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Maple and Oak Woods Needs Help Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 5:06:55 AM
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dead wood should really be cut out of the woods. It can become a fire hazard. IE california! Clearing out the deadwood and brush from the base ofyour old trees, will give them some room to breathe and make them flourish better. Better yet, pile up some of the brush and burn it and then take the ash and spread it around your trees.
TTYL
steve
Ryan and Kathy
#2 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 5:52:24 AM
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I know removing some of the dead wood is good, but where do I stop? Wild mushrooms need rotten logs and deer hide in the brush and fallen trees. I thought I was doing good by taking the dead wood and making a fence dividing my land from the neighbour''s, but maby I should have burned it all.
dropkick
#3 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 6:43:49 AM
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People have changed the ecosystem. There are not as many brush fires as there used to be (clears the deadwood and the undergrowth). Also our ancestors cut out much of the old growth and the new young stuff is growing to close together. This leads to unhealthy stands, suseptable to disease and forest killing fires.

While some dead wood is needed for a complete ecosystem. There is to much now and you by yourself are not going to remove any where near enough of it to mess up the system. Besides the trees make new deadwood constantly.

Now is also the time of year to be dragging things around as the ground is froze and you won''t damage it as badly. (peeked at your profile to figure ground temp. - WI)

Make several smaller piles instead of 1 big burn pile as you can sterilize the ground under it, and it takes a long time to recover.
I have burnt many piles and only done this once though, and it was a very large pile that burnt for 2 days.
VaughnHill
#4 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 7:31:11 AM
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I wouldnt worry about your indian wall i have made them myself and they make good habitat for the critters. You would be doing your woods a favor by cutting away the undesirable growth.This is how i cleared away some of the growth in my woods. I cut down all the trees that were not "good trees" IE. oak, maple, pine, walnut, hickory ect. I also cut down any deformed trees.Of the good trees that were left i cut down any that were closer than ten feet from one another.As for the under growth i cut it all except for around three sides of the perimeter which keeps the area secluded and gives more area for critters.

As for all the cut wood and brush. i used what i could as firewood and with the pile i had left (which was about the size of a three bedroom ranch house) I rented a commercial sized chipper for $150 for two days. I used it as mulch around the trees and for a driveway/parking area.

Did i do it the right way? i have no idea. but the trees look a lot better and fuller, the ground isnt all soggy, and i can walk though it without getting my eye poked out.

I also found one apple tree in there that i left and plan on pruning and taking some cuttings from to start new trees from one of these days.
johnhagen
#5 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 12:12:59 PM
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Hello:Ryan and Kathy,We manage 57 acres for wildlife on our farm in north central IL.You can have a great time at this as we do it for recreation.Some ideas we do that seam to work is to make L shaped brush piles thru out the woods,this gives the animals a better chance from predators.Another idea is to cut all trees away from your trees that you want to keep closer than 10 feet,this hurts but you will see the gain in a year or two.The first year poke a hole around your trees even the big ones and about 8 inches deep and pour in some 10-10-10 fertilizer,about a cup four places around the tree.This will really make the nut trees go.For the animals go to your farm and fleet store and get some of those white or brown salt blocks and break it up in baseball size pieces we use a saw and put them under the brush piles and one large one at the base of a large un wanted tree for the deer.As you go on each year you can add bird houses you make from scrap wood in the winter,we use a generic hole 1 1/2 inches in diamenter.Well could go for hours but if you need som other ideas let us know.
Ryan and Kathy
#6 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 4:44:29 PM
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Sounds great, I''m layed-off right now so I''ll be out back getting as much free entertainment as I can. Just the other day I put two dozen 5/8"W x 1 1/2"L holes In a standing dead tree and filled them with suet. We have a lot more birds now, but I''m still waiting for the elusive Pileated woodpecker.
ajortolani
#7 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 5:01:55 PM
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[:)]
Hi Ryan & Kathy, your place sounds nice! Making a fence with those old logs is a fine idea, it will gradually decompose so just keep adding to it over the years.
We suffer here in the Pocono''s with Beech....I hate it...it''s the weed of the woods & chokes out all the good trees! We''ve been chopping it down for firewood (which is all its good for!), in the meantime those gorgeous old oaks & maples are exploding from FINALLY receiving sunlight!
Whenever we have old brush etc, we use it for bonfires which are great. Too much "build-up" is a fire hazard so what your doing is helpful. The mulch idea is great too.
Those pesky deer will adapt rather too well to all your cleaning & clearing & will start eating whatever you plant!
I would love to hear more about your Indian wall, our area used to be home to many indians & most of the roads here were built following old indian trails.
Ryan and Kathy
#8 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 6:11:54 PM
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Hey, love to tell you real quick about my first Indian wall. Necessity, the mother of all inventions, brought my friend and I to build a wall because back then (high school) where we lived there wasn''t many places where we could hang out and build a fire, grill food, and drink BEER[;)] The only place was the neighbors woods so up went a wall to block the light and sound of the fire. I imagine Indians did the same, well, except for the beer[}:)]
skruzich
#9 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 11:47:28 PM
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Ack Beech wood is the best wood to use for musical instrument soundboards or make stuff like cutting boards or anything you need a very hard wood for. we don''t have much if any beech here in the south.
steve
JFS
#10 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 8:34:02 AM
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Contact your local county agent they will help you or they will send you to the right people. Our county agent loves to help people that want to improve there land
johnhagen
#11 Posted : Saturday, December 06, 2003 1:05:55 PM
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Dont know if you have done this,but try your local locker plant and ask them for there suet that they dont want can get it free.Take it home and melt it and then add bird seed and you will have suet cakes for the whole winter.We pour ours in card board beer case boxs or soda pop boxs the ones that that case cans sit in just the right size.Let it cool a bit till it starts to sit up then pour it in and make some knife marks on the top it will be easier to break this way.
mikeg
#12 Posted : Friday, January 09, 2004 3:09:20 PM
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I make small car sized brush piles as I clear walking trails and as I walk them I pick up sticks and dead fall as I go and throw them on the piles. Keeps building the piles as they decompose and keeps the trails clear. I do grow gourds in the garden and make nesting boxes with them I hang these along the trail back 10 to 20 ft. I have also started puting 10 ft lengths of corigated drain pipe at the bottom of the piles between two logs with at least one end out of the pile. Makes for a safe haven for small criters.
Thats a good tip with the salt blocks in the piles I''ll have to try that.
Ryan and Kathy
#13 Posted : Friday, January 09, 2004 11:57:31 PM
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I worked on my "Indain Wall" today and added another 50ft of wall and trail for a total of 200 out of 330ft done. For years the farmer next door has been pushing trees over on to my land to make his field bigger (more light) wich makes it imposible to walk the property line. Untill now, hehe.
ajortolani
#14 Posted : Monday, January 12, 2004 1:32:34 PM
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Ole, could you post us a picture of your wall?
Ryan and Kathy
#15 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 4:41:58 PM
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Hey I wish I could but I have now idea how. Really. What should I do? I don''t have the funds for a digital camera and I don''t know what this POS computer is capable of with a pentium 1 and win ''95
ajortolani
#16 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 5:03:30 PM
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Oh, Ok, I hear that!!! LOL, been there too. Well, your wall sounds really interesting so I guess you''ll just need to put the picture into words - 1000 of them. LOL
Ryan and Kathy
#17 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 5:18:04 PM
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No, realy, I mean, can''t I just buy one of those disposible cameras and get a picture cd when I get them devloped. Then I gues I could just down load kodak shareware, but I don''t know. Otherwise, what does it cost for a plug and play computer and digital camera, one thousand, maby two?
hunter63
#18 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 5:21:30 PM
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Ole, I have trying to deal with a weed tree/bush, i think is called "Buck Thorn", stuff spreads under ground with runnersand can be thick stands.
So far the only way to kill it out is to cut in down and paint the stump with brush killer( i wince every time I do it.) Do you have this at your place?
Ryan and Kathy
#19 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 5:41:24 PM
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Yup, I have Buckthorn, Hawthorn, and the winner is... poison ivy (I wince and start to itch just thinking about it too)
ajortolani
#20 Posted : Sunday, January 18, 2004 6:23:32 PM
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Can''t help with the Buckthorn but can with the Poison Ivy:
Wash area with warm water & apply aloe vera (stabilized - not the cheap kind)- apply several times, keeping area moist, itching will be completely gone next day & and any lesions gone within a week.
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