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HOW MUCH should a tree cost? Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Tuesday, June 24, 2003 1:56:37 AM
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Hey andy,
Check www.lawyernursery.com. They have them and you have to call for availability. The
latin name for the tree is PRUNUS-LAPINS(LAPINS CHERRY)

Now here is one that is similar to that type of tree, just to give you an idea on prices
PRUNUS-LAMBERT (LAMBERT CHERRY) (AVIUM)
Zone 5. Strong upright tree bears heavy crops of dark red heart shaped fruit. Resistant to late spring frost. Ripens late June to mid-July. Pollinator needed.
GRADE/AGE SIZE AVAILABLE BUNDLE BDL+ 50+ 100+ 250+
STANDARD (1-0) 5/16" 5 5 $6.90 $6.20 $5.50 $5.20
STANDARD (1-0) 9/16" 12 5 $9.95 $8.95 $7.95 $7.45
andydufresne
#2 Posted : Tuesday, June 24, 2003 2:48:15 AM
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Thanks Steve

I don''t think that it will be time to plant until winter so I''ll ask about price then. The one Lapins I''d found on the net cost over $50. It was a big one but that is real pricey if you are trying to cover a quarter acre or more. According to one site for cherry, and plum trees you should have 108 trees per acre. For apple, peach and pear trees 48 per acre. If I do things right I intend for the cut wood to pay for the fruit trees. I''ve found fruit trees nearby for about the same as those cherry trees but that nursery didn''t sell any kind of cherry trees.

skruzich
#3 Posted : Tuesday, June 24, 2003 2:09:22 PM
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If you look at that price list, look at the size of the trees ;) 5/16" tree is the first size and 9/16" is the second. If you want 108 or so trees, then They will cost you 5.50 for the 5/16" and 7.98 for the 9/16" They aren''t cheap! I do however think, but ask them first, and don''t hold me to the fire on this, but i THINK that they have 5 - 10 trees in a bundle. and those prices are for a bundle.
steve
andydufresne
#4 Posted : Tuesday, June 24, 2003 3:58:44 PM
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Yeah, Steve...I got that....ONE LAPINS at a web site that will go unmentioned was over 50 bucks....I KNEW there had to be a better way than that.

About the bundles that was the way I read it too. I was having trouble finding prices cause most of the nurserys have stopped shipphing till fall or winter. Most transplants don''t weather the summer very well.

skruzich
#5 Posted : Tuesday, June 24, 2003 9:55:02 PM
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The ONLY way i have ever gotten a transplanted tree to not die when i plant them in the spring or early summer is to put them in 5 gallon buckets and place them in a shaded area til the fall. That way I can water them and know when i have watered them enough plus i have a pvcpipe that is about 30 feet long and three rows of pipes, each pipe has a trickle flow nipple every 2 1/2 feet where the bucket will set, and i just turn it on for about a hour or two and then shut it off. I only have to water every other day in the summer that way.
Its a great way to get the trees well on their way. The other way is to create a mulch bed, about 1 1/2 foot deep, and whatever size you need, I make one usually about 10 x 20 and then plant the trees about 6" apart til they get about 1 foot tall. Then transplant them in the fall of the year they get that tall.
Right now though, i am working on getting the materials to build me a garage/house on my other property, and it is loaded with hardwood trees. I am going to have to cut a bunch just to get some sunlight in there and to stop mold from growing. I think i am going to leave the southern trees standing, so that my house won''t get too hot in summer, and cut the trees to the north of the house and use that area for gardening, and planging fruit bearing trees along my 500'' of road frontage. I figure i am going to plant 50 Hawthorn trees along the road, Then plant three rows in a arc behind the hawthorns, of blue berry bushes. I figure i will plant a couple apple trees and pear trees near the house, and I plan on planting a row along the driveway, of alternating wild plum tree and dogwood tree. That will be awesome looking with the purple looking tree with the white blossoms of the dogwood in between the plums. I can get all the plum trees wild here. Dogwoods too.

Somewhere on this place i plan on putting a nice herb garden, might even have enough room to plant a regular garden too. ;)
Oh well nice dreams aren''t they ;)
steve
andydufresne
#6 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 3:06:29 AM
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SOUNDS GOOD!

I have 10 redwoods on the way here and I am going to do what you just talked about with them...except I will water the bottom of the pot. The guy I am buying them from recommended that. He said they will be 5" when I get them and 15" next spring. I can keep them potted one or two years. Planning all this stuff sure is fun. I hope the work goes easy and the result is worth it all. My books on fruit trees will be here in 2 days...a special weeding hoe about the same time and the redwoods too. Gonna be a good weekend.
skruzich
#7 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 5:23:54 AM
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Ok if you do the method i am doing make sure that you do this.
Take a drill with a 1/2" bit, and drill 5 or 6 holes in the bottom.
Take rivergravel about 1" in diameter and cover the bottom 3" deep.
Take and dig up 1/2 bucket of normal soil around your property, and 1/2 bucket of rich potting soil and mix well. take 2-3" of sand and pour over the rocks, and then put this potting soil mix on top of that. Plant your tree in this, and make sure that you only go about 1" no more than 2" over the top of the roots. Make sure you heap the soil over the top of the bucket cause it will pack down when you water it. Make sure to saturate the soil after you position your tree in the pot and pat the soil down.

The rock and the sand will stop the soil from becoming soggy, and will allow for a slow drainage keeping the potting soil at the right moisture.
You can build a watering rod, for lack of better words out of a piece of pvc pipe, with several t-fittings, and caps. cut your pipe into sections, and insert into the two connections on the T that will give you a straight pipe, then cut pieces for the down part of the T (about 2") and put the caps on it. Before putting the caps on, take a 1/8" drill bit and drill a hole in the center of the cap, and then glue it on the fitting.
Take one end of the pipe, and cap it off, and the other end put a fitting on it that you can attach to your hose from your water spigot. Turn your water spigot on only allowing so much pressure into the pipe so that you get a steady stream of water out of the pipe but one that won''t dig a hole into the soil. Now if you use a 1/32 bit, you can drill several holes in the caps, and create a misting type of waterer which will soak the soil pretty good.

If you have trouble making one, I could probably put one together for you and ship it to you. It is really easy to make though.
steve
andydufresne
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 2:12:52 PM
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I think I can do that....the fellow selling me the trees suggested that I water from the bottom up if I could...said to make the roots search for water....that the worst thing that could happen would be to keep so much moisture in the pot that the roots could go sideways but would not have to go down. He said in his part of CA there is very little rain between May and Nov so drought would not be much of a concern. The initial pots have drain holes so I have that covered....I MAY move them next spring into 5 gallon buckets in which case I will have to creat the drain holes. Much of that depends on how far a long I am clearing the land and if I think I have a permanent spot picked out yet.


I like your idea, Steve. I think it might be a good way to water the orchard. I want a drip irrigatin type thing. My intent is to so the whole area in clover and drip irrigate around the root line of the trees. I wonder if your idea but replacing the "rods" with black plastic hose and putting very small holes in it as it circles the tree would do well?
skruzich
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 8:00:47 PM
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Hey andy, the black plastic pipe that we use for well water would work fine, only get fittings to do the spray. make them out of the t''s. That way you can angle them to set the spray off the ground. I used to live out in west colorado and we used to have to pay so much for water that we used low volume watering methods. I still use that method even here in georgia where we have plenty of water. It just makes more sense.
steve
andydufresne
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 8:43:08 PM
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Do I really WANT a spray? I thought that a small drip soaking into the earth was better for trees.
skruzich
#11 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 9:49:14 PM
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Misting is always better for getting your plants to grow. I know, that you can take and put your water on a timer, mist for 7 seconds every minute, and you use very little water. I don''t remember the figures but it is very minute amount. And your plants do better in a misting environment. I know this is the way the greenhouses get cuttings to grow roots. If you use the mist method, you will saturate the ground as well as keep your plants hydrated.
Now if you want to use the drip method, you will need to figure out what pressure your water needs to be at to keep from digging a hole in the ground. Now here is a idea i didn''t think of, Take a piece of pvc pipe and drill a half a dozen holes about 1/8" on the pipe on one end. Slide this end down into the bottom of the bucket, and attach the top to the pvc T. That will water your plants from the bottom. I think the soil will draw the water up to the top or close to it. You would only need to water for about 5 min, using this method. I don''t know theres so many ways you could do it. I know if you have young growth trees, the misting is much better to get them to grow.
You may even have to place plastic over the tops of the buckets like a tent or a cold box. That way it will create a humid environment being out in cali. It would keep the plants hydrated and if you had a timer on the line, you could do it saving money on water.

Steve
andydufresne
#12 Posted : Wednesday, June 25, 2003 11:09:51 PM
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For the redwoods I will only have 10 of those and only in containers for 1 or 2 years. I think I''ll look at the drip thing for the orchard as I start planting it early next year.
skruzich
#13 Posted : Thursday, June 26, 2003 12:26:46 AM
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Try to make one and hook it up to your water hose. I don''t know how much pressure you will have going out to the orchard. You might have to run a 3" pipe out the lenght of the orchard and use taps into that pipe to run to your rings or the line that waters the rows. The 3" pipe will give you enough pressure and keep it steady. You want to make sure that you get the most out of your water being in california. You can also do it this way, dig irrigation ditches around each tree, creating a burm around the trees, and then a inlet for the water to flow in. Route all of these ditches to tie in together, and then feed that main ditch with water. It will soak and saturate the ground. Since you live in such a arid area of the country, you really don''t want to spray your water in the air as it will evaporate before it hits the ground. Assuming that you live in the southern half or the dry areas of cali
:)
steve
andydufresne
#14 Posted : Thursday, June 26, 2003 3:24:03 AM
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OOPS mistake I am in Arkansas.....no CA. Ordered the trees from CA.
skruzich
#15 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2003 3:16:14 AM
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LOL OOOhh Ok :)
sorry
andydufresne
#16 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2003 4:57:11 AM
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I got an email back from the lawyer nursery folks. I think I''ll be able to do business with them.
skruzich
#17 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2003 10:39:13 PM
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hey thats a good thing.
Look if you place a order with them, How about placing a order for me to combign with yours. I am looking to get about 20 washington hawthorns but they require a minimum purchase. If you were to order the 20 for me and i pay for those plus the shipping from your place to mine would you do that?
steve
andydufresne
#18 Posted : Tuesday, July 01, 2003 4:33:45 AM
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Just so that the lurkers aren''t left hanging...Why yes of course, we can work something out.


I just got word today that my redwoods have been shipped. I am looking forward to getting those....I should have them in time to spend the 4th potting them.
andydufresne
#19 Posted : Monday, July 07, 2003 10:39:07 PM
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For those keeping track...I finally got my REDWOODS. Took a week via priority mail due to the holiday and a subsitute carrier. Ten coastal redwoods now reside at The End Of The Road in 5 gallon containers. I''ll keep you posted on how they do. Looks like they will be container grown for 2 years then place into the ground.
andydufresne
#20 Posted : Monday, July 07, 2003 10:39:07 PM
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I am looking to plant some lapins cherry trees. I find that there is a great difference if pricing from one shop to another. Anyone have experience in this? What should I expect to have to pay for this kind of tree. How long after planting till it starts to bear fruit do you have a source for the price of cherries and the # of pounds produced per tree?

Thanks
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