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Dairy Livestock Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 12:51:42 AM
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Jersey cows milk is probably the best tasting milk that i know of. They have a extremely high cream content. We used to get 1 1/2 gallons of cream out of a 5 gallon milking. Makes for some great butter. Plus grandpa used to sell the buttermilk off to local folks.
I love buttermilk butter! ;)

Goats are wonderful for milk, grandma had some nubian goats that she milked and raised.
They are small and very easy to handle. Just a bit stubborn though.
steve
majere
#2 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 1:37:27 AM
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Ach!

TheLitterBox server is down, I am still waiting for a reply as to why.

The reason for this post is that the Farmers Cyclopedia of Agriculture''s web version is being built, and that would certainly be a work thee could use, Galeshka. Michael is working on that one as it is so popular. Anything and everything one could wish to know on such. Just be a little patient, and it will be finished. I think he is up to the ''H''s of the index, and has about three hundred more pages to go.

Take care,

Majere



Galeshka
#3 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 2:43:37 AM
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It will be very useful Majere, again I must thank you. As for patience...my granny had a wonderful saying about patience: If, while waiting, one works patience becomes a virtue easily obtained. Odd how much more wise one''s parents and grandparents become as one grows older *smiles*. My dear spouse has also taught me a great deal about patience; when he emigrated to this very rural area he came from a city (Glasgow) in another country, and completely unable to drive. I''ve taught him how to drive on a manual shift (with only a few gray hairs to show for it, lol)and now that he has fallen in love with the country life I am teaching what I remember from working with my grandfather on the farm.
Much has changed in the years since my grandfather passed on; and he was unaware of sustainable agriculture practices, etc... I''ve also forgotten a great deal since that time; I''ve a tremendous amount of learning to do before we begin in earnest but I look forward to the challenge. *smiling*

Be well.....
patrick46135
#4 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 3:32:21 PM
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Galeshka,
I bet your grandfather knew more about sustainable practices than you think. They just weren''t called that back then.
My Great grandmother is still alive (98) and laughs about our sustainable practices all the time. She will tell us "that''s how we always farmed when I was growing up". I''ve found that the older generations are a wealth of info that the rest of us and the agribusiness industry has forgotten.
skruzich
#5 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 3:47:13 PM
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I am lucky i guess, i grew up every summer on my grandfathers farm, and he was within a hour of where i lived so i got to participate in alot of the farm activities during hte year. One thing i remember is that during the non growing season, which was alot of the times november to march, he threw everything on to the garden and just let it lay there. Not pine tree branches or things like that just plant material, and things like that. Also took all the cow patties we found in the field and scooped them up into the wheelbarrow (Which i have outside to this day ) and pile it up on the garden, and then in February, we would till all of that under with the troybuilt. Wouldn''t hve to go more than 6" under with it. This built up every year. When my grandmother sold the place, I remember seeing the garden area had been built up over 3 feet thick in black soil. I remember Grandpa grew a 45 pound turnip out of that garden one year, and I don''t know how many 100- 120 pound watermelons came out of there too.

Steve
Galeshka
#6 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 8:06:48 PM
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Patrick, I would like to agree with you on that but my grandfather fell in love with ''modern'' methods of farming early on.....he was heavily into using chemical fertilizers and weed/pest controls from the time they first became available in the area, and his sons have continued in his footsteps. I wonder if the family farm will ever recover.....*sigh*. Since none of my brothers has the slightest interest in farming (which is why I was always the one helping my grandfather, lol) and the family doesn''t believe in leaving land to women it is unlikely I shall ever find out.

Be well.....
skruzich
#7 Posted : Sunday, August 24, 2003 11:09:08 PM
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It would take many years to reclaim the land from the chemicals. I don''t know if it ever can truely recover totally.

I would love to have 5 - 10 acres myself, just don''t ever expect to be able to get that much land due to the initial cost and being able to pay the taxes.

TTYL
steve
andydufresne
#8 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 2:07:06 AM
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Galeshka:

FIVER ACRES AND INDEPENDENCE- says that cows require an acre of grazing land each. OR you will spend more in feed than they will provide. Something to think about.
Galeshka
#9 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 2:49:32 AM
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Very much something to keep in mind...and yet another book to add to my wish list. Good thing I love to read *smiles*

Be well.....
andydufresne
#10 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 4:23:44 AM
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That book was written in 1935 and revised in 1940 so a lot of the numbers are out of date but the basic info is good.

skruzich
#11 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 4:41:19 AM
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The acre a cow is still a good standard. I think down here in Georgia, you can get away with two per acre since we have a long growing season here.
steve
Galeshka
#12 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 5:10:41 AM
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Much of our future plans will depend on how much land we want to/can purchase.......then again, how much land will be determined by how we wish to use it. I have a very short window of time before I am once again working long hours and will be unable to post and read as much.(lol, I''m sure it will be a relief) I have enough knowledge to be, as the saying goes, dangerous; ANYthing is helpful and appreciated.

Be well......
StreetLegal
#13 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 5:27:23 AM
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Well...in most parts of New Mexico, the "one cow per acre" rule-of-thumb can be thrown out the window...try 20 to 30 acres per. As bad as it is here, it is a lot better than in Nevada.

Check with your county extension agent...he can probably tell you what the carrying capacity is for your area, usually measured in "animal units". A cow is one animal unit. (I think) 5 sheep equals one animal unit.

And I agree with Steve...Jersy milk is waaaaaaayyyy better than the others!
Galeshka
#14 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 10:43:25 AM
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Around here it would be slightly less than one acre, but not enough to matter, lol. I''m reading the archives'' material about goats now and it may be better to keep 2-3 goats, if anyone has any info. about the calcium content of goat''s milk as opposed to cow''s it would be greatly appreciated. :-)
You''re right Street, checking with the county extension agent would be extremely helpful...and since we went to school together, catching up on old times would be very pleasant.

Be well......
skruzich
#15 Posted : Monday, August 25, 2003 3:02:15 PM
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My chiropractor told me the other day that this country has the highest incidence of osteoporosis and people consume more milk in this country that should supply the necessary calcium to combat this.
Our bodies are not assimilating the calcium due to the pasturization and homoginization of our milk products. If you can get raw milk it will make a difference, if you can''t it won''t do much for you.
Steve
StreetLegal
#16 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 12:26:45 AM
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It is my understanding that it is illegal to sell milk that has not been pastuerized (heated), so finding un-pastuerized milk might be near impossible.

As much as I enjoy whole Jersey milk and cream, the thought of milking every day certainly doesn''t appeal to me.
skruzich
#17 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 3:06:15 AM
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Not really, it can be sold as pet milk. ;D
Galeshka
#18 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 3:31:12 AM
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Actually, it''s more for the rest of the family than me, I can''t have much calcium in my diet....have a li''l problem with the parathyroid gland which causes it to do unpleasant things like cause kidney stones, seizures, even a stroke. So, methinks the kids will be learning to milk...it will be good for them to work for what they eat and give them a real sense of satisfaction that I remember from when I was a kid. Of course, being kids it will take them a long time to realize that they find it satisfying....and even longer to actually admit it!

Be well........
andydufresne
#19 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 4:17:36 AM
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I think the idea of goats is a good one. They could do double duty clearing areas out and providing milk.
Galeshka
#20 Posted : Thursday, August 28, 2003 12:02:36 PM
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My thoughts exactly Andy,less polluting than a mower or bush hog and the ''end'' products will be a good deal more beneficial to my garden, lol.

Be well.........
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