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Insulation suggestions?? Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Wednesday, October 08, 2003 1:57:03 AM
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Have you got any ceiling fans to push the heat back down to the floor?
mikeg
#2 Posted : Wednesday, October 08, 2003 4:10:43 AM
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A lot of those homes are build on a crawel space and you need them to be ventalated to keep the moisture out. If you have one make sure you vent holes have thermostatic lovers. Most concrete block homes have concrete floors which are great in the summer but radiate the cool in winter too. My parents solved this with carpet and thick pad. Don''t know which you have but if it is either one of these this may help.
Welcome to the forum
skruzich
#3 Posted : Wednesday, October 08, 2003 4:18:41 AM
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I would think if you have a concrete floor, putdown wood tile, and cover with throw rugs. Putting carpet down is not good for health. Traps too much dust, mites and other nasties as well as introduceds formaldehyde and other nasty chems into your environment.
steve
andydufresne
#4 Posted : Wednesday, October 08, 2003 5:08:22 AM
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OK Steve, I like you but that is just not true. SOME people have ALLERGIES or SENSITIVITIES to materials in carpeting but MILLIONS of us live on carpeting. Industry tests have shown that OFF-GASSING has finished withing 48 hours. I can''t speak to your own families sensitivities but I can speak to the majority of the nation. We LIKE carpeting in our homes. If it is maintained well. Vacuumed regularly and cleaned at LEAST annualy it is a very good filter that filters out nasty things from the air.
J.D. Clark
#5 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 8:29:43 PM
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You mention closing the upstairs to keep heat escaping through the roof. You DID insulate the attic, right? Lots and lots of insulation, like 8 inches or more of fiberglass or something equivalent? A house loses most of its heat through the roof. Also,how big is your house and where are you located? Burning 12 cords of wood in one winter seems a little extreme unless you''re heating a mansion or living in the far north or keeping the windows open all winter. :-)

Cash
Lowell Bernhardt
#6 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 11:30:21 PM
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Thanks for the input guys.

As for the house it is over a basement not a slab. And we just laid new carpet. We do have a ceiling fan, starting this season.

And as for the insulation up stairs, yes I did reinsulate. I got as much insulation as I could in a 2x6 joist pocket and still have some room for air circulation in the summer time.

Thanks again,
LOST
crownlady
#7 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 2:28:41 PM
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I have a brick home on a crawl space. I wonder if we can replace the vents that need to be insulated each winter. Also there is a big hole that you jump into and there is a door to the crawl. How do you insulate that big hole and can you build some kind of insulated door leading from the hole to the crawl space. We are built on clay. When it is cold the floors are like ice. We have heavy carpeting and pading. I also wondered about insulating the floors underneath in the crawl space. I heard something about some kind of floor warmers but just bet they would be very expensive. The house was built in the 50''s. It is not trenched around the foundation. We have three sump pumps. I guess the builder just set a sump pump in the lowest levels and that takes care of it. The third one is for an addition. We are not of an age to start digging. A furnace man said it is fine and just to keep the crawl ventelated. I worry...my husband wories about nothing.
skruzich
#8 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 8:47:49 PM
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You don''t want to cover up your vents or you will get mold. Thats whats drying out the crawlspace.
You could however add insulation under the floors. just put bats in between the joists and use wire hangers to hold them in place.
Steve
crownlady
#9 Posted : Saturday, October 18, 2003 1:17:36 AM
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But you would cover and insulate the vents in the winter wouldn''t you. If you left them open then it would be really cold.
skruzich
#10 Posted : Saturday, October 18, 2003 2:05:03 AM
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I don''t ever close mine, it would create a vapor down there, causing mold.
You need a airflow through there to keep the moisture down. You also should have plastic sheeting down under the house there, over the bare ground to create a vapor barrier.
crwmdpmr
#11 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 9:16:30 PM
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One thing you might try to make the
house feel warmer is radiant barrier
paint. Radiant barrier paint can be
used both indoors and out to act like
the film in low E windows does. Alot
of people who live in fabric domes and
tepees use this concept.

See: www.hytechsales.com for this type
of paint. They also make an interesting
additive for flat latex paint they can
be used to fire proof wood.
crwmdpmr
#12 Posted : Thursday, October 30, 2003 11:38:23 PM
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Posts: 134,494
See also: http://www.insuladd.com/
they claim up to a 50% increase
in effective R value with their
additve added to 2 coats of paint.
It seems perfect for you and cost
effective
crwmdpmr
#13 Posted : Monday, November 10, 2003 12:52:53 AM
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Posts: 134,494
Dear Lost,

Have you decided what you
are going to do yet?
CRZ
#14 Posted : Monday, November 10, 2003 1:20:11 AM
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Posts: 134,494
You might take a look at www.countryplans.com - lots of info about insulation and vapor barries. I purchased John Raabe''s book "Superinsulated Design and Construction" a guide to building energy - efficient homes. The ISBN 0-448-26051-2. The book is out of print, but can be purchased USED through www.Amazon.com for about $30.00 + S/H. Amazon handles the tranaction (middle man). Mine arrived on time and in EX+ condition.

I forgot to mention there is a recommended reading list on John''s site. I have all the books on his list. It''s the best investment that I''ve made.

BTW: we''re planning to build next spring.

Good luck, hope this helps!
skruzich
#15 Posted : Monday, November 10, 2003 4:35:36 AM
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Posts: 134,494
Has anyone thought about how insulating the houses airtight causing more health problems for people? You know that if you cause a house not to breath, we end up with more health probs from allergies and viruses that stay in the home instead of the airflow pulling them out.
steve
Lowell Bernhardt
#16 Posted : Monday, November 10, 2003 4:35:36 AM
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Posts: 134,494
Hello all, this is my first post to the MEN message board. My wife and I currently own a 1940's era home. The home is built out of concrete block and is very sturdy. Over the last 3 years we have remodeled extensively. We furred and insulated all of the exterior walls with 3/4" R3 foam board. All of the windows have been replaced with low E and anywhere that we came across insulation we replaced it and up graded it.

Our primary source of heat is a wood stove that is tied into our propane furnace's plenum. On average we burn about 12 cord of firewood a season, and the house stays about 65-70 degrees.

Starting last year we started closing off the up stairs to help slow the heat down going out of the roof.

Anyway, my question is: Our house still seems "chilly" I just chalk it up to the house being concrete block. Can anyone make any suggestions for a solution to my "chilly" house?

Thanks in advance,
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