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cchapman84
#21 Posted : Tuesday, June 20, 2006 3:41:02 AM
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I''m in northern VT. Great place for homesteading with the exception of the price of land. There are still some deals out there, but they''re few and far between. There was recently a parcel for sale with 71 acres on the Canadian border, no road access but an established right-of-way, mountainous type land for $37,000, which is unheard of around here. We''re going to look at a piece of land in the town next to the one we live in that''s 9+ acres for $35,000 with river frontage. Looks pretty rocky, but nice nonetheless. There was a parcel for sale a year or so ago, 15 acres on top of a mountain for $15,000, but it got scooped up before we even had a chance to look at it. The soil is good up here, plenty of rain but not too much (around 40" per year), cold snowy winters, but a decent growing season (especially if you use a cold frame or greenhouse--know of people who grow spinach through February in a greenhouse). Plus, if you make any sort of handcrafted product, you''d be surprised how much extra rich people from out of state will pay for things with the "made in Vermont" label on it!
Sunshine Daydream
#22 Posted : Friday, June 23, 2006 9:21:52 PM
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Hi [:D]

I''m new to these forume, and to my wonderful suprise, on the first thread I check, there are folks talking about Maine!!

We just moved to midcoast Maine from Taos New Mexico. We LOVE it here!! We arrived in the spring so have not yet wintered here, but we were living at 9000 ft in NM and are originally from PA so, are feeling we won''t be too suprised!

Just wanted to say that some of our favorite spots where we are looking to begin our homestead in the area are in Union, Hope (our favorite!), and Appleton. These places still have semi affordable land (to us anyway for what we were used to). An example might be the 14 acres we saw that had phone but no utilities (all neighbors are solar/wind) for $55,000. Had a good road and the neighbors are all in on rd maintenance. Seemed LOVELY!! All the communities I mentioned are commutable to Camden and/or Rockland and would be only about 2 hrs or so to Portland (which seems to be a nice city, although we haven''t spent much time there). The farther you go from here, the less the land costs!

We are still figuring things out here, but one thing I also wanted to say, was that to us, coming from NM, the respect and love for the land that people have in this area is just wonderful! There are so many organic gardens (I''ve read the most in the country??), many people live off the land and the sea, and folks are just friendly here!! There are quite a few active land trusts in the area and many towns are working to limit growth.

Although with that have come other towns that seem to want everything to come their way as someone mentioned about VA. This is definately a challenge in so many areas of the country right now and some communities are on top of it and others aren''t. Seems to be a mix here, but with the recent voting, a few towns just passed ordinances to allow big boxes and other just limited building size to prevent them from coming. Camden is very strict and won''t even allow a Mickey Ds!!!! Rockland is the town with the Wally World and the Home Depot. Waldoborro just voted to allow big boxes too as did Thomaston...there will be a Lowes being built there any day now.


All in all though, from what we have found it is a great place (for us anyway) to begin our homesteading life. [:)]
ajortolani
#23 Posted : Sunday, September 03, 2006 9:16:39 PM
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Posts: 134,494
quote:
Originally posted by Emily Lah

Does anyone know about the central PA area? My husband as a job offer in Lewisburg and we are thinking about taking it since it would financially help us reach our goal, but we don''t know much about the area and community. We grew up in rural northwest Indiana (farm girl) then moved to Austin TX for the jobs after college. Four years later we are doing everything we can to leave the city and move back to the county. Growing up I never thought that I would miss the farm, but I was wrong.
Thanks!


Hi Emily, I''m in N.E.Pa & I believe Lewisburg is by Williamsport/Bloomsburg area, if so, it is a beautiful area & about 50 miles west of me....just off of the Pocono Mountains but still very hilly. I visit a dairy farm there often & it is a very rural/farm community with large towns such as Bloomsburg & Williamsport, everything else I''ve seen are pretty much the old 1-horse towns so to speak.
Redneckn
#24 Posted : Monday, September 04, 2006 3:10:57 AM
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Posts: 134,494
If I had the luxury of choosing where to put down some roots, it would not in no way, shape, or form be here in Louisiana. The climate here is terrible, the economy sucks, and the politics are dirty. The only really really good thing is that you can catch almost record numbers of bass and catfish year round. If you like that kind of thing. The reason I am here is because I was raised here and it was easier to just stay. Besides, all the places I''ve been to, the ones I really liked were out of the question due to concerns for work. Being a lawnmower mechanic, having a hellishly long growing season is great. That way I am not really ever "off". Even in the dead of winter, people are still using their mowers to mulch leaves and pick up pine straw.
I think when we get around half way thru the 30 year home loan, we may seriously look at moving to another part of the country. And that part will either be northern Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, or NorthCarolina. My dream is to live out my life in Montana. My reality is that there is basically nothing for me to do for a living there.
dkhoek2
#25 Posted : Monday, September 04, 2006 3:24:21 PM
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Posts: 134,494
quote:
Originally posted by cchapman84

I''m in northern VT. Great place for homesteading with the exception of the price of land. There are still some deals out there, but they''re few and far between. There was recently a parcel for sale with 71 acres on the Canadian border, no road access but an established right-of-way, mountainous type land for $37,000, which is unheard of around here. We''re going to look at a piece of land in the town next to the one we live in that''s 9+ acres for $35,000 with river frontage. Looks pretty rocky, but nice nonetheless. There was a parcel for sale a year or so ago, 15 acres on top of a mountain for $15,000, but it got scooped up before we even had a chance to look at it. The soil is good up here, plenty of rain but not too much (around 40" per year), cold snowy winters, but a decent growing season (especially if you use a cold frame or greenhouse--know of people who grow spinach through February in a greenhouse). Plus, if you make any sort of handcrafted product, you''d be surprised how much extra rich people from out of state will pay for things with the "made in Vermont" label on it!



9+ acres for $35k? Wow! It cost that much here (W. MI,1 hr N. of IN and W. Of Lake MI.)for a lot just big enought to put a house on. It does get cheaper the farther away you get from city life and the farther north you go. MIs U.P. is still rather reasonable so long as you are not on any water front. You just have to be pretty self reliant up there as jobs are not real plentiful. Athough right now, they aren''t too plentiful anywhere in MI. I think we still have the highest unemployment rate in the continental U.S.
kTd
#26 Posted : Monday, September 04, 2006 4:06:39 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Redneckn, I have a classmate who moved to MT, bought 20 acres and grows organic apples on 10 of the acres. He has had a wonderful life this past decade. Picks apples for a few months out of the year, enjoys life with his family the rest of the time. He wouldn''t trade it for anything.
davidmmurin
#27 Posted : Monday, September 04, 2006 5:56:07 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Live here in the Central Texas Plains 102 miles SW of Foat Wurt. House and land here some ten years or so ago 3 acres and 1200 feet sq. in a ghost town is pretty peaceful but not really when the weekenders come especially during bird season with ther bang!pop! pow. They have no respect for nature. Hot in the summer and hot in the winters sometimes 95 during Christmas but as they say just wait a day and it will change. One Christmas was outside grilling in some shorts and flips and before the brisket was done there came a Blue Tailed Northerner...needless to say I had to grab my Artic coat and finish up the cookin. There are alot of berries and grapes ,peaches and plums and some apples in this area,along with the peanuts and this is a big dairy industry and cheese manufacturing area. Nearest town Stephenville to the North and Hico (famous for Billy the Kid). Cheap place to live taxes not much but have schools not too far 9 miles now used to be next door but bused to town. Had a railroad at one time for cotton production but only thing that remains is an ole Mule Barn. They have found gold in the hills and also was famous for gangs like the hole in the wall gang,plenty of ,dillos,skunks,coons,doves,jacks,cottontails,mockingbirds,woodpeckers,hummingbirds,bats,and not to mention scorpions,and rattlers...haven''t seen the horned toad in awhile,red tailed spanish buzzards,deer out the back door,plenty of horse grazing going on now and rodeo arenas,Tarleton State College A&M 26 miles.. Beautiful stars at night and water is only 125 deep and pump with a wind mill.
USMC6119
#28 Posted : Wednesday, October 18, 2006 2:26:40 AM
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Unless you are a multi-millionaire I would suggest staying away from southern California. That is south of LA and east of the Pacific coast. There are many othe reasons such as the reliance on water from other sources, immigration issues (regardless of which view you choose), education quality issues (K-12), commuting problems, increasing property taxes at the cyclic rate, you name it.
hillsidedigger
#29 Posted : Wednesday, October 18, 2006 12:12:27 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Let me quote a customer of mine about a year ago and you''ll know why Western North Carolina (the original home of Mother Earth News) is not the place to relocate.

The customer, relocated from Florida and bought 10 acres for $50,000 in a 2500 acre development that had been acquired by the developer only 28 years ago for less than $500,000. The customer after one year of ownership sold 3 acres of his 10 for $65,000. Keep in mind, that property is 2.5 miles along steep gravel one lane roads from a paved highway, is 5 miles from a country store, is 10 miles from a small town with very limited services, 15 miles from a Lowe''s and Walmart and 35 miles from a fair sized town for shopping or employment.

Still, this customer stated that this small county, 40,000 people, would have more residents relocated here from Florida within 5 years than locals who live here now

and that ''Us locals would be better off for it!'' I don''t think so. But, in any case along with exploding land prices, the wait for services like real estate attorneys, surveyors, building contractors, electricians, plumbers, grading contractors, etc. can be many months.
skruzich
#30 Posted : Wednesday, October 18, 2006 1:49:46 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by hillsidedigger



and that ''Us locals would be better off for it!'' I don''t think so. But, in any case along with exploding land prices, the wait for services like real estate attorneys, surveyors, building contractors, electricians, plumbers, grading contractors, etc. can be many months.



Well gotta say, if the floridians are stupid enough to pay the prices that were charging for land up here, then by gawd, sell it to them. I saw a piece of realestate that is setting at a 75degree angle go for 44k a acre. Glad i got mine before the rush :D
But the halfbacks won''t be around long before they start (system edited)ing its too cold and back to florida they go.
hillsidedigger
#31 Posted : Wednesday, October 18, 2006 2:01:09 PM
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Posts: 134,494
I could say the same thing about NW South Carolina and North Georgia.

My father grew up on a 70 acre farm in Rabun County, GA right across the creek (Little Tennessee River headwater) from the Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School, from which the Foxfire books came), in fact he attended high school and junior college there about 75 years ago.

To say the least the Rabun County area is now overrun with development and prices are extreme. To some extent its an Atlanta suburb even though 115 miles or so out of downtown.

Excerpt from the Smoky Mountain News about Jackson County, NC which features such places as Wolf Creek and Panthertown Valley because this was the heart of the last really wild place in the Southern Mountains:

"the full-time residents of Jackson County and its neighboring counties will be looking at a grim picture whereas the future is concerned. Land along this bottom where I farm was selling not long ago for $300 to $500 an acre but is now selling for as much as $100,000 an acre. Flat bottom land is choice real estate here in the mountains, and the prices are only going to rise as out-of-state developers come in here looking for choice sites for their gated communities, retirement and second homes. Why, they’re selling property up in Tuckasegee from helicopters, with buyers not even setting foot on the ground! $300,000 for one-third acre lots."

http://www.smokymountainnews.com/issues/10_06/10_25_06/op_using_development.html
dolmen
#32 Posted : Saturday, October 28, 2006 9:33:33 AM
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Posts: 134,494
This has been a very useful thread to me as an outsider, I am searching for 10 - 20 acres with hard woods for timber, water front access (river or lake), views...you got the picture, right? It can have a small cabin, or mobile, or house, just so long as the price suits my pocket when the time comes and the taxes too!

I''ve had a look at Texas (too hot and humid)and the only other place i''ve been was San Fransisco and the prices are prohibitive! So now I''ve been given the info that I should be looking in a few other places, so that helps for our next trip over to the USA or Canada.

Keep those sugestions coming, thanks!

Besty Regards,

[:)]
cujobuster
#33 Posted : Tuesday, October 31, 2006 12:17:27 AM
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A nurse friend of mine, just purchased 15 acres of land outside of Linden Tennessee - asking price $25k - she paid $23,000 her mom bought 15 acres right close by - for $33k---Linden is in a valley and the tornadoes that are known in western TN don''t hit in that area - just a thought...
maisiedotes
#34 Posted : Friday, November 03, 2006 8:02:41 PM
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Wow- I had no idea there were so many mainers! I live in Dresden myself- our area has lots of farms and our land seems quite fertile. If only we could move our house to get more sun in the garden...
John Stiles
#35 Posted : Tuesday, November 07, 2006 2:15:13 AM
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Snakes or snow you decide. Other than that as I travel around the place I live, these Finger Lakes are beautiful. I''m sure there is beauty and affordablility in every state.
Next question: How are you going to make ends meet? A degree in higher education or your non -academic skills. This would have a lot of impact where in a particular region you might settle down.
My family has five generations in this township, I guess I ain''t leavin''. By the way this is more snow than snakes, we do have them crawl across the floor occasionally, as well as salemanders.
Upstate NY does have a wide range of cultures and is economically depressed enough to have reasonably priced places.
TriciaK
#36 Posted : Wednesday, December 27, 2006 5:08:04 AM
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I live on what used to be part of my great-grandparents homestead, handed down through 3 generations, in northern Indiana. But, the city has started moving in along with subdivisions. The rural road that once weaved in front of my house is now a throughway to a State Rd about a mile down from me. The peace & quite that once existed is now filled with boom boxes blaring from speeding cars all night. I can''t put out holiday decorations anymore without them getting stolen or smashed. I have yet to find a mailbox that can withstand the weekend drivebye batting practices. And, many in the subdivisions are complaining about the smell from the dairy farm down the road & the pig farm up the road. They''ve moved in and expect the farmers to clean up or move out. It''s very frustrating!
seekswondernwisdom
#37 Posted : Monday, January 08, 2007 2:06:58 AM
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If you do not mind the opinion of a has been, crusty, worn out trucker that has only missed the few upper New England states. What do you want? The West in my opinion is liveable hummidity wise. East of the Dakotas to the No or Oklahoma to the So ya hit a wall of humidity that is sweltering in the summer heat and bone penetrating in the winter cold. Mississippi in the So. should be a consideration if you like hospitable people. Missouri and environs is ripe for a megga quake. I felt at home in Nebraska, liked the feel also in Wisconsin-Minnesota; Minnesota has high unemployment a very hard to make it economy espically in some northern areas. Montana is neat and fast becoming unaffordable unless you can compete w movie stars, atheletes or the wealthy. Real estate prices are going out of site starting in San Diego, and LA moving east. Tucson-Phoenix in Arizona is growing out of site and price followed by Lost Wages and up into the So west corner of Utah my local town of ST. George made it in MEN as one of the 5 most desireable areas of the country although very pricy to buy n live w low earnings capabilities. Personally I do not gravitate towards lots of people;I like a rural approach better. Nevada is like 90 + federal lands. Utah, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Texas, Kansas and Oklahoma all have a good feel. The caldera at Yellowstone for quakes n such is a huge worry also. Oregon I cannot recommend espically for men for some (to remain) personal reasons. Washington is a fun state w a super high sales tax and is prone to quakes also.
All people and areas are easy to like unto mirrors ya kind of get back out the attutide ya put in.
Gods green earth
#38 Posted : Friday, June 13, 2008 3:14:53 PM
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Posts: 134,494

I was searching for that great place to live,and I realized after all the moving here and there Florida, Utah, Nevada, I have realized that it was in my own backyard. I was born and raised in Texas and know there is no place like home. A long time ago I realized how true the Wizard of Oz is in real life. When I became not so selfish and realized the world does not revolve around me, Texas is where I belong. The humidity is high, heat is unreal,storms are terrible, but it is home. I don't care where you go it's the same positive negative,ups and downs,ins and outs, etc.etc.etc..

There's no place like home,There's no place like home,There's no place like home. God put that little voice inside of you for a reason. Listen to it. It will tell you where to go. Unless GOD decides otherwise.

marty85911
#39 Posted : Thursday, July 03, 2008 4:43:43 PM
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Posts: 134,494

We like central (east) Arizona. 6000 ft in elevation and relatively cheap land. Many 40 acre parcels of juniper, cedar, pinon are to be had for around $1000 per acre. My wife and I found the town of Show Low in 2000 and ended up buying 20 acres in Snowflake just to the north. At the time we paid $15,000 and built a cabin to live in. Water is drawn from one of the largest underground aquifers in the world, the Coconino Aquifer 300 feet below us. There has been an upswing of people moving out here to escape the Phoenix/Tuscon heat (15-20 degrees lower), homesteaders looking for a way to simplify their lives. We love it. Lots of independent-minded folks here.

peaceandquiet
#40 Posted : Tuesday, October 07, 2008 6:55:01 PM
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Dar wrote:
Cujobuster,

I''m originally from "Nile/Friendship", NY... about 70 miles SE of Buffalo... Moved to Phoenix, AZ in ''62 (when I was 6 years old) and have been trying to get out ever since I was old enough to know better.

Hi Dar,
 
New member here.  I am investigating part of NY for a small homestead and came across Friendship on an on-line realtor site. 
 
Is it a nice area?  Views? High water table?  Low taxes?  These are all criteria  I am looking for.  Any info you care to share on the area would be appreciated.
 
Thanks!
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