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dropkick
#1 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 4:17:59 AM
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What subjects are you looking for help on?

Animals?
Recycling?
Solar?
Building?
Septic?

The people in these forums are always happy to help by answering any questions you might have.
mikeg
#2 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 3:03:53 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Welcome, there is a lot of information here and there are several sites like this. Ones I would recomend are www.homestead.org and www.homesteadingtoday.com
domi
#3 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 11:12:00 PM
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Posts: 134,494
I would like to tanks the to of you for your answers.I am mostly looking for knowledge on the art of doing thing by my self,like raising bigger animal(PIGS MILKCOW HORSE)butchering making soap.I''d loveto get sheep but don''t know what to do whit the whoolor should i say don''t know howt to get it off the sheep!!!Iwill be looking for info on the site address you gave me.Tanks again.DOMI
macloudd
#4 Posted : Saturday, October 18, 2003 1:30:52 PM
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Posts: 134,494
You shear wool off of sheep,basically give them a buzz cut,but do it in the spring,I recently shaved my beard of 25+ years off,and it''s now growing back because of the colder days we are having,my chin just flat out didn''t like the cold and I am sure a sheep would fare no better than my poor chin did.
johnhagen
#5 Posted : Sunday, October 19, 2003 1:12:57 PM
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Hello glad you are here, two acres are not enough room for a cow but milk goats would work and pork would be fine also.I have both just tell me wich one you go with as we raise, milk and butcher almost every thig we have here on the farm.
domi
#6 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 12:40:57 AM
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Posts: 134,494
Hello John,tanks for your replie.Iwould like to raise a pig fisrt ,but i don''t know how to keep it.I already have halfof my land enclose whit sheep gate(?),but i''m not certain that it will be strong enoughtfor a pig.What kind of shelter does it need?I already butcher my rabbit and my chicken but a pig is quite bigger,does it need special skills to butcher such a big animal?How much land does it take to keep a cow.Would it be possible to keep if i bougt all of the hay(?)(FOIN IN FRENCH)(I am not sure of the word hay)I ''d love to have a JERSEY it''s my long time dream.Tanks again and to the pleasureof reading you again.DOMI
skruzich
#7 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 1:38:11 AM
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Killing a pig has to be done a certain way to prevent it from getting a adrenaline rush so to speak, otherwise the meat will taste awful. Not sure how to do it though. I know that you can figure 1 cow per acre in the southeast. Depending on how much vegitation you have in your area, will determine how many cows you can have. I do remember having 4 cows on 2 acres at my grandfathers, but 1 of those was a beef we were fattening up, and the other three were 1 milk cow and 2 heifers.
Jersey cows are the best for good tasting milk,they are probably the highest cream producers too. Hay is way too expensive to feed continuously unless you cut your own.
You can keep a beef in a small pen, i think we had a 20 x40 pen for our beef. The idea is to keep it sedentary so that it will gain weight and get fat. Start with a bull calf and neuter it. Feed it milk for six months, the start feeding it a sweetfeed with NO additives added to it. Some feeds add urea to the feed. Don''t get this type of feed.
Feed it sweetfeed and milk for six months then take to slaughter, and you will have some of the finest tasting beef you have ever eaten!
Steve
domi
#8 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 2:47:54 AM
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Hay is not that expensive here.Cost about 120 for a ton(about 50 bale)don''t know how much a cow would eat in a year but it would probably be possible for me to buy it.I do have one problem,almost all of JERSEY cow in my area are out of price,because few person still have then and those who have then use then for show.I ask around and was told that if i whant one to be ready to pay for(8000$)that a lot of money !!!the kind i don''t possed.So i will continu to dream of it.But i still could buy a calf for the beef.Tanks for the tips,i will probably try at it next spring.DOMI
dropkick
#9 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 3:26:02 AM
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Have you thought about goats instead of cows?
If you just want milk, goats are a better way to go.

Also if you do raise a hog, you will need to have someone who is experienced at killing and butchering with you when you do the first one. You will need someone to help in any case.

P.S. Don''t believe the people who say that the hog needs to be stuck when living. My family has always shot hogs (.22) and then drained the blood, there is no difference in the meat (though the brain might be destroyed - we don''t eat it).
skruzich
#10 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 4:03:03 AM
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Why not just go buy a jersey calf and raise it. You can get them at auction.
You can get a jersey heifer for around 800 here, and a calf for around 200

Dropkick, Jersey milk is better than goats milk! 1/3 - 1/2 turns into cream MmmmmMMM
muzzelloader45
#11 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 1:44:46 PM
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you have a number of problems to work on. first you have a very small area to work with.this would sugesset that you stick with the smaller livestock, chickens rabbits so on. the first big problem with large animals such as cows is the waste removal and smell. when you are that close to your animals it is not verey sanitary. cattel can be kept in a small area but it is not verey humain . you soon have a dust bowl in the summer and a mud hole in the spring or during times of heavey rain annd all so winter time snow tends to become a iced up mud hole. the waste and manure can be used for your garden but you will soon find that in a small area such as your even one cow will soon over produce and you will not be able to use all that manure.next problem is the overall cost of maintaining a cow in a small area is a good deal more than you may think even if you are able to get hay and feed at a good price you will have to purchas feed year round as you will not have the room for pasture. you will allso need a means of keeping fresh watter before the animal this is a must for proper health of a cow. so the answer to your problem is small animals or more land. p.s. I am speaking from experience I was born and raised on an old fasioned farm and know what this is all about I never lived on a place that had electricity untill I was 13 years old. but do not be dicouraged I can allso tell you that there is no better life than living in the countrey.lots of luck.
skruzich
#12 Posted : Monday, October 20, 2003 10:27:36 PM
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i agree muzzellman, I too lived on a farm for alot of my younger life, but my grandfather had 2 or 3 acres i think, with a year round creek running through it. we grew a 1/2 acre garden and used the other two acres for cows and chickens and goats. the house set across the creek from the garden on the other 1/2 acre along with some blueberry bushes, apple trees and other stuff.
Never had a problem with over production of manure, it dried, I grabbed pitchfork and wheelbarrow, and i picked them up and hauled to compost pile.
That winter, we spread manure all over garden area. then tilled it under in february.

IF your raising a beef they do tend to do better in a covered pen. We had a semi covered area, where they didn''t have to stay out in the rain and elements, and could get in dry area. Feed and water was stored in dry area.

The milk cows though just wandered the couple acres, found a tree to stand under to get out of rain.
steve
domi
#13 Posted : Tuesday, October 21, 2003 12:15:59 AM
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I use to have mini goat,ten in total.but i sold then because they were of no use(NO MILK NO MEAT)i think i could manage a cow.My piece of land make abuot 78000sqf half of it enclose and i made a separation in the midle(TWO PASTURE?)before it was lush grassthat we use to mow.On the other half i have a garden quite large some strawberry,raspberry and 7apple trees.I all so have building for each kind (laying hen 1 rabbit 1 the rest 1)I''m on a well quite good rarely did we went dry.I''m almost surround it by farmers and ochards so as for the smels we are use to it(PIGS!!!)As for the manure i have lots of friend and family who allready ask for it for there garden or flowers beds.I''mcurrently looking for a biiger place but land isnt cheap.In the mean while i hoppe to do the best whit what i got.tanks for the replies guys.TRY to do my best.DOMI
skruzich
#14 Posted : Tuesday, October 21, 2003 12:59:19 AM
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1.8 acres of land. You might be able to handle a cow if you have plenty of grass. Only thing i see is if you are thinking about a jersey cow, Your going to need a barn, they won''t winter well in canada. They need to be in shelter in the cold months that you get up there.
steve
domi
#15 Posted : Tuesday, October 21, 2003 1:56:55 AM
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I allready have a barn but i''m not shure that it is big enougth for a cow.Itis about 16X20 ft.I use to keep my goats in it.what do you think,is''it big enought,or should i built an extention to it.
dropkick
#16 Posted : Thursday, October 23, 2003 7:46:59 AM
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There are only 3 reasons that you ever need a barn for a cow; milking, medical and extreme cold weather. A small lean-to is nice (but not necessary) for wind and sun protection.
You will need someplace to store hay that is protected and the cow can''t get to.
domi
#17 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 1:51:08 AM
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Posts: 134,494
I have a place for the hay.Could someone tell me how much a cow would eat aproximatlyin a year.Does my barn fit as for the size and for the pig ,does the fence fit?What does it eat?Do i keep it inside or out?At what age do i butcher it?If i buy a young cow how much time does it take for it to be an adult and to be ready for milking?OR can someone recomand a good book on the subject,clear and easy to understand.If it is too technical,i might not be able use it.Because i can read english in general but not much of the technical stuf. Tanks in advance for answers from all of you out there.It''s allways a pleasure for me to come read my new answers.I felt accepted right away.Tanks again.DOMI
skruzich
#18 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 2:25:25 AM
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You don''t butcher cows. You milk cows ;) You buy a 3 day old bull calf, then neuter it, and feed it milk for 6 months. Then feed it milk and sweetfeed for another 6 months then butcher it.
Takes about 1 year for the heiffer to get to a big enough size for breeding, and you would want to wait til her second heat. That will make sure she is big enough to handle a birth.
That is what my grandfather used to do.
Not sure how much your cow will eat as far as hay. Ijust don''t remember. Pigs eat just about anything, feed them lots of sour milk, (hint get from grocery store when it goes out of date). Usually you get pigs in spring and butcher in november i think.
steve
Robert Hendrix
#19 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 5:22:52 AM
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Steves time frame on raising hogs (for slaughter) sounds about right.
I really don''t know too much about farm animals,I''m one generation removed from the farm.
I do know from some of the locals that you feed sausage on the hoof whatever you can afford while the corn is growing.Once the corn comes in,you feed them that to fatten them up for slaughter.
One of my local customers raised hogs until the drought caused the costs to go high because he had to buy corn to feed them.
I was over at his place working on a tactor about feeding time one day.He was picking up out of date sandwiches from a company that stocks convience stores and the like for feed at that time.He had three hogs in the pen.One would pick out the meat from the sandwiches,one wouldn''t eat anything but the bread and veggies,and the other one would eat anything thrown at him.Hearing those hogs fight over their favorites was somewhat amusing.Glad to say it didn''t bother me at all when I bought some sausage from him that year.[}:)]
If I wasn''t so soft hearted to animals I''d like to make some sausage one day after retirement but I just couldn''t feed them everyday and then slaughter them.[V]
Robert.
dropkick
#20 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 8:02:58 AM
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Had to do some research, as while I grew up around cattle I never owned a milk cow.
I did have a beef cow that we kept at a neighbor’s ranch when I was four, but that ended badly... in the fall my cow ran away. When I got a bit older I did have some suspicions about where all those white packages I had helped Dad load into the freezer that fall had come from...

Anyway I came up with these answers and a few other things for you to know.

You don''t breed a milk cow until it is 2 years old (so no milk for first 2 years).

It will produce milk for about 10 months, and then it needs to be dry for 2 months, to prepare for birth.

The milk can not be sold for 72 to 96 hours after the birth, the colostrum (milk) produced during this time (over what the calf needs) can be stored and used to feed the calf later - saving milk for your use.

A milk cow will produce between 3 to 10 gallons of milk a day, depending on the breed of cow and other conditions (time of year, feed, etc.)

In winter it will eat around 30 pounds of hay a day, about 1/2 a bale, plus 3 pounds of grain.

It will drink 12 gallons of fresh water a day.

If you want to get a calf cheap, try a dairy farm in the spring.
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