A Primer on Passively Heated Solar Underground Houses

This primer on passively heated solar underground houses lists important MOTHER articles on this topic that will guide you when building an underground home.

This primer on passively heated solar underground houses explains the many advantages of a solar heated underground home.

This primer on passively heated solar underground houses explains the many advantages of a solar heated underground home.

Photo By Fotolia/toshket

Content Tools

Learn about building underground homes using this primer on passively heated solar underground houses.

A Primer on Passively Heated Solar Underground Houses

Regular MOTHER readers know that this magazine has been championing warm, safe, snug, storm-proof, easy to (passively solar) heat and cool underground houses for some time. If this is your first exposure to the idea, however, here's how to learn more about the subject:

Start with "The Beale Solar-Heated Subterranean Guest House", pages 80 — 81, in MOTHER NO. 45. Then move on to MOTHER NO. 46's Plowboy Interview with Andy Davis (in which Andy tells how he built a 1,200-square-foot, three-bedroom underground home — which looks like $60,000 — for only $15,000 in northern Illinois . . . and how he heated the building during the winter of 1976177 for the ridiculously low sum of $1.29).

Next up will be The Plowboy Interview with David Wright in MOTHER NO. 47. David has designed over 30 "sun tempered" and "passively solar conditioned" houses . . . and the interview was conducted in his present (97% heating and cooling self-sufficient) home on the coast of northern California.

Then, to learn how Jesse Savell — a contractor in Cotton, California — builds aboveground structures that are almost as energy efficient as the underground dwellings covered by the rest of the pieces listed here — read "Here's a Passively Heated and Cooled House That You Can Afford . . . and Will Want", pages 116 — 118, in MOTHER NO. 48.

"Landis and Pamela Gores' Semi-Subterranean 'House for all Seasons'", pages 64 — 65, MOTHER NO. 49, has another somewhat different slant on the subject. And "The Paul Isaacson Family Lives in the House of the Future", pages 101 — 103, MOTHER NO. 50, introduces still another passively solar heated, underground dwelling viewpoint, design, and method of construction.

(See pages 66 — 67 of this issue for information on how to order MOTHER's back issues.)


Read more about passively heated underground homes: The Beauty of Passively Heated Underground Houses.