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Do You Use CFLs at Home?

10/1/2009 12:41:30 PM

Tags: CFLs, light bulbs, energy efficiency, question to readers

Using compact-fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) is an easy way to save energy and money at home. These energy-efficient bulbs use much less electricity than an incandescent light bulb. (For a quick and fun overview of the benefits of CFLs vs. incandescents, check out the Common Craft video below.)

Over the last few years, CFLs have become much cheaper and easier to find. However, some people are concerned about the small amount of mercury in CFLs. Others are more interested in using LEDs — another type of energy-efficient light bulb. (Background information on both LEDs and CFLs is available on the Energy Star website, including this fact sheet on mercury and CFLs.)

We’d like to hear what type of light bulbs you’re using at home. Are you using CFLs, and why or why not? Share your thoughts by posting a comment below.

 



   



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Post a comment below.

 

John Stelmack
11/7/2010 9:21:20 AM
CFL's DO NOT last as long! Being an Energy Efficient Builder of SIP homes, my wife and I built our house to achieve the lowest HERS Index we could afford. It was certified at a HERS rating of 49. Every fixture in the house is a CFL fixture that uses the square base "plug in" type bulbs. The fixtures themselves are Energy Star Certified. The house is less than three years old and we've replaced approx ten of the bulbs already. There are two out currently. The kitchen ceiling light and a half bath vanity light. At $8 a bulb +-, we can say, through real life experience, DO NOT BELIEVE THE CLAIMS! These bulbs are a scam. Sure, they use less energy. But they produce less light and a less desirable light. We will be replacing the fixtures with incandescent fixtures and purchasing a large stock of those bulbs. We have tried a few LED lights which seem to hold promise. They are burning out as well. But at least they burn out differently. The LED's are configured in "rows" to satisfy voltage design requirements in the bulb. The LED failures leave the bulb half lit. I believe the LED technology will be the future, but the manufacturers have to work out the manufacturing costs and of course, increase the reliability. All in all I say "Thank You Congress! Thanks for jamming another useless product down our throats!" Regards, John

Luann Stubbs
1/3/2010 11:29:44 PM
I do not use CFLs because they contain mercury! Even if everyone recycled these bulbs properly, (which won't happen, so the mercury in them will end up in landfills where it will contaminate the soil), the manufacture of these bulbs calls for harvesting and handling of mercury meaning even more chances for contamination of the environment or exposure of workers to mercury. And for a really scary truth, check out the EPA's guidelines for cleaning up a broken bulb! Keep in mind that any small amount of mercury that gets in your rug means both young children and pets that play on the rug will be exposed. Of course, any mercury that vaporizes can be breathed in by all members of your household. Mercury is a nasty toxin that should never be used in any household products - why do you think mercury is no longer used in thermometers? I'm switching to LCDs instead. Note I'm very pro-environment; I even own an expensive Prius hybrid car. But CFLs are just not the solution to replace incandescent bulbs!

sheofthemtns
11/24/2009 6:10:24 PM
I use them and like them but one light seems rather dim-- they have lasted since I bought my house in 05 and I got them on sale at Walmart (the only store in town) Wonder why the diff in longevity? Could it be the elect.co? Seems I had more trouble before I moved-older home and elect.co. known for sags and spikes.

Dee Horttor
10/8/2009 7:46:20 AM
We have replaced about all our old light bulbs with CFL's We got the lowest electric bill we have had this last month. Got to think the bulbs had something to do with it. I have even put them in my wood shop. I like the light that they put out.

James_94
10/4/2009 11:40:58 PM
In responce to Josh, With fixtures this old my first thought would be to check the actual Voltage readings, both at the line and the load of each fixtue, I'm thinking this could be a wiring issue, Incandecents can be very forgiving, in fact you can even run them from a DC source and they still light if slightly less brillant. *****Josh 10/4/2009 2:53:07 PM We'd love to use more CFL's but some of our old light fixtures (house built in 1919) seems to have issues getting them lit. With pull chain sockets you have to hold the chain down till they're warmed up, and another old socket with a turn switch in our dining room won't get them lit either. Any ideas (besides eventually changing out the fixtures)?*****

James_94
10/4/2009 11:23:29 PM
Using CFL and have started using LED's. So far we like both but we can understand how some uses might depict a certain bulb.

HillbillyRob
10/4/2009 10:45:34 PM
I switched to LEDs in an old house, about 5 years ago. I waited till they were on sale and would by a box or two, whatever I could afford. We cut our power bill there in other ways too, insulated curtain liners, adding insulation even though it was a rental it saved us enough that when the landlord noticed and said you fixed it up so nice I am raising the rent.. We took our savings and used as down on our own place. We took our CFLs with us. We eventually replaced every bulb but the fridge, microwave and freezer. As they die off I am replacing those with LEDs from Sams Club( would go for the others but i am disabled and on a very limited income. I take the CFLs to the ecycle in batches. Along the way I have added some insulated curtain liners, sealed air leaks, cook in covered pots on and in the stove. We have cut our household carbon foot print from 12tons to 3 and electric from 3300kwhrs to 1190 kwhrs. We have a solar water heater to install when we can afford to build the platform to put it up where the Sun can hit it all day. We plan to go total solar power in the next ten years for the house and most of the farm.

Paul Wade
10/4/2009 6:40:35 PM
These bulbs have pros and cons to them. Are they made any where except China? I haven't seen any 'made in the USA'. They also are not as long lasting as they are supposed to be. I have had them go out within a week. The main factor is the danger. The instructions on disposing of them makes it a time consuming task... and a dangerous one. Also, they do not offer a tri-watt bulb. This should be an individual desire use, not an order by the government.

Josh_3
10/4/2009 2:53:07 PM
We'd love to use more CFL's but some of our old light fixtures (house built in 1919) seems to have issues getting them lit. With pull chain sockets you have to hold the chain down till they're warmed up, and another old socket with a turn switch in our dining room won't get them lit either. Any ideas (besides eventually changing out the fixtures)?

Gene Mumper_1
10/3/2009 11:06:28 PM
Probably about 70% of the light sources in the house have been replaced with either CFLs or standard florescent fixtures. Those that have not are low usage bulbs for which the cost of change far exceeds the gain. The result is that despite ongoing rate increases our monthly electric bills have remained rather stable. Be aware we are in an area where AC is not necessary.

jimhenry
10/3/2009 10:26:08 PM
I converted my previous home to CFLs many years ago when they were quite expensive. I did see a significant reduction in my electric bill. When I built a new home in 2006 I threw out all the incandescent bulbs the builder put in and replaced with CFLs. I am quite happy with them. It seems as they age they then take a moment or two to reach full brightness, not when new. Also the colder the environment the longer it takes to reach full brightness. They do NOT seem to last as long as advertised but still represent a significant savings. I don't worry about global warming, If there is anything at all to it. I try to conserve energy in any area because I don't want my energy dollars going overseas to people who hate us and to reduce my expenses. Jim

Price_2
10/3/2009 11:47:25 AM
I write the date on the base of the bulb with a sharpie when I install it. I haven't had any bulbs last more than a year so far. I also had a desk lamp with one of these bulbs and one of my children or one of their friends broke it...and didn't tell anyone...so I wonder if we've been breathing in mercury vapors all summer (didn't need the light because it was summer, so just recently discovered the breakage). I save the packages the bulbs come in to put the burned out bulbs in and after I collect several, I take them to be recycled.

Gordon_10
10/3/2009 3:17:11 AM
We have recently built a new timber frame house. My wife came back with a box full of incandescents & I insisted that we pay the premium and get CFL's. Now the only incandescents in the house are in my teenage daughter's lava lamp and my wife's bedside lamp. We also installed LED lights on our stairway. They only take 1.5W! What a pleasure!

gerald Eaton_1
10/3/2009 2:38:31 AM
I have been using CFL's for about 11 years. I have slowly implemented LED lamps into my system. There are a huge variety of LED lamps. They come in T8 lamp retrofits, floodlights, MR-16, Globe, Candelabra, Medium base, and even high power HID replacements. They are typically rated at 12 volts and 120 volts With lifetimes ranging between 20,000 to 60,000 lumens, LED lights are great. They cost a lot, but prices are coming down. As for CFL's, they are good. They do save power. As a Journeyman Electrician, I have done numerous retrofits involving CFL's. These industrial/commercial tenants pay good money to do these. The savings are huge and evident within the first power bill. They do save power, which offsets the mercury produced during power generation. Reducing the load on coal fired plants also saves fuel and energy used to mine and transport the coal. The color rendering may not be for everyone, but it does not bother me. I guess you could blame that on my excellent vision. Most lamps are outsourced to Asia. Not all of them are. As a Union Member, I check labels of origin. There are still American made lamps. You just have to check and be thorough. One manufacturer will have two different wattage lights of the same style and series. One will be of USA origin and the other China. Check around, look at other retailers, support your neighbor and friends, not the Chinese. We have a Local company here that builds wind turbines. Don't buy Chinese! BE INFORMED! CHECK THE LABEL BEFORE YOU BUY IT. SAY NO TO WAL-MART!!!!!!!!!!!

Robin C. Rutan_1
10/2/2009 11:27:23 PM
I have used CFLs for many years. My electric bill is the envy of my neighbors. I pay between 20 and 60 dollars a month depending on use of Air Conditioning. I even have an electric clothes dryer so the big savings are in the use of CFLs throughout the house. My next big project will be solar for hot water to cut the gas bill which also isn't too bad because I bought the best insulation I could get for my MF home ten years ago.

Gary_48
10/2/2009 9:29:36 PM
This is another scam by industry to change us over (read that spend lots of money) to a lesser product in the name of "savings" or "go green". They are ALL the same and they are ALL worthless! This includes brand name's and off brand name's. They just do not last anywhere near as long as incandescent bulbs. Not even a close contest. 10,000 hours? I'd jump up and down with joy for 1,000 hours. The bright white are closest to an incandescent output level of lighting. The yellow light have a much, much lower level of light. This makes you need to replace a 60 watt equivalent CFL bulb with a 75 watt equivalent CFL to produce good enough light. Not a good idea. Don't buy into this scam, put your money in a fund for a replacement window or more insulation if you want to do good for the world. Tune up the car....plant a tree....anything but throw good money after these bad product's!!!!!

Cascadia
10/2/2009 9:22:59 PM
I have no incandescent bulbs in my house, garage, storage shed, etc. except the small appliance lights inside the microwave and oven and the heat lamp in the pump house to keep the pipes from freezing in the winter. Outdoor lighting is solar LED. Everything else is CFL. They work fine in the bathrooms, ceiling fans, dimmers, recessed cans, lamps, closets, in the refrigerator and freezer. The new ones are instantly bright, daylight (not blue), don't buzz or hum, last years (haven't replaced one in several years), use way less energy than incandescent and with instant rebate coupons from our utility cost about the same as incandescent (I've even seen them FREE with coupons). That said, I use very little lighting, maybe 1% of my electric bill. Buying Energy Star appliances made a much bigger impact on my electric bill. Electric bill: $25/month @ $.044/kWh. Heating: wood stove (free and carbon neutral).

Fornell
10/2/2009 8:06:47 PM
I am trying to convert to CFL but my old light bulbs that have been in the house since I purchased the house in 1998 are still working fine. They are bulbs from Com Ed's light bulb program which no longer exists. Anyway the CFL's that I have installed are a dim light when I first turn them on and get brighter when they warm up. I don't care for their look in recessed lighting but TARGET stores have an exclusive CFL bulb that looks just like a regular bulb. I will give it a try to reduce my energy needs and save some cash.

Rosewood513
10/2/2009 5:43:51 PM
I try to be diligent about being green and prqactice it as much as possible. So I do use CFL but I do it under protest. I do not like them at all, the light is very low and I can hardly read by them and knitting and sewing is even more difficult. But the light in general is soft and pleasant while just sitting here and I am happy to help Mother Earth any way I can.

Art_6
10/2/2009 3:58:08 PM
I am changing the incandescent to CFL as the old burn out. I did change a 3-way to a special 3-way ... twice. The 3-way CFL is no good. It burns out too fast.

Peg Mahaffy
10/2/2009 3:18:52 PM
We have changed from CFL's to LED's wherever we can - yep they cost more but our electric bills for a 2500 sq ft house are about $35 -$45 per month. You have to dispose of the CFL's carefully. Have yet to break one but have read about disposal methods. Check with your hazardous waste dept. DEQ helps too.

Old Salt_5
10/2/2009 2:25:52 PM
CFLs are great money savers and energy savers. We need to make a better push in the communities to have proper recycling facilities for the non-functioning, worn out CFLs and the ones broken and PROPERLY CLEANED-UP and bagged so they do not end-up in a landfill somewhere. I have been able to cut my electric bill to 1/3 of the original cost of operations. Other conservation measures have also been taken with other appliances, as well.

APhotoWizard
10/2/2009 1:45:37 PM
I have used CFC since they first came on the market. I use them primarily in places that are hard to reach as it has been my experience they last longer than incandescent bulbs. I even I even installed extensions so I could use them in my flood light sockets. I also used them in closet and other fixtures because I can get more light without overheating the socket. (I use the largest bulb size that will ft in the fixture). I use them in high vibration applications such a fan lights, stove lights, and shop lights. In my shop light they give more light and do not burn the carpet, dash, or my arm when I get the light too close. They are worthless in areas where color rendition is important. Most of the ones I have found contain too much blue and too little red. This makes putting on make-up, matching color samples, comparing medical test strips, or matching artists colors impossible to do. I also observed that they cost me more money to operate than incandescent lights contrary to the hype. While it is true that they produce more light for a given amount of electricity, they are no more power efficient than incandescent bulbs. Both turn 100% of the power used into either heat or light. Since most of the US (From Atlanta northward) needs much more heating than cooling, the heat generated by the bulbs actually reduces the amount the heater operates. Since electricity cost less per BTU where I live than the propane my furnace uses, the bulb switch actually increases my heating bill in the winter much more that it reduces my cooling bill in the summer. The net being that the bulbs cost more and they increase my fuel cost. As noted in other comments, all the CFC bulbs I have found come from China thus contain a lot of diesel fuel and they contain mercury. For these reasons, I conclude that while they have a place in my life, they are not the wonderful thing they are portrayed to be. They don't save money, they contain the most potent neurotoxin on the p

APhotoWizard
10/2/2009 1:45:31 PM
I have used CFC since they first came on the market. I use them primarily in places that are hard to reach as it has been my experience they last longer than incandescent bulbs. I even I even installed extensions so I could use them in my flood light sockets. I also used them in closet and other fixtures because I can get more light without overheating the socket. (I use the largest bulb size that will ft in the fixture). I use them in high vibration applications such a fan lights, stove lights, and shop lights. In my shop light they give more light and do not burn the carpet, dash, or my arm when I get the light too close. They are worthless in areas where color rendition is important. Most of the ones I have found contain too much blue and too little red. This makes putting on make-up, matching color samples, comparing medical test strips, or matching artists colors impossible to do. I also observed that they cost me more money to operate than incandescent lights contrary to the hype. While it is true that they produce more light for a given amount of electricity, they are no more power efficient than incandescent bulbs. Both turn 100% of the power used into either heat or light. Since most of the US (From Atlanta northward) needs much more heating than cooling, the heat generated by the bulbs actually reduces the amount the heater operates. Since electricity cost less per BTU where I live than the propane my furnace uses, the bulb switch actually increases my heating bill in the winter much more that it reduces my cooling bill in the summer. The net being that the bulbs cost more and they increase my fuel cost. As noted in other comments, all the CFC bulbs I have found come from China thus contain a lot of diesel fuel and they contain mercury. For these reasons, I conclude that while they have a place in my life, they are not the wonderful thing they are portrayed to be. They don't save money, they contain the most potent neurotoxin on the p

WILLIAM COOPER_1
10/2/2009 1:27:24 PM
I have been using CFLs for approx 6 years all over the house and have not had to replace the first one. They did take a little getting used to. Now I am looking at LEDs. Maybe MEN could do an article on these...

Donald_23
10/2/2009 1:21:28 PM
I use incandescent bulbs in winter because they are excellant heaters...(5 % of their energy is in the form of heat..efficient little heaters are those regular bulbs, will hate it when they are made no more.

doe53
10/2/2009 1:06:14 PM
We have used cfls everywhere in our home for years except in dimmers. We even have globes in our bathroom, love them. We have used regular cfls in outdoor lights in Vermont, minus 25, slow to get bright but always work. Our electric bill went down 10% between the bulbs and 80% decrease in using dryer. I definitely think they are worth it.

blainenay
10/2/2009 11:17:06 AM
In my experience, CFLs don't last as long as old-fashioned incandescent bulbs -- especially in outdoor applications. They don;t work with dimmers. I use them in perhaps 50% of the sockets in the house, but I must have incandescents for the rest of the house because CFLs simply are not satisfactory even if they were free. Congress must rescind its legislation banning future sales of incandescent bulbs. This is just one more example that proves that radical environmentalists and nearly all politicians don't know science, don't understand economics, and won't do the math.

Everett Clary
10/2/2009 10:51:49 AM
I have used CFLs everywhere a standard screw type base allows them, with the exception of those circuits with dimmers. They work well but don't last as long as claimed. I have a deck that runs all the way around the house with 4 to 7 foot eaves with recessed lights every 8 to 10 feet. There are a total of 30 fixtures broken up into 3 circuits, the largest having 19 lights designed for 60-65 watt incandescents (BR30). Substituting CFLs brings the wattage down from 1200 to less than 250 watts when the circuit is energized. The outside performance is just fine and although winter is generally mild here in the Pacific Northwest, they all worked down to 11 degrees F, the low last winter. Maybe some day they will be replaced with LEDs, but for now, could not be happier with the CFLs.

BJ_1
10/2/2009 10:22:54 AM
I've been using CFL's as long as they've been widely available. I use mostly Ikea bulbs and haven't had any of the problems with color and short life many people report. The Ikea bulbs are very close to the color temp of incandescents. My only complaint with CFL's is the slow warm up time to reach full brightness. In area's like pantry and closets with very short and infrequent usage times I still use incandescent bulbs for instant & full brightness. These locations only represent a fraction of a percent of total usage anyway. I'm also an artist that makes lamps from recycled and repurposed materials and use CFL's in most of my lamps in keeping with the environmentally conscious nature of my work. The reduced heat makes it easier to use many materials like styrofoam, plastics and paper.

Stacey_1
10/2/2009 10:19:29 AM
I'm waiting to find a CFL not made in China. How much energy is wasted making them in a country not known for its conservation? How much energy is wasted shipping them from 5000 miles away? Does this really add up to overall carbon savings? Why should I have to do business with dictators and sweatshops?

practicalman45
10/2/2009 10:13:41 AM
Energywise, these things are great. For 15 or 20 watts of usage I just leave them burn day and night. I've installed them outdoors in fixtures that shield them from rain. They dont like the photoeye day and night switches, so I let em burn day and night, or use a timer. I think they last longer that way than turning them on and off. Still saves plenty of power. Consider: replace a 150 watt(!) par flood light that costs $7 to buy and runs maybe 12 hours a night outdoors (still, only lasting 3-6 months!) with a $3-5 compact flourescent bulb that draws 20 watts and can last up to 5 years running day and night. Its a no-brainer. One thing to watch out for: these guys can put out tremendous radio frequency radiation. If your AM radio starts having a 60 cycle hum interferrence problem? take a portable radio around to all of your lights and track down the offender (the hum gets louder as you approach the offender) and replace it. They can make a HUGE amount of RF (radio frequency) pollution and still be burning. When they do go bad wrap them up real good in plastic bags before trashing them. I don't like the idea of the mercury in them being accidentally released....They should figure out a way to make them without the mercury, otherwise, thumbs up.

Tommy Huneycutt_2
10/2/2009 10:10:37 AM
Yes I have been using CFL bulbs for almost a year now throughout my house and they HAVE saved me money on my electric bill. My father always used them even when they were very expensive and they saved him money too. Some people don't like the little delay when they first come on but I am a very patient man and it doesn't bother me. It probably isn't a lot of money to some people but every little bit helps.

Greg H
10/2/2009 10:06:30 AM
I've been using CFLs for several years and I've been very happy with them. They even make them for small ceiling fan fixtures now. Of the cheap ones I bought, only one burned out early. The more expensive ones all come with warranties. Be sure to look for "soft white" or warmer colors if you want something similar to an incandescent. Some of them give off a bluish light.

Coache_kwe_1
10/2/2009 9:37:59 AM
When CFLs first came out years ago I ash-canned my old ones and have been using them ever since. It's always a surprise when they burn out. But more, I am now 61 years old; when I return to spirit I need to know I did everything I could to be a part of Mother and not one of her abusers. And that's the bottom line.

Alex McKenzie
10/2/2009 9:25:49 AM
I mostly use CFLs. The important thing to know about them is that brand matters, and you generally do get what you pay for. The more expensive ones I bought have been running for years, while the cheaper ones burned out in a matter of months. It's also important that your fixture be wired correctly: I had a ceiling fixture with a bad ground wire that killed three bulbs in a week before I figured out what was going on. I do still have some incandescents in the bathroom, since the previous owner left them and I'm not willing to throw them away, and I have one in the hood fixture over the stove, since I'm not sure grease splatters and high temperature would be great for a CFL, but I use them just about everywhere else. Oh... and if you're putting them in a dimmable fixture, make sure you buy CFLs rated for them. If not, they may catch fire.

Donna_4
10/2/2009 9:06:12 AM
When we purchased our recent home two years ago, we replaced about 80% of the incandescent bulbs with CFL's. Several have had to be replaced. I use them everywhere including the bathroom (have not had to replace them there.) I am concerned about mercury, but my biggest complaint is that they just don't give off enough, bright light, especially in the kitchen. I find that if I am working at my island, I usually have to turn on my overhead ceiling fan light (which uses incandescent bulbs) to get enough light to actually "see" what I'm doing. If LED lights became more affordable tomorrow, I'd trash all my CFL's and install LED's in their place. Energy savings and carbon footprint aside, I guess I'm just not a big fan of CFL's.

Nathan Hetrick_2
10/2/2009 9:02:40 AM
We use CFLs in our house, but we're trying to switch over to LEDs since they are even more energy efficient, last longer, and have no mercury. Current LEDs aren't perfect for everything since most of them are either small bulbs or are spotlight rather than flood, but we have been happy with the LEDs we've found so far. One our our fixtures seems to burn out CFLs rather quickly, so we do have some incandescent bulbs in that one, but the fixture is so rarely used it probably makes only a negligible difference.

sheila_18
10/2/2009 8:30:07 AM
My husband and I installed CFLs in our apartment when we moved in six months ago and all are still working fine. Like Dominic, we use them everywhere but the bathroom, because I read somewhere that CFLs don't work as well in high-humidity areas. I have incandescent bulbs in the light fixture in the bath and a small LED bulb in the nightlight (found the LED bulb on Amazon for less than $5; it has a 2-year warranty and the manufacturer claims it will last for 7 years). We bought CFLs for my mother a while back and some bulbs lasted only a few months. When we bought the CFLs for our place, we made sure we chose a different brand. The ones we bought for our place are N:Vision bulbs -- and so far, so good.

Catskill Clean Energy
10/2/2009 8:02:03 AM
I use CFL's everywhere and don't worry too much about the Mercury in them it is about 1/5th as much as in a watch battery, and I'm not eating it or touching it either, you probably ingest twice as much eating a fish from the local market or pond!! I have had them about two years and have not had to replace any of them even the ones I use daily like the bathroom! I compared my electric bill for 5 years and it even cut my bill by a nice chunk (about 17% vs incandesent) I agree they are a little dim when first turned on but within 2 minutes they are up to par. I hope they continue to improve them I will be a user until they come up with something better !! Peace,,,RG ..NY Homesteader @ nyhomesteader dot com

ccm989
10/2/2009 7:44:27 AM
I find the CFL bulbs are NOT long lasting and I've had to recycle at least a half dozen already since I made the switch (about a year ago). I bring them back to Home Depot which is the only local place that will accept them. Also the light quality is not as bright and I find that I now need reading glasses to read at night. OK, the reading glasses may be because I have now hit the Big 4-0 but I like to blame the CFLs! So far I don't feel they've lived up to their hype. Maybe the next generation of CFLs will be better . . .

George Works
10/2/2009 7:42:27 AM
We use CFLs everywhere except for motion activated security lights, which are rarely on and so account for very little energy use. We tried several brands before finding one with good color, rapid turn-on and long life. I'm a retired engineer and I looked into the mercury issue. Yes, there is mercury in CFLs, but the mercury used each year in CFLs is insignificant compared to the mercury emitted by coal burning power plants. If you are worried about mercury, worry about coal. I used to work for an LED manufacturer. LEDs are coming along, but the ones you can buy are still not remotely competitive with CFLs in cost or light output and the actual life to half brightness in home use isn't much better than a high quality CFL. Both white LEDs and CFLs use a phosphor excited by ultraviolet light, and the phosphor degrades over time.

Adam Ramirez
10/2/2009 7:29:21 AM
I try to use them as much as possible in our home. The only problem that I am experiencing is that they do not seem to last very long. I purchased a few recently that either did not work out of the package, or only lasted a month. I know that there are several types available that should be used in specific installations, but I do not feel this information is readily available to the average consumer when they see the bulbs at their local store. For instance, you need to buy dimmable bulbs for installations with dimmers, and I hear that they are not intended to be upside down such as ceiling fan applications, etc.

Pat Miketinac
10/1/2009 9:14:15 PM
We use them instead of incandescents except for the chandelier, which has a dimmer. I could not find 12 volt LED bulbs for the fixtures in my motor home, so I broke some bulbs and used the bases to make my own with LED's and resistors. I estimate that they use about a tenth as much power as the old bulbs, based on the battery life of my LED flashlights. Next, I plan to try several LED's in series so that their rated voltage adds up to 12 volts, eliminating the resistor, and giving more light.

cog_nate
10/1/2009 8:58:29 PM
My wife and I have installed CFLs throughout our house. I'm honestly not a huge "save the earth" guy, because I think that what we personally do energywise is -- in the long run -- globally insignificant, but CFLs cut our electricity bills by between 20 and 30 percent.

Dominic Ebacher
10/1/2009 2:26:59 PM
We use CFL's everywhere we can. One place we don't use them is in the bathroom - the color tones tend to make skin and face look washed out, whereas incandescents warming tones mean a more welcome looking face staring back at you in the mirror first thing in the morning.







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MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.