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Dairy Livestock Options
patrick46135
#21 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 1:11:15 PM
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In Indiana it is illegal to buy raw milk, even for pet food. It''s even illegal to give it away. You can''t even get some for an abadoned calf from a neighbor by law. There is a group fighting to change the law here, and of course there a few loopholes but the state is starting to crack down on those.
skruzich
#22 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 2:56:15 PM
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Thats the dairy industry doing that. There is nothing wrong with raw milk if you keep your animals healthy.
Galeshka
#23 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 8:05:39 PM
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I don''t really have a problem with that since I intend to use the milk for the family....Patrick, do you know if it''s illegal to sell raw milk products as well? I pick up raw milk cheese from a stand up by Rockville several times.

Be well......
skruzich
#24 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 8:30:54 PM
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Raw milk won''t hurt anyone unless the cow is sick. If she is sick, then you don''t need to be drinking the milk even if it is pasturized!
Best to be feeding it to the animals if you get a sick cow.
Steve
patrick46135
#25 Posted : Friday, August 29, 2003 1:36:09 PM
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Steve,
I agree with you, I love raw milk. I was just letting Galeshka know about or state laws as they stand at the moment.

patrick46135
#26 Posted : Friday, August 29, 2003 1:40:22 PM
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Galeshka,
I''m not sure about cheeses and such. I just remember listening in at a sustainable farm conferance about the milk issue. I gathered from them that what started the movement to try to legalize the raw milk sales came from a cow share program (farmer takes care of animals and milks them, other people own cow and pick up milk from farmer)being shut down by the state.
skruzich
#27 Posted : Friday, August 29, 2003 2:21:01 PM
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The issue at hand about raw milk is that there is a bacteria that causes the sleeping sickness, I think encephlacia. That is why they started pasturizing the milk in the beginning. The large dairy farms do not keep their cattle healthy and all the milk goes into one container which mixes any tainted product with the good.

If you have a small farm, the chances of this are slim to none as most farmers keep their milk cows very healthy and when they are sick they throw the milk out.

Its just that there is govt regulations concerning this and the dairy industry does not want you to go to a outside source for your milk. They have effectively brainwashed alot of people concerning this. I had a uncle that worked for the dairy industry and he found out that i was drinking raw milk as a kid and he had a fit, worried that i was going to die from it.
Steve
StreetLegal
#28 Posted : Friday, August 29, 2003 7:23:11 PM
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Sick milk cows are immediately taken out of service until they are healthy again. Dairymen cannot afford to do otherwise, `cause they won''t get away with it.

The bad milk does not go into the human food supply. If contaminated milk gets into "the system", the "clean-up" cost and cost of downtime is enormous. Plus, the testing labs are testing to parts per million levels. Even a small amount of bacteria will contaminate thousands of gallons of good milk.

Raw milk is tested for bacteria numerous times before it is bottled. It gets tested at the dairy before it is put into a tanker-truck.

The trucking company does not want to carry bad milk in their tankers because it contaminates their tanks, and that is a big (expensive) hassle to get the tank cleaned and re-certified.

The tankers deliver the milk to a processing plant or a cheese plant, where it is tested again...`cause those folks don''t want their processing plant contaminated for all the same reasons.

And a USDA inspecter is right there at every step monitoring the results...and they weild a big stick.

From the moment it leaves the cow to the moment you open the container, milk is never touched by human hands nor is it exposed to outside air...or so they say. Milk is one of the cleanest foods you can buy.

Got beer?? :)
Dorene
#29 Posted : Saturday, August 30, 2003 4:07:01 PM
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The government is heavily involved in every area of farming and it is very hard for someone to regulate an industry they don''t understand by what so called "experts" say. Someone down around here went into the goat dairy business. They built a building and started producing cheese. The dairy industry is very heavily federal controlled and they didn''t check their laws very well before they started this. (Not bright.) Goat milk does not need to be pasturized but the government made it so difficult for them to try to start up that they just sell their cheese as pet food. I am seriously interested in goats for personal use, too, both for the milk and for the fact that they will replace a lawnmower and eat a lot of weeds that other animals won''t touch. I''ve even heard they will eat poison ivy. The fact that they are smaller than me helps make them more attractive and transportable.
skruzich
#30 Posted : Sunday, August 31, 2003 3:15:53 AM
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Dorene, all the reasons you give are excellent, except one. Transporting the goats. When they don''t want to be transported, you will be hard pressed to find any more stubborn animal on the earth! ;)
hehe
steve
Dorene
#31 Posted : Sunday, August 31, 2003 6:57:19 PM
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You haven''t met me!
andydufresne
#32 Posted : Monday, September 01, 2003 9:44:04 AM
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My Grandmother once decided to raise goats. She rasied many goats...sold them off one or two at at time. THEN ONE DAY... a guy came out picked out the goat he wanted and then began to tell her how great this particular goat would be when roasted. She refused to sell to him and shortly thereafter got out of the goat business. Ya gotta love grandmothers!
CntryLvnGrl
#33 Posted : Sunday, November 02, 2003 9:14:08 PM
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How many do you want to feed off of your milk cow. A nice angus cross w/ holstien or swiss will milk great, have seen some girls put out 80 - 100 pounds a day. The benifit of the beef cow is the off spring then can be raised and butchered for the freezer. If you continue to milk her you can feed calf and family off of the cow. Have fun hope ya find the right "girl".
aeaea
#34 Posted : Saturday, November 22, 2003 1:07:10 AM
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My Dad milked cows with my grandfather untill I was about 8 or so and when I was 10 Dad bought some cows and started milking again. In between having dairy cows we once we had one cow dad milked by hand. Dad and the cow didn''t get along very well; I could hear a whole string of adjectives if i was even near the barn while dad was milking. Soon Dad put the cow in a pen with 4 or 5 calves. The calves were happy to milk her.

Anyways if your going to milk a cow get a gentle one and be paient and gentle with her.
We milked only Holstiens I liked their milk. You had to drink your milk fairly quick however, because if you didn''t all the cream wouold float to the top and it would have to be stirred.

Cows are very thirsty animals so give them lots of water to drink.
Galeshka
#35 Posted : Saturday, November 22, 2003 1:07:10 AM
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Yup, it's me again[:I]. My grandfather kept a great deal of livestock on the farm when we kids were growing up, but he always said he didn't have the time for 'milking stock'. As my spouse and I plan for our new place one of the things I very much want to consider is having a cow or two for milking and I would like to have some opinions on the best milking cows......both for quality of milk and temperament. I've always had a soft spot for Guernseys but there are also Jerseys, Dexters, etc....
Having at least one goat for milking would also be necessary as my oldest son cannot tolerate cows milk; and I know nuttin' about goats other than a couple of breed names......and the fact that a friend of mine has 'fainting' goats, lol.
Information, or being pointed in the right direction would be greatly appreciated......lol, the way things are going I might end up having to invite everyone over for a picnic once we have our place[8)] especially considering some of the recipes which have been posted, but in that case let me have a chance to order in a gross of wheel barrows before holding me to my word......

Be well........
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