Logged in as: Anonymous Search | Active Topics |

7 Pages <1234>»
Despair? Determination? Delight? — Let’s Discuss Options
Gina
#21 Posted : Thursday, May 29, 2008 2:38:41 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
This is an interesting topic to say the least. One thing to remember is that this world's economy wasn't built on just oil. It was built on CHEAP oil. There in lies a big part of the problem. There is still oil but production has leveled off. There is other oil yet to be tapped but its not cheap to get to or process. In speaking with a friend who was an oil geologist for a major company for 10 years, this is what I was told. Oil wells are under pressure. When that pressure diminishes to the point it isn't literally pushing the oil upward, the wells were often capped off. It was cheaper to move on than to try to pump the oil out. To do so frequently required flooding a well with saltwater and siphoning the oil off the top or pumping steam into the well to force more oil out of the surrounding rock. Both expensive endeavors. There is oil in Alaska and in the Gulf of Mexico but what is required to reach it is expensive. There are options such as the tar sands and oil shales that can be mined and processed. But this is dirty oil and has to go through additional refining. Again, an expensive process.  As you can see, it isn't so much the peak of the available oil but rather, the peak of the CHEAP oil that's causing much of the problem.  Of course, we have to consider the environmental consequences of continuing to burn fossil fuels. The vast majority of us hear conversations regularly that begin with "The weather has changed! It used to be..." Goodness, even the USDA had to change the maps of the different growing zones! Between the peak of cheap oil, the climate crisis and the economic crisis, its another Perfect Storm.  But, dwelling on the problems doesn't solve it. Albert Einstein said it best, "The world today has problems that cannot be solved by thinking the way we thought when we created them." So its time to step away from dependency on foreign energy sources. Its time to step away from the ideas of a global economy. Its time to step away from polluting our world and fouling our own nest.  "Charity begins at home" and "Think Globally, Act Locally" are wonderful mottoes to live by. As another poster said, we need to do for ourselves and quit waiting for someone else to fix it. If everyone did that, the problem WOULD be fixed.

Now, what are we doing? At the moment I'm living in an apartment. But while we look for a suitable piece of land, I'm collecting books and magazines (such as Mother Earth News) that I can learn how to do the things I need to do. I'm working on stocking our pantry so that we can live off it for at least a year if need be. I'm also stocking everyday supplies that we might need. I'm learning alternatives. Already we've stopped using chemical cleaners and are using cheap, natural, homemade alternatives. We are working on greening our laundry and hygiene needs. I'm learning how to preserve food myself through canning and drying as well as proper long-term storage for those foods. I can't garden yet but I'm setting up a worm composting bin so that I can generate worm compost for my mother's garden. We are learning ways to reduce our energy requirements and decreasing our commuting mileage as much as we can. We are also working on gathering supplies we'll need on our little homestead. Once there, we'll be using the Squarefoot gardening method to grow an abundance of fruits and vegetables. We'll put in a small orchard as well. We'll be raising chickens and meat rabbits and will look into goats and cows if the land will support them. We plan to raise our animals as naturally as possible because we don't think a few years of human experiences can stand up to the billions of years of experience Mother Nature has. Our gardens will all be organic as well. I'm already fairly well versed in natural medicines and emergency health care so we'll deal with as much of our medical needs at home. We've even looked into natural/green burials for when we have to deal with the death of a loved one.  We feel that the more our family can do for itself, the less of a burden we'll place on the system in general. No one can be an island and be 100% self-sufficient. But the more everyone does for themselves, the more sustainable the system will be.

Gina
HockeyFan
#22 Posted : Thursday, May 29, 2008 3:13:51 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

Few people are going to be able to become self sufficient within a year or two.  It takes a lot of money and a lot of know-how.  Most people who are self sufficient became so through years of effort and sacrifice.  So I believe it's going to be a long process.

The best that people can do right now, since most haven't been working on this until now (if now), is to start preparing to give up conveniences and luxuries.  A/C is something we did without before and didn't miss it.  We'll miss it now, but the truth is that if we lose the grid, we lose A/C.  I'd rather be able to give up A/C on my terms, not in crisis mode.  At least up your thermostat so that you're used to warmer conditions.
It is funny to me seeing people that say they can't be comfortable in the summer if the temperature is above 72.  They have to have the thermostat set low, and in a lot of cases, I'll see them set it at below 70.
Yet, in the winter, when the temperature is 68 or 70, they think they have to have the thermostat set up to 78 so that they're warm.
Why is it that 78 is the target in the winter, but in the summer it's 10 degrees lower?  I don't get that.

As far as being able to be self sufficient with food, growing a garden (as stated several times already) is the way to go.  However, in the city, I'm not sure you'll be able to adequately protect your garden.  You're going to be robbed by the people who have not prepared.  In some neighborhoods, they'll just kill your dogs and take the food (and damage the garden in the process)(whatever they don't take, they'll destroy).

My advise for anyone serious about being self sufficient if there's a serious crash, is to move to a rural area.  I doubt anyone in the city is going to be able to fair well unless they have a lot of money for resources (that they stock up on ahead of time) and have guns to protect what they have stored.

 


Earth Home Project:
www.freewebs.com/stocktonunderground

 

Lorraine Davidoff
#23 Posted : Friday, May 30, 2008 10:35:53 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I imagine I would be okay if prices go up dramatically.  I have always gardened (flowers, food, herbs) and can cook, make cheese, and some other self-sufficient chores.  I enjoy that type of thing, so wouldn't feel bad if it became more "valuable" to society as a whole.  I grew up hunting/fishing and raising chickens also, but live in the inner city right now.  2 years ago I bought a 12 acre field well out of town and off the main roads.  I have put in a pond and planted over 100 trees (including nut trees) and will plant fruit trees next.  I'm ready to add a small home, garden, and go off the grid with no mortgage.  What worries me is how many people ask me if I will feed them or take them in if things get bad.  They don't seem to be joking and it really isn't funny.  If they think things will be bad, why aren't they adjusting now?  At 54, I just don't see how I could take care of endless numbers of people as dead weight.  I could certainly set up a soup kitchen.  I have been advising dozens of  (willing) people on gardening and routinely give away easy edible perennials with advice as to placement.  I could not fend off the "robbers" alone.  I look forward to creating my retirement home in the country and leaving behind the city grind but do worry about lawless behavior; people in Dallas seem so callous toward each other that it is easy to imagine.

hcaspian
#24 Posted : Saturday, May 31, 2008 2:11:16 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I'd start downsizing immediately.  Which is what I am trying to do right now.  I am absolutely terrified of the future right now.

I already garden and can.  But that doesn't pay the taxes and utilities.  Livestock feed is already through the roof.  You can only grow so much grass and then there are the doughts to contend with.

Right now my health is good, but I'm going to be 59 in a few days.  Will my health let me continue to do the things I am doing 10 or 20 years from.  Probably not.

I try to remain confident that the future will sort itself out, but I'm not sure at this point it will.

Pythor Sehn
#25 Posted : Sunday, June 01, 2008 5:47:23 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I think an important omission in many of these types of discussion is family.  Because of our affluence, the family has been abandoned, where it was once a life-line.  Until now, we could afford to split our families apart and scatter all our relatives across the world.  For some, families provided nothing that couldn't easily be bought or replaced in some fashion.

I think people need to try to reconstitute their extended family networks and relocalize them.  When my mother was growing up, she knew everyone in her neighborhood.  Why?  Because she was related to practically everyone in the neighborhood.  Families can provide each other with a variety of valuable services.  I'm sure the site members here could make an extensive list of the basically free or easily bartered yet valuable services that can be provided within a local, extended family group.  For example, my sister would be struggling without family-provided daycare.  My wife and I would simply go under without it.  Home schooling from grandma-in-law is a nice perk, too.  Why does every person in the neighborhood need a tractor?  They don't, but it's a lot harder to develop trust among strangers than it is among family.  The old saying that blood is thicker than water is going to ring very loudly once again.  Sharing tools, knowledge, and equipment among an extended family will eliminate a huge amount of redundancy and associated increasing costs.  Not everyone needs to have goats, chickens, and plow mules if there are the types of strong bonds that can exist among family and permit greater sharing. 

A neighborhood composed of an extended family also presents a much better security situation, too.  Everyone knows everyone.  You know who belongs and who doesn't.  You instinctively watch out for each other.  In today's typical neighborhoods, people have no idea what is or isn't a suspicious activity because no one know's anyone else. 

Families are likely to be the future retirement plan for all but the rich.  My mother tells me that things like nursing and retirement homes were for the rich only in her day.  The poor took care of their own; they didn't send away their elders.  I don't believe most people will be able to retire financially, so I hope they have treated their children well.  The state won't have the resources to care for us.  We'll need to revive the idea that each generation in a family cares for the young and the old, because no one else will be able.

An additional point for planning for the future should be the idea of consolidating households.  Everyone has to have their "own" everything these days, creating huge amounts of consumerist waste.  However, most won't be able to afford that in the future.  For those who have cultivated and maintained good family relations, they'll have the benefit of being able to put several generations under one roof.  My extended family members have already been discussing this.  It's likely that the expense of maintaing isolated nuclear family homes is going to become prohibitive, causing the households to collapse.  It's going to be more of a hardship to get yourself across the country in the future, so moving closer to a group of good family members is at least a step in the right direction.

While peole tally up their material resources, we should be just as sure to count the number of family members standing behind us.  They could end up being much more important to our future survival. 

cgbpackrat
#26 Posted : Monday, June 02, 2008 4:47:31 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
I had the good fortune to be raised in an "income challanged family", I guess that ment times were hard and we were poor. I really never felt impoverished. My husband also came up in a similar family and we raised our kids the same way, no matter what our income was. Our grandparents told us about the depression and world war II. I learned to milk a cow when I was ten, churn butter when I was six, and helped in the garden and butchered chickens. We got married right in the middle of the oil embargo, inflation/recession ridden seventies. So we started out right, making do with what we had. Our kids grew up and moved out and until a year ago we took care of half our 7 grandkids a good bit of the time. Our nest is finally empty and we are both now employed and working towards retirement in 4 years.
Nothing in life is a sure thing, the economy goes up and down, jobs disappear and new ones are found, it does not rain for two months and it pours for two months. The human species arrived at the top of the planet population because we are the most adaptable, not because we had secure jobs, big houses, big cars and even bigger debts. If we are no longer able to adapt then we must as a species be de- evolving. It is not a question of if things will get bad, it is when and how bad. History does repeat itself and like the weather changes and there really is not a whole lot you can do about it. EXEPT USE YOUR BRAIN TO ADAPT!
Over the past three plus decades we have in varying degrees produced our own food. A couple of times very close to 100% self sufficient. We now have rabbits, chickens, turkeys, guineas, hogs, a goat, two horses and a fine mob of calico barn cats. Plus, we hunt and fish.
We have a quarter acre of garden that produces vegetables, fruit and since there are not so many in the house now, will produce grain for the house. With both of us working we are investing our excess income in: A homemade hybrid vehicle, a diesel tractor, equipment and grain storage bins, a barn and shop, solar panels and generator and a smaller more easy to maintain and heat house. We added a small window air condition a couple of years ago that cools one small room that we retreat to when it hits 100 degrees or more. We only heat this same room and the bath in the winter, the kitchen is heated from cooking in the winter. The new house will have features that can use multiple energy sources (we have heated and cooked exclusively with wood, at our age we really do not want to "have" to cut and split wood every week). Both of us have skills that can be marketed even in a crappy economy. You can always earn some money, to cover the things you can not do yourself or need money for. Three years ago my husband lost a good paying job when his employer decided to exit the business. All he could find was a part time job two days a week. We lived for a year on two hundred and twenty dollars a week. That really was when we realized we did not have to wait till we were ancient to retire. So we set five years to accomplish the needed work to set ourselves up and be ready to retire. Working two days a week had a lot going for it. We found we had time to get things done around the house, go fishing, can and put up food, wild harvest etc.
We also found out we did not need a lot of money to live well.
When things get tight you need to be able to meet your NEEDS. Food, shelter, etc. the basics. What you do not need is a big mortage, credit card bills, cell phone bills, phone bills, car payments, a ward robe of fashionable clothing, cable or satalite TV, air fair and vacations to tourist traps. You need tools, a good healthy fit body to use them and the knowledge to do for yourself.
I don't care how much organic food goes up, I grow mine. Animal poop, compost, ashes from discarded wood and thinnings, occasionally a little lime purchased. We are moving to open pollinated seed so we can produce our own each year. Seed as well as feed is getting expensive, that is why we bought the tractor and are buying equipment (all used of course), we have started growing our own feed.
We have diesel pickups, old and paid for. We are researching crops for veggie oil to run in them, and a press to press it. Even with the VW van converted to electric sometimes you need a truck. We do all this on 4 acres and a little rented land. We are saving and looking for a few more acres to buy near us so we do not have to rent land and can grow our feed organically.
We have lived this way in town, in rented houses, in rural areas it does not matter where you are. Read, learn, do and leave the stress behind. Do not wait till tomorrow to get prepared, start today. I have always had food stored up, gardening and producing your own makes that happen. We have always carried a low debt load. It lets us be flexable with our money. When I could I always had a little cash saved up. In the early years it was just a little.
All the debate on why the gas prices are high and if we are running out of oil. It is getting real hot in the south and I am more worried about global warming more than if the oil is running out.
For me and my husband living this way has never really been a hardship, we came up livng this way, all these years high income, low income, bad economy, good economy we pretty much well kept the same lifestyle and values. Food, shelter, family, friends, community these are what have always been first with us and always will be. When I was younger I dreamed of one day owning a brand new car. I never have and I never will, as I matured I realized I already had everything I needed and wanted and if I happened to find something I wanted  I could go find a book and learn how to make it myself.
Many people live and grew up in a consumer lifestyle, some came up doing for themselves and left that for a "better?" lifestyle. Those that have never lived it will find it difficult to achieve, it requires a mindset that is rooted in the culture you grew up in. If you are going to do it you have got to change that mindset first then go after the knowledge and skills and start doing it.



HockeyFan
#27 Posted : Monday, June 02, 2008 1:30:21 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

It's obvious that there are varying degrees of this.  For some of us, we feel the need to be prepped to the hilt in case we have to be fully self sufficient.  Others just want to save a few bucks.  So there's different amounts of "being prepared".  I think the main thing is to at least make the attempt.  Do what you can, and when you achieve one level of preparedness, go for another.

Some people are going to be limited (by funds, knowhow and/or time) on what they can prepare for.  For instance, there's a limit to how self sufficient you can be while living in the city, due to silly ordinances such as not being allowed to keep fowl, or not being allowed to have roosters (yet you can have low stereos, loud kids and loud dogs)(just not productive livestock).

Without birds, you have a tougher time maintaining control of mosquitos (other than using poisons).  It's harder to till and fertilize a garden (without chemicals).

Cities have ordinances against livestock, so you can't keep a hog for garbage disposal.  You can't keep livestock for meat.

With limited backyard space, it's hard to keep a garden sufficient to supply a family with food.  Plus, a lot of ordinances wont allow a good sized garden (unless you can control weeds adequately on property lines).

However, there is stocking up that can be done in the city; although this requires funds.

I'm thankful that I live in the country, and that we have a good sized garden (in fact, more than one).  We don't yet have livestock, as I haven't had time (or funds) for fencing yet. 

I am building a new house (an earth home) and am hoping that when done, it will require less heating and cooling, so this will be a level of self sufficiency.  I don't see finishing the house for another year or two (funds currently limit us), but after that, I'll fence the place and we'll add a small amount of livestock (to start with).

I'm hopeful that those in the city can find more inventive ways to approach self sufficiency, and more confident of those of us living in a rural setting.  I'm glad this thread exists, and hope that if there are those out there with questions, that they try to get them answers so that more will be able to achieve or at least approach self sufficiency.


Earth Home Project:
www.freewebs.com/stocktonunderground

 

Julie Hale
#28 Posted : Monday, June 02, 2008 5:58:02 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

   Their is nothing different today that wasn't the same as yesterday. Forcasting the future is like praying for rain. Most of us prepare for the unknown, even though we don't know what the future will bring. Our abilities to make changes when needed is what has kept the human race a viable entity of life.  Life today is getting more complexed, this is assured by the fact of us wanting more materialistic comforts. My wife is a teacher who teaches 2nd grade. I am a retired engineer. We have down-sized and simplified are life styles after years of having most anything we wanted.  We have also been avid readers of Mother Earth News since I was in my early to late 20s. I am 53 now, my wife is 47. What we have been able to learn and teach has been to show through example. Honesty, truthfulness, lovingkindness, creating a garden to sustain us and grow spiritually with.  I honestly do not believe in a doomsday scenerio for the future. My Grandfather who was born in the early 1900s, lived through the great depression, and watched as the world changed around him. His success in life was his, as he would say,my mantra, "Use it up, wear it out, make do, or do without".  As for roving bands of vigilanties, I'll turn them into farmers and teach them buddhism, after I feed them.

 

 

ccm989
#29 Posted : Monday, June 02, 2008 10:45:32 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

What a frightening concept -- 10x the price of everything in 5 years with no salary raise in sight?  That would probably result in a social meltdown on the scale never seen before in the U.S.  I think what we need to do is PREVENT this from happening, not prepare for it.  Preparing for it implies that it will happen and we can do nothing to stop it.  I will not lay down and let this happen.  I have young children and I think they deserve a better future with organic food, clean, renewable energy and peace world wide.  Guess that's why I'm a subscriber to Mother Earth News!

Here are three suggestions -- eat less.  I know that sounds somewhat silly but after a recent trip to a local Wal-Mart all I can say is GROSS.  Morbid obsesity is becoming commonplace.  The worst thing you can do to yourself is eat, eat, eat.  Everyone should be slender.  It means less wear and tear on your joints, less heart stress and you can avoid rampaging diabetes if you loss weight now.  Self-control is very hard especially with so many goodies, saturated in sweet corn by-products, but thin means more energy and substantially better health.  Also quit smoking.  It smells vile and people fall asleep smoking and burn the house down.

Encourage World-Wide use of birth control.  I know this is controversial but the US, Europe, Canada and Japan have all achieved zero population growth which has led to a better standard of living for those populations in general.  Less poor people means less starvation, less disease, less building shacks in low lying areas, etc.  Of course, politics control whether women have access to birth control or not.  But it seems cruel for a woman to produce 18 children if she can't even afford to feed herself.  Politics and religious views need to change and accept that this is a small world and a smaller world wide population means more resources in general.

Most importantly of all -- VOTE!  Tuesday, November 4, 2008 is right around the corner.  This is our chance to pick a president who is aware of the effects of GLOBAL WARMING and willing to invest in a new Manhattan Project to develop clean, cheap, renewal energy, work toward a better future and who will end the unnecessary War in Iraq.  Everyone, of course, should do all they can individually to raise organic food, reduce their carbon footprint, use mass transit, etc. but we need leadership that will set the standards in helping America reach a brighter, cleaner, better future. 

I am not just praying for a better tomorrow, I am working for it.  Everyday.  I hope you all will too.  I don't want my kids or any one else's spending their future eeking out a sub-poverty existence in fear of roving gangs with guns who steal food, etc

Gods green earth
#30 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 2:31:38 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Gods green earth
#31 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 2:47:09 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Hello everyone! I posted a reply but I do not see it. Maybe I did something wrong or I was timed out. Just checking.
Gods green earth
#32 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 3:02:59 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

We have ten acres and a travel trailer on it. We are working on our well. We do have electricity.I built a composting toilet and a solar shower that work very well. We are in the process of selling our house and when we do we will move out there and build a small cabin. We will grow vegggies and fruit and preserve and cann them. We are going to raise chickens, rabbits, and a couple of goats to start. We will slowly become as green as we can as time and money allow.

The first step is to get out of debt and we have become 85 percent towards that. We have tons of trees so we won't run out of wood in this lifetime. Time to start living our dreams and stop working for someone who is living theirs.

The gang thing does not bother us. If you are hungry come and eat, but if you try to steal form us, I saw a sign on a gate that I thought was appropriate- No trespassing survivors will be prosecuted!

birgitNben
#33 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 3:29:20 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
We have 5 acres, and are in the serious planning phase to convert it to something much more useful than grass.  The first stage of the garden is in progress, to be expanded each year.  The orchard location has been selected.  We're not as far along as I would like, but at least we're moving in the right direction.  We have a hybrid car, and want a windmill and solar panels.

I live in a "University Town" and recently went to a fascinating lecture on campus by Steven Koonin, the chief scientiest at BP.  This guy is really really smart, previously the Provost at Caltech.  He said the world has 41 years of proven oil reserves left (AT CURRENT CONSUMPTION RATES).  There is a lot more coal and natural gas, but those are bad in terms of greenhouse gases.  The topic of the talk was "Can we have it all .. energy security and environmental sustainability?" ... his answer was basically no, that we won't be able to get our act together.  He said it's not a technical problem, it's a social and political problem.  There is no political/social will to deal with expensive long-term issues.  Social Security, Medicare, Infrastructure ... you name it, if it's expensive and can be postponed, we'll put it off.  It was a pretty depressing talk ... but I think he's probably right.  We'll fall back into cheap coal and natural gas, or "rape" the country to get to the oil shale and tar sands ... and toast the environment while we're at it.

See a version of the talk here (high speed internet needed):  http://clients.mediaondemand.net/bp/#

Why doesn't anybody worry about water?  Ethanol, oil shale, tar sands ... these all use vast quantities of water ... we CAN live without oil, we can't live without water.  I saw a statistic the other day that in order to grow all the crops we would need to feed the world population in 20 years, we will need 19% more water than we have (not including salt water).  We need to wake up about water usage.  Home gardens won't do much good if you can't get sufficient water.




meglet44
#34 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 5:26:28 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
HockeyFan
#35 Posted : Tuesday, June 03, 2008 6:12:51 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

The issue of water was mentioned.  It would be prudent to have some kind of means of collecting and storing rain water, and then being able to use it.  We currently have a few barrels, but hope that we will eentually collect more water from roofs and pipe it to a cistern or two.  From there, we hope to be able to pump from the cisterns to water the gardens, or possible water the pasture.

Another measure we have taken, which I realize not everyone can afford, is that instead of a standard septic tank, we put in a water treatment system, an aerobic septic system, so that after it does it's purification of waste water, the water is then sent out through a sprinkler system to our pasture.  This frees us from using water from our well.  We're essentially reusing water that we've used already, so it's a more efficient use of an increasing more valuable resource.

Water will definitely be an issue in coming years.  Search the CIA website and there are research papers on water resources.  Specifically, there are papers that predict drought in different parts of the world.  The CIA tracks this because of potential wars and other conflicts worldwide, as well as water issues specific to the United States.  Most people don't realize that the way they currently use water, they will not be able to continue doing in the next decade.  So a very good prep is to be able to use water more efficiently now, before its forced on you (due to government regulation, forced rationing, and/or other shortages).

 


Earth Home Project:
www.freewebs.com/stocktonunderground

 

Tinker
#36 Posted : Wednesday, June 04, 2008 11:28:42 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I think we are 75% prepared.  Our best friend throughout our married lives has been & is a budget, the enjoyment of watching it work, it's security and being absolutely rewarded by it.  Totally debt free.

5 acres of land, 1 acre in water, heavily stocked with fish.  Drilled 200' well and on rural water.  2500 sq ft garden every year.  Water filter in prep. area.  Large pantry & freezers. Fish are fed by buglights every night, and with oatmeal once/day.   No major concerns regarding water or food.

Planted 750+ evergreen trees many years ago for wind, noise and privacy protection around property border and northwest of buildings, mature now and could be (reluctantly) used for wood burning (fireplace) in an emergency. Keep a nursery of small trees and replace any that die out quickly.  Trees when cultivated grow fast.  Have used wood pellet heat for many years, provides 95% of home heat requirements.  Keep several years ahead in storage, rotate and add each year. 

Have generator, sine wave inverter, grid charged battery system to power heat related items & basic necessities if the grid goes down.  Installed a few small solar systems to (1) each keep a couple of golf cart batteries charged & (2) power outside security yard lights.  Feel it is better to use several small solar systems rather than one big one as I can cycle the batteries into the home inverter system while the other batteries take their turn at being recharged by solar.  Plus as the pole mounted solar systems are scattered around, it is less likely wind or theft damage would occur to all of them.  The generator runs daytime major loads, while the inverter will take care of the basics during the night.  No major concerns over heat or short term grid power.

Retired in our 50's. We work on our place heavily, anything goes wrong, we fix it asap. Store gas & diesel for vehicles, generators & equipment.  Most all maintenance and repairs are tackled, most we fix, some we don't and require outside help.  We currently have some moderate concerns about fuel costs. 

No animals other than a marvelous GSD who we pay very well to keep us company and alert us to outside intervention. 

Our blueberries, strawberries, gooseberries, pear tree are mature and produce well.  We are growing elderberries and have learned how to tinture and use some herbs puchased online.  

For whatever reason, we absolutely do not think it is foolish to become self-reliant.  Part of a healthy preparation system is to have guns and ammo. for you & your's protection.  If we should have to call for 911 help, the first thing that will happen is we wait, wait & wait some more.  We are both trained and prepared, no major concerns. 

We are very determined, we are not doomed.  Think folks, get healthy, learn things.  Put together a budget, use it.  It's not about how much money you make, it's about how much you spend.  Forget about keeping up with whoever. If you are convinced by the media that "big oil" is going to get richer, then stop in at your local Edward Jones investment firm, buy some "big oil" mutual funds. (not affilitated with them only as a customer) and try to turn that "bad news" into something positive for yourself.      

 

Lorraine Davidoff
#37 Posted : Wednesday, June 04, 2008 11:31:51 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
HockeyFan
#38 Posted : Thursday, June 05, 2008 8:16:48 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494

I would also suggest investing in huge industrial sized water purification systems.  With less and less water available, large cities in coastal areas will need this equipment to get their drinking water, because fresh water sources aren't going to be adequate to supply them.  This is when this equipment is going to sell like hotcakes.

 


Earth Home Project:
www.freewebs.com/stocktonunderground

 

Gods green earth
#39 Posted : Friday, June 06, 2008 6:20:03 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Yeah. We are going to put up a cistern just in case. Never know when water will be needed.
LindaC
#40 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2008 5:58:06 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
I've been involved and learning a lot from a relocalization group over the past three years, and trying to prepare as an individual for the triple whammy - peak oil, global warming and economic upheaval. I've put in PV solar, have driven a Prius since 2001, added insulation, installed new doors, put low-e film on my windows, replaced my lawn with vegetable beds, planted fruit trees, replaced my old water heater with tankless, etc. etc. etc. I had the luxury of doing all this thanks to my very frugal parents, but what on earth will happen to the millions who don't have resources to buy solar or work from home or don't have any land of their own? I'm very scared for them and, by extension, for all of us. On the other hand, we have a lot of unused brain capacity; time to put it to work and come up with smarter, cheaper, inventive ways to provide the basics for all. I live in Boulder, CO which has (maybe) the first municipal tax in the country to support city-wide efforts to lower our carbon footpriint. Our governor is committed to supporting alternative energy. And, once we have someone who is capable of leadership in the White House and Congress, I think we can make some leaps that seem impossible right now. As for looters - I can't say the possibility hasn't occurred to me, but I'd much rather focus on a vision of community, vegetable gardens stretching from yard to yard to yard, collective labor, a neighborhood solar or wind power grid, shared fuel-efficient cars, shared tools and skills. We are at the edge of such huge possibilities, both positive and negative. This is when we demonstrate our true character.
Users browsing this topic
Anonymous
7 Pages <1234>»
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.





Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.