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homegrown beef info? Options
DanR
#1 Posted : Saturday, January 24, 2004 3:51:56 PM
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Organic:

If you do this, do not let the cow become a pet! You plan to eat it, so keep it at a distance from the family. Call local packing plants to see what they charge and check the local agi department for cattle sale locations. The last time I check, feeder calves went for less than $100. It might be better if you attempt to find a seller of a fullgrown cow to buy. But be smart, buy only in the afternoon after the cow has had time to stand around all day. That way you will not be paying for feed and water. Some sellers will attempt this trick on you to jack up the cost, as you pay by the pound. And remember, a pound of water weighs just as much as a pound of meet. Also, check into what you can get for the hide and the blood. Both will belong to you and they do have value. If nothing else, use the blood as a fertilizer for your garden.
organicpanic
#2 Posted : Saturday, January 24, 2004 6:42:22 PM
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well, it will be living at her house, so I don''t have to worry about getting too attached to it or anything... she said she''s willing to do all the work, etc..., I just have to pay for my cow, 1/2 the feed, and my own butchering and processing. I never even have to see the thing if I don''t want to. She just wants to have 2 cows so they''ll thrive, but doesn''t want 2 cows worth of beef all at once.

How would I go about using the blood for fertilizer? I have a large garden, but the only way I''ve ever heard of using blood was as bloodmeal. Could I just pour the fresh stuff on there? I''ve never added anything but compost and some peat moss (first season). It''s all organic, but I wouldn''t have a problem with blood. Part of the reason we want to do the cow project is so we can raise it organically.
skruzich
#3 Posted : Saturday, January 24, 2004 11:16:33 PM
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Organic, I don''t know where that idea one needs 2 cows to raise a beef. I have raised beef steers before just one at a time. It is however better to get a feeder calf and raise it on milk for 6 months and sweetfeed and milk for the next six months and then slaughter.
steve
paratrooper
#4 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2004 2:01:57 AM
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I will tell you one thing I found out years ago . Raw beef blood will draw flies from 5 counties around . I hauled a tanker once a week for Iowa Beef Processors collecting the blood from their (and other) slaughter plants . The flies were so thick that they would fill my tractor if I didn''t close the window while the trailer was filling up . One new guy got to the South Dakota scales just north of Sioux City IA and was told he was overweight . Without knowing what he was going to do the scalemaster watched him get out of the truck and walk to the middle of the trailer . Before he realized what was happening the guy had gotten on top of the trailer , opened the loading hatch, jumped down and opened up the unloading valve . Several hundred gallons poured out and filled up the scale well .After that his weight was legal but he was in deep doo doo . There were thousands and thousands of flies all around that scale house for the entire summer .
DanR
#5 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2004 3:20:35 PM
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I would add it to your compost pile, unless you could swap it for blood meal. If you have some way to till your garden, you could till it in as soon as you get it, usually in the fall. That way you woul have it well broken down in the soil before you plant in the spring. Of course, this assumes you will be butchering in the fall.
organicpanic
#6 Posted : Sunday, January 25, 2004 3:30:06 PM
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Steve, I''ve heard the thing about raising at least 2 together before too. Something about competing for food and therefore gaining more weight faster, I think.

Tom, thanks for the warning about the flies! I''m sure that would have made me popular with the neighbors in my development!
ginger71
#7 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2004 3:08:09 PM
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Be sure to call them "Delicious" and "Yummy"!!;)
skruzich
#8 Posted : Monday, January 26, 2004 7:21:42 PM
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Or hamburger and ground round, tbone and sirloin.
mikeg
#9 Posted : Wednesday, January 28, 2004 6:14:01 PM
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They are herd animals and are more relaxed and calm when with others of the same species. A calm relaxed steer makes for tender tasty meat.
Go to some one that raises cattle to by your feeders, your chances of getting good ones without problems are higher than in a sale barn.
skruzich
#10 Posted : Wednesday, January 28, 2004 6:17:14 PM
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Look at dairys, they usually sell off the bull calfs.
organicpanic
#11 Posted : Wednesday, January 28, 2004 6:17:14 PM
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A friend of mine has approached me with a proposition:

She wants to raise and butcher a cow, and she's heard that you should keep at least two together, so she wants to know whether I want one too. My question is, how much would I likely have to pay for buying a calf, feed, vet costs??, and butchering and processing? She's never done it before, so she doesn't have a whole lot more information than I do. She has 11 acres, 3 horses, 2 goats, and various dogs and cats already, and grows her own hay, so it's not like she doesn't know anything about keeping animals, but she's never done cows before.

Anyone with any experience out there that can give me some info?[?]
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