miles per charge, and previously said that the Volt’s 40-mile capability was “crap.” (You can watch Lutz and Letterman’s exchange below.) 

When asked why GM couldn’t make a car with performance comparable to the Tesla, Lutz replied that GM needs to sell cars at volume, and thus needs to give the Volt a practical price tag. Lutz then said that when the Volt hit dealerships in late 2010, it would cost about $40,000 (the Tesla sells for more than $100,000). 

But the first 200,000 Volts Chevrolet sells will be eligible for a federal tax credit of $7,500, bringing the final price to about $32,500. 

So, what do you think? Would you pay $32,500 to $40,000 on an electric vehicle such as the Volt? What if gas prices rise back up to $4 a gallon, or more? Share your thoughts by posting a comment below.

 





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Randall Robertson_3
6/27/2010 11:48:25 AM
I'm with Altexbird, the entry price is an investment in avoiding fuel usage when I've got my independent home electric company up and running. Charge at home from sources without emissions penalties for the rest of the world. Would I risk, as an early adopter, that technology will drive down battery costs while increasingly their function? Absolutely, pray it is so. I believe we are past "peak oil" and gasoline WILL return to high prices, at which point the early bird will still have wheels rolling.

Al_19
6/23/2010 8:08:59 PM
What I DON'T like about the VOLT is the ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) used to provide the electric charge only (unlike the hybrids that use both the motor and the engine for the drivetrain). Meet the new engine, same as the old engine. An all-fuel generator would make more sense but an ICE means gas, oil and all the filters and parts you are used to buying now. Are you catching on yet? All fuel motors use any kind of fuel and they run at a constant speed to turn a generator. An ICE is used at different RPM because that is how cars were designed once J. Paul Getty got Ford to dump Edison and use the ICE, oh and Getty made a lot of money.

Doug Smith
8/28/2009 11:50:01 AM
Try this one on for size. The government needs you to owe them more, so the government gets its hands into auto companies as "investors", now they can use that to get more money from foreign countries like China!!! Folks we all need to wake the (*&% up and get out of debt and force our government to do the same. One may to do that is to refuse to pay so much for an automobile regardless of what type it is. I like many of you am doing all that I can (without incurring more debt) to reduce my use of fossil fuels. Just think real hard about this: Is it really that important to have that item or are you just trying to be like everyone else (known as Jonsing)? If we all would just cooperate together and say no, then things will change, but we have been so programmed to say yes and I want it now that we cannot see what is really happening to us. There is my $2 (gotta account for inflation) worth.

REBECCA CRIBB
8/17/2009 1:51:28 PM
It's not that I wouldn't pay $40,000 for the Volt...it's that I can't. This price-tag is simply too high for the average American household. Heck, if I could afford a Tesla I'd have one (it doesn't get the promised 200 miles per charge though -- see YouTube "Top Gear" and "Tesla") but I was hoping the Volt would be a viable alternative for America. I have been eagerly awaiting it's release and now, disappointed, I will be forced to stick to my original plan...that is to continue to practice green driving habits. I own a '98 Toyota Camry that I keep maintained and drive a reasonable 55 mph on the highway (drives other people nuts I'm afraid). I'd rather have an electric vehicle hands-down but since I cannot afford one, I will have to do the best with what I do have.

Kris_17
6/10/2009 11:15:04 PM
Noooooo. Even if we could afford it, which we cannot, I would NEVER spend that kind of money on a car, when other car companies either do or will have comparable cars for thousands of dollars less. Our first house cost 59,900. No way would I pay for a car that is darn near the price of my first home!! On general principle, I would not ever buy a GM or Chrysler again(and my fil is a retired GM autoworker, so it is a tightrope to walk ;) ) because of the bail out, but I wouldn't buy another of those brands(and we have both; a family Dodge and my daughter has a Pontiac). I think Ford is headed in the better direction and at a much better price. 40k for a car???

Dan Baumgardner
6/9/2009 2:20:01 PM
Well we can see that some things never change. The old "Greed is good" is alive and well in the auto industry. The government incentive for purchasing one of these green cars is more of an insult and shows their sincerity on saving the planet. Or should I say their insincerity! As well as the recent proposal for fuel efficiency. There are already cars on the road that get 35 mpg. That is laughable and only says to the consumer "business as usual". If Obama really wants to make a difference in the environment have the mpg boosted to 55 or more within the next 5 years. That will have a profound affect on the environment and the auto industry. Might even get them off their collective butts and really go to work.

altexbird
6/4/2009 12:48:33 PM
Most negative comments on here are related to affordability. I can afford one and I would consider buying one. At 32,500 it's not much more than a new Prius. And if you have solar power you'll pay nothing to drive it. I'll have to see what plug in hybrids will cost when they come out. It's likely that gas prices will keep going up and battery costs will keep coming down so 10 yrs down the road you might be happy you bought a Volt.

Lorri
6/3/2009 10:03:03 AM
My question is, when I get to work, is the employer responsible for the electricity used to re-charge my car? I have never seen a recharging station anywhere I go. I do not think businesses would look kindly on me using their electricity to get around! These cars sound good in theory, but once you look at the reality of how the electricity is produced and the cost of recharging, I do not see it as viable.

buddapapa
6/1/2009 10:34:08 AM
It would be cost prohibative at $40k. The product must be affordable to the masses if is to have any chance. To sell will have to range from $12k to $15k other wise you just have vehicle for the upper classes to play with.

pdavison_2
6/1/2009 7:49:32 AM
I might consider buying a green car if it were more affordable....What I don't get is where all this electricity these environmentalists expect to power these cars is going to come from.....No electricity will be generated by oil or coal in this current administration.....Nuclear a clean option is out.....I live in Maine where they have tried to put windmills and now there is concern about health risks associated with living around them, can't dam up a river and solar is not even close to cutting it.....If the environmental movement would be honest with everyone and tell us that we will need to signficiantly alter our lifestypes to reduce the demand for electricity......then maybe I would could see this working....Lastly, what is going to happen to all of these batteries when they do not hold their charge or need to be replaced....How will they be disposed of......

Joloyce
5/31/2009 11:39:09 PM
With a paid off Dodge diesel -purchased 3 yrs old so the depreciationi from the dealership had already bee absorbed by the first owner, ( can convert to bio diesel in the future) $40,000 is way too much. Diesel is not the highly refined fuel gasoline is and much less expensive to produce. It's good for at least another 200K miles before I need another engine so I will save my money and put it to better uses - solar energy for our home would be money better spent than a car that is smaller and can't get the job done that my truck does.

Laura _1
5/31/2009 7:16:52 PM
If I won the lottery- I still would not pay $40,000 for a car! My first choice would be a used Prius. I might get a gas sipper (not guzzler) and convert it to run on alcohol. That is supposed to be a pretty easy conversion. I don't know if biodiesel would be safe for me to be around because of an allergy to Peanut oil. It's used in some fast food chains fryers so waste oil could easily include it.

Barb T
5/31/2009 9:35:59 AM
No I would not pay such a price. Nor do I know anyone that would. I'm currently driving a 2006 HHR. I get 34.1 MPG on the Highway and 27 MPG around the city. It's made well and affordable. Battery operated vehicles are not the way to go. The batteries themselves pose health risks during production. Then what happens when they need to be replaced. Something more for the landfill? We have synthetic oil, how about synthetic gas?

Terry Robb_5
5/31/2009 12:31:41 AM
I would like to know if you could order the volt without the battery pack. I might buy it without the battey pack if they would remove that cost.

John Adams_3
5/31/2009 12:24:16 AM
Yeah... TOO MUCH. I understand that it costs a LOW of money to bring out such a car. But lets face it, even if gas were to stay at $10/gallon, it would take me 4 1/2 years to make up the difference between a new $40,000 Volt and a nice $20,000 Normal Sedan. So, just about the time the batteries need to be changed. Anyway Human caused Global warming is mostly hooey. We are responsible for a whopping 3% of the CO2, which is 3% of the total greenhouse gases (NASA data - the same data that shows the upper atmosphere is cooling). And the Obama white house said that Human-Caused-Global-Warming is not real, in a reply to a report by the EPA. Of course this was probably the BUSH EPA trying to tell the Obama White-House that we really were causing global warming. Thank GOODNESS we all voted for Hope and Change. GM builds trucks, not because they want to destroy the planet, but because they make an insane amount of money from them. Better yet, people want them!

Dave Chmielewski
5/30/2009 9:02:33 PM
I'm a GM retiree (2006). For years I was frustrated because the company refused to see the handwriting on the wall. Worse, my union, the UAW, always stood with GM to fight increasing the cafe standards. Still, I did spend more than 29 years of my life there, and while they did come to see the light late, they did finally come to see that the future is in efficient vehicles that minimally tax the Earth. The least I can do is support them in their new venture, the Volt. And the least that the government can do is tax gasoline enough to make potential customers see that their best interest is in efficiency and a low carbon footprint. And finally, customers need to open their eyes to see that the current low gasoline prices are only temporary in the long run. Put it all together and the price of the Volt and its successors will come down, and a former giant of industry will be great again.

kevin_9
5/30/2009 6:34:43 PM
For me and most people I know $40,000 for a car is out of the question. I always buy well used, over 150,000 miles. have never paid more than $1000 for any of the many, many cars I have owned. only stranded once in 30 years of driving so it works for me. It sounds like a good idea but most of america is poor, or as me and friends call it, upper lower class. $40,000 or even $30,000 is not even in your thoughts.

Bill_60
5/30/2009 5:23:21 PM
I just got home from South Eastern Florida where I was driving my not so new VW beetle which gets 30 mpg highway. This mileage isn't overly impressive, but I have to say that it is probably much better than most of the SUV's, large cars, and 4x4 trucks that were flying by me on Route 95. Interestingly, better than 90% of those vehicles were occupied by driver alone. Based on my observation I would say that there are a lot of folks who would buy a $40,000 electric vehicle, but I'm not one of them. Also had the opportunity to ride the Tri Rail (public transportation train) and noted that more people are utilizing the Tri Rail as compared to a few years back. What I can't understand is that even though ridership has markedly increased, why has the Florida legislation cut funding to the Tri Rail while increasing funding to build highways?

Michael_82
5/29/2009 11:16:48 PM
Yeah, $40,000 is way too much, and figuring the cost of replacing the batteries just about when the payments should end is insult to injury! Ok, the Tesla roadster is over priced, but only because they had to use lap top sized batteries because the proper battery pack design is not legally allowed in the us. The auto makers had 80 MPG Diesel Hybrids shown it the---1996 Fall/Winter issue of Electrifying Times shows the sleek 21st Century style Dodge Intrepid ESX HEV. I just don't trust any of the big auto makers these days as it looks like they allow big oil (The presidents Bush and their friends?) to dictate what they do. If we could, we would buy a Diesel Smart car, but they don't sell them here!

Michael_82
5/29/2009 11:15:55 PM
Yeah, $40,000 is way too much, and figuring the cost of replacing the batteries just about when the payments should end is insult to injury! Ok, the Tesla roadster is over priced, but only because they had to use lap top sized batteries because the proper battery pack design is not legally allowed in the us. The auto makers had 80 MPG Diesel Hybrids shown it the---1996 Fall/Winter issue of Electrifying Times shows the sleek 21st Century style Dodge Intrepid ESX HEV. I just don't trust any of the big auto makers these days as it looks like they allow big oil (The presidents Bush and their friends?) to dictate what they do. If we could, we would buy a Diesel Smart car, but they don't sell them here!

Royce Vines
5/29/2009 9:49:18 PM
G'day, I love the instant torque of electric motors, their inherent balance etcetera, however, how long does it take to re-charge the storage cells? An example might be a taxi-cab that is driven 24 hours a day. When would they re-charge? Fuel Cells provide a partial answer, but storage of Hydrogen is a problem. H can be stored in some metal hydrides, but cost and mass are the problem. The charging/replacement stations proposed by "A Better Life" is a great idea but the infrastructure needs to be in first. It has to be cost effective for the consumer too. No, to me an electric hybrid has one advantage and that is extra performance without the costs involved. I also think that a petrol-electric hybrid would spend most of its time on petrol as the batteries wouldn't hold enough charge for spirited driving. No, I never buy new cars, why lose $9000 as soon as it is driven out of the showroom (Aust. Tax Office allowance)? Let someone else take the hit. Best Regards, Royce R. Vines A little knowledge is a dangerous thing - Googling is far worse!

matt_18
5/29/2009 5:59:56 PM
I find the price very unreasonable. The Norwegian company Th!nk makes an electric car that gets over 100 miles per charge (170,180, or 203 km depending on the battery). Last I heard, they were working toward building a factory here in the US, and were hoping for the price of the car to be around $20,000 or less (base price). If Th!nk can make this car to sell for about $20,000, I have a hard time believing that GM can't.

Rhonda_16
5/29/2009 3:33:58 PM
I wouldn't pay 40,000.00 for ANY car - that is a RIDICULOUS waste of money.

WINTER Star
5/29/2009 2:32:23 PM
There are a number of issues here. Industry's long, effete history makes their newest electric $40K offering rather obscene; industry has repeatedly CHOSEN adverse impacts on lives and environment: "profit over life" Industries, with Gov't blessings, repeatedly destroyed viable solutions, including cars, trolleys and mass transit, and were slow to adopt safety measures. The current offering prevents actual reduction of global warming: --The pricetag alone, prevents millions from adopting better rides to get themselves to work. --It continues to use much the same materials and processes used for petroleum-fueled vehicles. --It is still range-limited, so will still use more energy than it otherwise might be designed to use. --With increased populations and growth/developments in other countries, there will be a net growth in Global Warming, instead of a reduction. Much is at stake. Much needs done to correct complex environmental problems. Lives far beyond those of corporate execs are at stake here. People are not just walking pocket-books. Corporate and Gov't bad habits bleed us all dry. The longer they continue 'business as usual', the faster, deeper and wider corporations hit bankruptcies and pull us all down with them, making recovery that much harder. ALL are part of the economic system that requires proper care and feeding; without that, it will stop working [as we are currently witnessing]. Lacking honesty, integrity, accountability, and inclusive objectivity, the life of the Economy will cease, causing harm to ALL. "It's the trade-off we must suffer due to what's at stake" FAILS to justify a $40K sticker price on a car SUPPOSEDLY a good solution to global warming. That argument fails to address the sheer numbers of people who must commute farther than 40 miles per day, to eke a minuscule living, only affording about $10K or less for any vehicle. "TRICKLE-DOW

Victoria_9
5/29/2009 12:54:33 PM
NO! I would not pay $40,000.00 for a car of ANY kind. I have other more important things to pay for. Also I like SUVs

George Works
5/29/2009 12:03:28 PM
No, I would not pay that much. But I am in the process of converting a Chevy S-10 pickup to electric drive. The electric motor just went into the vehicle, and I expect to be driving it in a few more weeks. My total cost will be a bit over $20,000 including new suspension, new clutch, body repair, new windshield and new paint. So it costs half as much as a Volt, for a looks-like-new electric truck with a top-notch AC electric drive-train. And I didn't burn the approximately 100 barrels of oil equivalent that it takes to manufacture a new car.

vwgary
5/29/2009 12:02:40 PM
Wouldn't pay $40K for any vehicle regardless. One could be made in a home garage for 1/4 the cost. I agree with a previous poster that the car manufacturers are just trying to capitalize on the green movement. From what I've read, the pollution created by the manufacture process of making the batteries alone is far worse than the fossil fueled beasts we drive currently.

Bill Roth_1
5/29/2009 11:50:28 AM
These contraptions will not work out here in West Texas. For a major shopping trip it is 100 miles. I drove 457 miles on Thursday while working.I will pay extra for my comfort if I am going to be in it for 12 hours. I am now 66 years old and not as flexible as I used to be and I sure can not pay $40,000. for something to go to the coffee shop and grocery store in. I guess if you need a sheet of plywood or sheetrock you could strap it on the top. I paid about that last year for my pickup (F-150) but it will do what I need and will still haul six people comfortabally. If they are looking for alternate fuels they need to look at Hydrogen which GM had and scrapped. GM needs to get rid of the tunnel vision and look at other alternatives. Natural gas is cheap and the same technology that has been used for years on butane powered vehicles would take very little tweeking.

Don_29
5/29/2009 11:45:05 AM
NO ..... I think the manufacturers are attempting to upcharge to capitalize on the current "Green" trend.

neosapiens
5/29/2009 10:37:42 AM
Since I know that much bigger issues are at stake, I would pay that much to help bring cleaner cars to market. In fact, I already HAVE. The A123Systems lithium-ion battery in my Prius brings the total cost of my car to $37,000. I realize that not everyone can afford to jump right into bleeding-edge technology, but enough of us have to be willing to do it to give carmakers the chance to work the kinks out and figure out how to make a mass-market version of a clean car. It is a mistake to think of the Volt and cars like that in simple, personal economic terms as transportation: it's really about national security, clean air, clean water and sustainability. When you buy a clean vehicle, you are buying all of those things, not just personal transportation.

PJKutscher
5/29/2009 10:24:41 AM
I wish I had the money to spring for a new car, in which case, the Chevy Volt might be on my radar screen (or a Prius, Civic or other hybrid--maybe a diesel I could convert to veggie oil useage). Right now I'm hoping my 10yr old car (bought used) with 161K+ miles on it lasts another year or so. I think anything in the positive direction of increased fuel efficiency is a good thing. Some will be able to afford it "new" and some will have to wait until there are "used" ones available--same as any new model. Time will tell which models offer real progress and which ones fall off the map. As long as we all can gradually upgrade as we need and can afford to, then we are making progress. We can't all be on the same level at the same time--never have been, never will--that's life.

Taras Romanovich
5/29/2009 10:17:54 AM
I Live in the Detroit area of Oakland County, in 1972 I worked a Union construction job that paid$ 5.00 / hour,about $ 10,000.00 / year I purchased a new top of the line Camaro Z-28 for $ 3,000.00 roughly one third of my yearly pay, I now have a Union construction job that pays $ 50,000.00 / year, to purchase a slimmed down Volt without paying sales tax and license fees it would be over 80% of my pay. Not even considering the outrageous electric rates we soon will be paying, or the fact that the battery needs to be replaced every five years just like your cordless drill at a cost of$5,000-$7.000.00. Lets talk about who's really at fault, " GOVERNMENT ", which has allowed Lawyers to endlessly sue the manufacturers out of existence, Chrysler alone has $750,000,000.00 in litigation against it which lawyers are crying will now not be paid!, endless meddling in standards which the rest of the world ignores, don't we share the same air and water, what makes you think that China, India, Mexico, Brazil, Russia really gives a rat ass, all they really care about is market share and extracting and mining our resources . Yes the tables have turned, America is quickly becoming Great Britain at the turn of the Twentieth century a bloated fat man who no longer fits in his Army uniform. May God help us all ! Taras Romanovich, Detroit P.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, Income in Southeastern Michigan is on average the same as it is on both the left and right coasts of the lower 48, so the argument that higher incomes will allow purchasers more discretionary spending becomes mute !

ALAN JONES_1
5/29/2009 10:07:33 AM
Once again the fine people from GM have sized up their market and completely dorked it up. Cut the price to 25K and we'll talk. Watch who killed the electric car again. This is obviously just lip service to placate Washington until the good old days return. Guess what GM - it ain't gonna happen. Have fun in bankruptcy. Selling cars that are too expensive all the while maintaining that your customers won't like them when they get them isn't a good business model.

Susan_3
5/29/2009 9:21:42 AM
I buy used cars. The financial end of this kind of thing is too crazy. You can earn a heck of a lot of money investing the $25K left over from buying a good used vehicle than pay $40 for a car. I also live about 14 miles from most of my "in-town" errands and a 1800 elevation change. Under those conditions, I'm not sure the Volt would turn out to be as satisfactory as a standard used Toyota of some sort. At $40 K, unless there is a $15-20K tax credit, I really can't see this being more than a novelty for people with more money than brains. Susan/California

JW_4
5/29/2009 9:12:47 AM
$40,000 is outrageous. I will never make up the difference of buying a decent used car versus this new one in fuel costs over purchase price. With the economy in the tank, this car will be a failure. There is also the ongoing EMF controversy. The EMF exposure to the passengers of these vehicles is off the charts. As a former cancer patient, that is enough right there to keep me out of one. Just one more environmental factor bombarding our immune systems. Push comes to shove I will walk.

JW_4
5/29/2009 8:54:32 AM
$40,000 is outrageous. I will never make up the difference of buying a decent used car versus this new one in fuel costs over purchase price. With the economy in the tank, this car will be a failure. There is also the ongoing EMF controversy. The EMF exposure to the passengers of these vehicles is off the charts. As a former cancer patient, that is enough right there to keep me out of one. Just one more environmental factor bombarding our immune systems. Push comes to shove I will walk.

Courtney_8
5/29/2009 8:28:02 AM
The Volt DOESN'T have only a 40 mile range. I found this statement on gm-volt.com/ "The car is being designed to drive at least 40 miles on pure electricity stored in the battery from overnight home charging. After that, the gas engine will kick in (to charge the battery) and allow the car to be driven up to 400 miles on a full tank (6-7 gallons) of gas." So, based on that, if you live less than 20 miles from work, you don't have to use any gas for your commute. And if you're going on a 1000 mile trip, you'll be able to do that using maybe 15 gallons of gas... which is pretty amazing. This car doesn't eliminate using gas all together, but it seems like a good step in the right direction. I agree, the price is a little high for most, but that's the way all new technology is. Think about how much a small flat screen tv or dvd player used to cost. As more people buy them, the cost of vehicle development will be offset, and the price is bound to drop. GM can't just give cars away... especially if they want to survive as a company.

Courtney_8
5/29/2009 8:27:28 AM
The Volt DOESN'T have only a 40 mile range. I found this statement on gm-volt.com/ "The car is being designed to drive at least 40 miles on pure electricity stored in the battery from overnight home charging. After that, the gas engine will kick in (to charge the battery) and allow the car to be driven up to 400 miles on a full tank (6-7 gallons) of gas." So, based on that, if you live less than 20 miles from work, you don't have to use any gas for your commute. And if you're going on a 1000 mile trip, you'll be able to do that using maybe 15 gallons of gas... which is pretty amazing. This car doesn't eliminate using gas all together, but it seems like a good step in the right direction. I agree, the price is a little high for most, but that's the way all new technology is. Think about how much a small flat screen tv or dvd player used to cost. As more people buy them, the cost of vehicle development will be offset, and the price is bound to drop. GM can't just give cars away... especially if they want to survive as a company.

Pat Miketinac
5/28/2009 8:51:25 PM
Of course not. If I went electric, it would be a conversion that I did myself in the spirit of Mother Earth News. I have info already on converting my old aircooled VW's, but am exploring other mods right now For more MPG. Type in "water injection" in the search box at the top of this page for two of Mom's articles tested by staffers. My old aircraft manuals show how this was used in WW2.

MC_2
5/28/2009 11:29:35 AM
A $40K car isn't realistic for us. Heck, a $20K car isn't realistic for us. $10-12K is about the most we can lay down for wheels. Neither, really, is a car with a 40-mile range. It would get DH to work and back whether he could recharge it there or not-- but just barely, and only if he walked or carpooled for lunch or just plain ate at his desk. Those are, of course, things that need to be regular parts of life anyway... ...but I still can't see myself buying a car that's going to be totally useless on our two roughly 1000-mile trips to see family each year. With 3 kids, and just one ticket costing almost as much as the gasoline to make the round trip, mass transit is totally out of the question there unless it becomes much, much cheaper. Again with 3 kids, I also absolutely cannot, under any circumstances, see a 4-seater as a practical vehicle. That was what really cheezed me off about the Volt. OK, I guess the maximum family size being 4 people also needs to become a permanent trend... ...but the kids are here, I'm not killing any of them off, and I'm not buying a car I can't drag all of them around in. Having to take 2 cars to the grocery store cuts the fuel efficiency right in half. So I guess we're sticking with used compacts and keeping them tuned enough to get around 35 mpg.

Janet_36
5/27/2009 6:51:13 PM
Sure I would pay it. The question is can I pay it? Who has $40,000 to buy a car? I've never owned anything but a used car in my life because that's all I can afford. Maybe I'm dirt poor and just don't realize it, but I think not. I see everyone around me, neighbors, friends, family, coworkers none of them could a $40,000 car either. Maybe salaries are more in other parts of the country, but here in the midwest, thats alot of money! The other question I have about the article, you said "charge it up while you are at work". What place of business is going to provide outdoor receptcles and boot the electricity for thier employees to charge up thier cars? Maybe one or two employees ok...but if this gets going on a mass scale over the next decade, then what? I think there will be an issue with access to electric anywhere but your own house which makes me agree with Letterman, 40 miles is ridiculous to get around on. Plus it takes time to recharge, are we gonna put public receptcles along the roadways in place of fueling stations? It think this technology is going to have to improve significantly to get off the ground. GM (and consumers) would be better served if they invested in high-speed mass transit between cities. I imagine a highspeed train that paralells every interstate in America, stopping at each exit, parking garages for your gas guzzler to sit non-polluting each day except to get you a few miles to the train depot.







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MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.