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Beekeeping basics? Options
skruzich
#21 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 2:40:25 PM
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Hey all ya gotta do is take benedryl and then bee venom :P hehe. I buy epinephrine all the time over the net to give my pets when they have a reaction to parvo vaccine. I guess it will handle bee stings too.
steve
nicholasn2
#22 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 2:33:07 AM
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i had a colony of bees camping in a cavity of cement block. took a piece of an old sack, soaked it with oil and lit it. periodically faned it to keep the smoke alive.held it close to the bees. they all protected their little home by keeping close. none came to sting me. then i gently scraped the whole thing into a hive. with only five frames. slowly they moved onto the frames.abandoning their old combs.as the combs were emptied out, i discarded them put some more frames into the hive, untill the hive was full of frames where the bees were busy filling them. now this story ends on a sad note. had to leave the house for two weeks or so, ants moved in, emptied everything.
lytey
#23 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 1:47:34 PM
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You could also check your local community college, ours is offering a beginning beekeeping course (noncredit)for $40 or $50. Might help you get started. Good day Lyte
skruzich
#24 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 2:41:23 PM
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I have found a local beekeeper that is teaching me how to work with the bees, for free. Better to get it for free if at all possible ;)
Steve
DanR
#25 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 2:42:40 PM
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Sheila:

A new queen is shipped after being mated to Italian drones. She will not need to mate again until late in the season, if then. By replacing her each year you will insure that you keep a calm hive most, if not all, of the year. That would also help with the "State Bee Inspectors". Also, by adding more supers for the colony to fill, you will help prevent them from swarming. I recheck my sources and found that 100 pounds is not unreasonable for honey from one hive.
skruzich
#26 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 3:29:06 PM
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Most of the Beekeepers around here get around 50-75 pounds per super, and Most folks around here get at least 5 or 6 supers on one hive but it all depends on the weather. If you have too much rain, it washes the necter off the plants so they can''t get it to make honey with, if its too dry, there isn''t enough moisture to make honey with.
Swarming is going to happen, generally when the hive is overpopulated. Supers will help keep them from swarming sometimes. The best method to prevent swarming is to run 3 deeps for brood boxes, so the queen will just be plain outright busy laying eggs. ;)

New queens will not guarantee she hasn''t mated with AHB''s. They fly up to several miles away to mate with whatever drones are around that aren''t from her hive. So by requeening, she will probably go into a mating flight as soon as she is established in the hive.

Again this year though Honey is going to be expensive, in Georgia, they had a 20% loss of crop this year due to all the rain. Beekeepers pretty much kept most of the honey to feed bees through the winter this year. Next year there will be a major honey shortage.
steve
DanR
#27 Posted : Tuesday, December 09, 2003 1:39:05 PM
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Steve:

With a certified queen, she has been "hand" mated. She does not fly and all the drones are checked before mating. If you go with one of the established queen farms then you will get what you pay for. It is later in the year, when she needs to mate again, that the African drone will mate with her.
skruzich
#28 Posted : Wednesday, December 10, 2003 5:19:47 AM
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I understand that DanR, some are hand mated, most are not. I however have talked with alot of beekeepers and they all say that the queen still can mate at anytime in the season and she will fly off and mate.
The other thing too is that if you get a good queen you don''t want to kill her off every year, you want to keep one at least two years if at all possible before replacing her.
Dee Lusby out in arizona has the opinion that the African Bees are more of a urban legend, they are more agressive than the europeans, but not as bad as they make them out to be. She seems to think that it was another story cooked up to start another govt program to fund studies.
I think that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. If they are agressive, i am quite sure that they can be managed, you just have to use the protective equipment to handle them. Right now i don''t use any equipment other than a smoker to handle the europeans. Sometimes i get a sting or two.
steve
DanR
#29 Posted : Wednesday, December 10, 2003 2:43:12 PM
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Steve:

You are correct that the African bees can be controlled. Brazil is now one of the worlds biggest exporter of honey. However, some people who live in "urban" areas do "freak out" over any bees. If you can show that you are working to keep your hives with Italian queens, it will go a long way toward helping fight off any problems these "freaky" people may cause.
skruzich
#30 Posted : Wednesday, December 10, 2003 3:49:36 PM
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It didn''t help with all the media hype of KILLER bees a few years ago. That was a piece of pure trash they put out. Yes they can kill people so can any bee.
The benefits of AHB''s include a natural resistance to SHB, Verroa mites, tracheal mites, and foul brood. It looks like that the european bees are having so much trouble because they had their dna changed with all the breeding done on them.
Alot of other factors may play into that too.
We don''t have many feral bees left anymore due to pesticides and people killing off ferals moving into a area. That is not good at all!
DanR
#31 Posted : Thursday, December 11, 2003 1:38:42 PM
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That is why we are having problems with plant polination. My squash did not produce well this year, even with hand polination, because of it. I did not see very many bees around, even the hollys are not producing this year.
skruzich
#32 Posted : Thursday, December 11, 2003 3:15:54 PM
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We are going to be in real trouble if the bees die off. I am guessing that is one reason why my garden didn''t do anythign too.
Makes for a good argument for everyone to raise bees doesn''t it ;)
steve
ajortolani
#33 Posted : Sunday, December 21, 2003 8:28:58 PM
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[:(!] You should plant Lambs Ear, those darn bees were all over it! Bumble bees LOVED it & were actually camping out on it..they would sleep overnight on those flowers & would chase me away if I were too close[:(!]
Sheila
#34 Posted : Sunday, December 21, 2003 8:28:58 PM
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A hive of honeybees has taken up residence in our back yard. The Mr. has been keeping an eye on them (I'm deathly allergic to bee stings--carry an epinepherine syringe--so the bees are his thing).

What's the best way to remove honey?

Also, I remember reading something here about feeding them in winter. It's 70 degrees here today and the bees are busily visiting our lavender, sage, and citrus blossoms--so I'm assuming they don't need "help" from us?

Any other advice would be welcome. Thanks.
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