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Beekeeping basics? Options
begimorst
#1 Posted : Wednesday, December 03, 2003 9:06:39 PM
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Run up to them really fast flailing your arms screaming "booga, booga!"

I''m an ass, it is the way I overcompensate for not knowing anything.

Seriously, I wish you well. Please do not run up to them really fast flailing your arms screaming "booga, booga!"
skruzich
#2 Posted : Wednesday, December 03, 2003 11:13:37 PM
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Sheila,
IF they are feral bees, Your best bet is to leave them alone unless you know what you are doing. You can get them to move into a normal hive, but it takes work and you must find the queen to get them to move. Find yourself a beekeeper around the area where you live and get them to come out and get the bees. But I would say your not going to get them to move until spring anyway.
it is too late to harvest the honey, they will have been eating whatever honey they put away in that hive.
Steve
ajortolani
#3 Posted : Wednesday, December 03, 2003 11:44:32 PM
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[:0]
Sheila, if your deathly allergic to them, call an EXTERMINATOR & kill them all, then go to your local market & buy a jar of honey, soak off the label, put your own on & just tell the hubby "look what I did today with all the help of my "online friends"![:D][:D]
Sheila
#4 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 1:31:44 AM
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I appreciate your concern for my well-being, Ajortolani, but I don''t want them dead. In our area, we''ve had a drop in honeybee populations that''s affecting pollination rates for crops. If they were Africanized, yes, I''d have them removed. But those little guys help keep us in food and flowers!

I haven''t been stung in almost 30 years, even though I garden a lot. I pay attention, I wear dull-colored clothing, no perfume, and if bees are really busy around a certain planting area, I''ll work somewhere else. But honeybees are pretty docile, and I''ve been able to coexist peacefully so far. But I do have the syringe, and keep it with me, just in case.
skruzich
#5 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 2:54:47 AM
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AJ you wouldn''t! Thats the reason why we don''t have many feral bees left!!!!!
Bees are necessary for alot of things. They contribute so much to our lives.

Honeybees won''t bother you unless you mess with them or they get stuck in your hair or something like that. I work with them and have only been stung a couple times and I don''t even wear a veil and wear shorts and a t-shirt.

Now yellow jackets are another story so are regular ole hornets.

Africanized bees are not that big a deal, media makes them out to be killer bees they aren''t that bad. Just don''t get stupid and mess with them. YES they are more defensive and will protect the hive but its actually not a bad thing. They aren''t as prone to mites and beetles, and produce rather well.
Alot of the beekeepers are working with the AHB''s and getting some decent results.
steve
ajortolani
#6 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 12:59:16 PM
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[}:)]
Steve, I would!
Now as to yellow-jackets, I have them dead within minutes of spotting them - those little rat-bastards!!![}:)]
DanR
#7 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 1:58:12 PM
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Sheila:

You made a very good point when you said that you did not wear perfume. Some types really set them off. If they are in a tree you will have to cut into the tree to get the honey and that will ruin their home. Go with a beekeeper to trap them and then move them to a safe location. If your Mr. is willing, he can then become the "beekeeper" in your family. From what you have said on earlier post, I take it that you live in a well populated area. If that is the case, you might want to check your insurence policy to see if you would be covered if someone sued you for their getting stung by "your" bees. That is just another example of the mixed up world we live in.
ajortolani
#8 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 3:47:45 PM
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Boy is that true Danr, imagine it been your fault that a bee goes "off the reservation" & stings the neighbour!!
It''s the same as been sued because some jackass slips & falls on the pavement outside my home during a blizzard! Why are you walking on concrete in those conditions first off & why the hell weren''t you more carefull!!! We don''t even own the damn pavement to begin with!!
Sheila
#9 Posted : Thursday, December 04, 2003 7:01:12 PM
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They''re not in a tree--they''re in a trash can. Silly bees. Steve--would they be eating the honey even though they''re out and about eating nectar all day? I don''t mean to be so dense, but I just don''t know a lot about the little fellas.
skruzich
#10 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 12:13:38 AM
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Ok sheila. depending on the temperature, they will forage for nectar if there are blossoms to get it from. They will use this to make and store honey. The other thing they could be doing is robbing another hive. You said they are in a trash can, what a choice for a hive. :) hehe. Uhmmm But a trash can would work. The honey they make is natural comb honey and will be rather thick. You also have another problem as you have to know what is brood comb and what is Honey storage ;) hehe. wouldn''t do to take a bite of comb and get bee larvae.
IF they are in a trash can, you can get a local beekeeper to come out and get them or even help your hubbie start his own hive. These guys are probably a swarm that left a apiary in a 5 mile radius from where you are.
If the temp drops below 70, they will start going into winter mode and will eat the honey. If they have no honey they will die or you will have to feed them sugar syrup during the winter months to keep them alive until the nectar starts flowing again.
Sounds though to me you have a decent start of a hive. They don''t eat nectar, they bring it back and put it into a honey cell, and then fan the cell until the percentage of water is down to 17% in the nectar then cap it off. They also store pollen in those cells too. After they evaporate the water we call it honey ;P
Then they will eat some of it.
Heres a neat thing you can do, take a honey jar, empty it but do not wash it out, and set it next to the bees. It will be spotless in less than a hour.
Bees are hygeenic which means their clean freaks! The first thing they do to a new hive is clean it from top to bottom, every crack and crevace. Then they go get resin from trees, shrubs ect and make propolis and coat all the walls, frames anything that has pores. This keeps bacteria from getting into the hive. then they go to laying brood eggs, and when they build up enough worker bees, nursery bees, drones, they begin to produce honey and store it.

Steve
Sheila
#11 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 1:13:38 AM
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Thanks, Steve, that helps a lot. Did I mention that this was a clean, empty trash can?
I could probably count on the fingers of one hand the numbers of days per year that we don''t have bees out buzzing in our garden. I try to make sure that we have some of the stuff that they like blooming all year. We have hummingbirds nesting here, too, so we have two good reasons to do so. I''ll pass on to the Mr. your suggestions. Thanks again.
skruzich
#12 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 2:53:22 AM
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Well, if the bees moved into that trashcan, You can be assured that you can eat from it now. :) hehe. I wasn''t kidding that they clean something spotless.
Bees in the garden is a good thing. Thats why you have a garden! They polinate everything.
It is interesting that they chose the trashcan.
CntryLvnGrl
#13 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 5:33:55 AM
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I never actually knew how those lil bees made honey. That''s cool Steve. Thanks. I will add that to my 1001 useless facts that I carry around in my head at all times. And in the future will pick it out to amaze and awe my friends.. lol
DanR
#14 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 2:03:28 PM
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Sheila:

Go and look at the list of books I put on the forum. It does have a book on beekeeping. I would not take any honey from a hive this late in the season. Late August would be the last time I took any. If you can get them to move into a man-made hive that is the way to get honey when you replace the "supers". 40 to 50 pounds from one hive would not be excessive from your area. As "killer" bees are already in your area, I would replace the queen every year, in the spring, to ensure that your hive stays Italian, that means gentle. The time I looked into getting a hive my crazy backdoor neighbor yelled over the fence that if her son was stung she would take us to court. The beekeeper I was talking with told me to forget it. He said he carried a one million dollar policy for just such a problem. But with it being a "hobby" for you, it might not be that big a problem. But with insurence companies these days, you never know.
skruzich
#15 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 3:05:03 PM
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If you have a beehive as a hobby, most insurance policies cover it. They can''t do anything if a bee leaves your property and stings someone, they would have to prove it came from your hive. Kinda hard when you typically have 60 - 80 thousand bees in a hive, and then you take into account that bees will go up to 5 miles away foraging. Anyway, My insurance agent said that as long as its a hobby, (she said that up to 100 hives is a hobby), and as long as you post signs no tresspassing, you are covered. someone might sue, but you have insurance company lawyers that will handle the suit.
My fear is that someone will be a dumbass and come onto the property and mess with hot hive.

As far as killer bees, they are missnamed, AHB''s, (Africanized Honey Bees) are extremely defensive. They don''t go off after humans for no reason, if they feel threatened then they will swarm. The prob with them is that they are extremely defensive and will follow as much as 500 yards away from the hive. Kinda like hornets do. I would work AHB''s if i were in a bee suit. I don''t think requeening is going to help once the AHB''s take hold. They will mate with the European queen anyway and she will lay brood with the AHB gene.
I don''t believe though that she has AHB''s if they are in the trash can and she and her husband are around it. They would be rather defensive of that can.
Steve
Sheila
#16 Posted : Friday, December 05, 2003 8:02:30 PM
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Um, he''s around it, Steve--not me. That allergy thing. But no, they''re docile. If they weren''t I don''t believe it would be worth the risk to keep them around.
skruzich
#17 Posted : Saturday, December 06, 2003 12:33:26 AM
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i am assuming you live in a area where the temp doesn''t often dip below 60 degrees. They will need to be moved into a hive if you want to keep them and harvest honey. The trash can will work but you have no way of excluding the queen from the honey storage areas and she will lay brood anywhere there is space to lay them.
If he wants to do beekeeping as a hobby, go get a book called, The beekeepers Handbook by diana, sammataro.
Also go to www.beesource.com and look at some stuff there. He can buy a hive or build one or just find a apiary nearby and they will probably sell him one, just make sure the hive is either new or if used has never had Foul Brood in it.
It is a cool hobbie! Also benefits you with pollination and honey, pollen, and propolis even royal jelly if your so inclined to harvest. Lots of good stuff for you!
steve
Terri
#18 Posted : Saturday, December 06, 2003 1:45:06 AM
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Here''s a cheerful thought. My allergist tells me that my bee allergy is actually a yellowjacket allergy. Apparently the venom is different enough so that I do not react to honey bees at all! Are you *SURE* that you are allergic to honeybees?

So, I an the process of starting with bees.....[:o)]
skruzich
#19 Posted : Saturday, December 06, 2003 2:38:19 AM
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there are folks that harvest bee venom to sell to doctors to use in arthritus treatments, cancer treatments, and many other kinds of problems. I know that when i get stung, my arthritus in my hands goes away for about a week or so.
steve
Sheila
#20 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 3:19:31 AM
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Thanks everyone:
Terri--yes, we''re certain it''s bees. But thanks for bringing up a good point.
Steve--I''ve heard of that. Saw something on the TV not too long ago about a woman with MS (I think it was MS) who was benefiting from bee venom therapy. I''m sure my stiff hands would appreciate it, if it weren''t for that pesky ol anaphylatctic shock.
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