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waste oil heater(2) Options
Lowell Bernhardt
#1 Posted : Wednesday, October 22, 2003 10:30:53 PM
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Not to steal your thread, but where did you get your plans? If I could look at them maybe we can be confussed together.

Thanks,
LOST
macloudd
#2 Posted : Thursday, October 23, 2003 12:39:25 AM
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http://www.motherearthne...053-105-01&ID=3703&Num=6
You can check this site out.As far as the frying pan any stainless steel pan will do,they are pretty common at any flea market,junk store or even a department store.I can''t answer whether it has to be steel or even the why part.I would say you could use a gas fired water heater,just cut the flue pipe out and weld the hole up in the bottom.
dropkick
#3 Posted : Thursday, October 23, 2003 7:26:58 AM
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I could be mistaken, as it has been a while since I saw the plans, but to my recollection it wasn''t a steel pan it was a cast iron pan, and the reason for it was that it was going to bear the brunt of the heat from the burning and anything else would be apt to burn up. (Different plans from above link, don''t know if earlier or later edition)

Also try old house-trailers for electric water heaters, the only time I have seen a house-trailer that had a gas water heater was when it had been installed by the owner. Old propane tanks, or pressure tanks, would work also.
michaels
#4 Posted : Thursday, October 23, 2003 12:13:11 PM
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I have one of my assistants working on just this research. While Majere did build such a unit, a ten inch fry pan unit, it is small, built inside a forty pound lp tank, and we have too much used oil. We have outgrown it. I also have some of my people reresearching Majere''s toilet roll filtration system, with the hopes of learning enough to purifify, refortify, and recycle some of the oils.

There are three types of such waste oil burners, each with problems.

The Mother design, which uses a cast iron skillet filled with a unburnable carrier is the least effecient, but also does not require as much purity of fuel as the others. It is a true ''trasher''. But must be airtight to the outside and very carefully drafted. I dislike having to keep alchohol nearby to start it. I also dislike the cleaning aspects. It is a very dirty thing.

The jet type systems run the gamut of using second hand fuel injectors to a metal plated light bulb with a pin hole. Much more effecient, but if any coolant in the oil, etc, and the appature clogs. It also requires outside power sources. And air compression. Think of a scaled down crematorium. It need not be as airtight, in fact the burn chamber must be unsealed for it to be self cleaning.

The third, an unfinished design, used dichrome wire in an ''ocean wave'' oil bath. Self cleaning, very effecient, but requires massive power. It is really intended to be a means to dispose of old oil in a PC fashion.

There is also an uncomplete plan for a unit that would use old plastic soda bottles as fuel. It would be a very clean unit, the various gasses being completely burned. I admit my curiosity is up on that one, Majere left a lot of plastic.

I wish you luck.

Michael.
michaels
#5 Posted : Thursday, October 23, 2003 12:15:44 PM
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Almost forgot, Northern Tool Supply sells such units. You might find out some good data for your particular application that way.

Lowell Bernhardt
#6 Posted : Friday, October 24, 2003 9:39:46 PM
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After reviewing the plans. (thanks for the email) I have to be in agreement here with everyone else abou the frying pan. I too would have to go with a cast iron pan. As for the gas fired water heater, I woudl probably use one of those rather than an electric. As one of your flue holes are already cut out. And since the bottom has a hole already there then you could beef up that area with a heavier peice of steel as this area too will get alot of heat. The thing that I''m wondering about is the "crushed asbestos". Last I checked that stuff was pretty hard (oh yeah and dangerous too) to come by. Does anyone have any suggestions as to an asbestos substitute?

Best of luck,
LOST
dropkick
#7 Posted : Saturday, October 25, 2003 7:19:03 AM
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graphite? broken firebrick? ceramics?
michaels
#8 Posted : Saturday, October 25, 2003 10:42:40 PM
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There are modern, non asbestos, materials for the crushed asbestos. I think one of the names was ''pearlite''. Majere used a very porous refractory cement, but obviously not very effecient.

Michaels.
tavey
#9 Posted : Saturday, October 25, 2003 10:42:44 PM
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Things I have come to know,
A good Asbestos substitute would be Perlite from any garden shop, it''s volcanic sand thats been super heated and puffed up like popcorn, very temp. resistant and absorbent. I bought my cast iron skillets from Academy Sports, I thinks the pair was just under $13.00. Probably cheaper than the gasoline needed to garage sale up the appropriate sizes as well as quick and easy. (you can also order from them online) Enhancements to consider... I ordered from McMaster-Carr a drip valve with a sight glass made into it so that I can monitor and guesstimate fuel input. Also from M.C. I got a ceramic glass disc, which, with some creative mods to a pipe union, made a permanent flame viewing port that does not affect the draft. For an alternative to the water heater tank (full of rust & mineral deposits) find an "old tractor" junk yard and look for an old propane tank. We bought one of appprox. 45 gl. cap. for $10.00 2 wks. ago. It won''t be a heater but, if you teach the lady of the house to weld, you too might own a 12 ft. tall garden spider looking automatic game feeder to put in your pasture. (really).
Best to All,
Terry
macloudd
#10 Posted : Monday, October 27, 2003 11:42:03 AM
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Something else one might consider using in the pan would be the "rope" used to seal around a woodstove door.A propane tank would probably work ok,but you have to know how to work on one.Propane leaves a nasty black tarry residue in the bottom of the tank,and this stuff burns wickedly fast and hot when exposed to a flame.So be careful if you use a propane tank.Always drill and use a saw to make your initial cut and it wouldn''t hurt to keep the cutting area wet with a spray bottle of water.
tavey
#11 Posted : Wednesday, October 29, 2003 9:04:29 PM
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Thanks Doug, I forget sometimes to mention safety aspects. I am fortunate to have access to steam to flush out butane / propane tanks. Prior to steam I have just removed all valves, plugs, guages, and fill adapters. Then rinsed with water, allowed to dry, and set over a heat source (coals fom a fire or set on the trash burn barrel) to flash of any residue before cutting or welding. Fuel source: I have found a couple of small independant auto shops that will let me have their waste oil. I just finished a gadget to help load and clean the stuff. I scrounged a 3/4 H.P. elect. motor, a surplus hydraulic pump, two aluminum "spin on" filter heads, misc. fittings/hoses and asssembled a unit that pumps oil from their tanks and filters it (to 10 microns with water removal) into clean barrels in my truck. Free fuel makes me happy.
Best to all,
Terry
macloudd
#12 Posted : Thursday, October 30, 2003 12:16:16 PM
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Sounds like you got it goin on Terry,good luck and let us know how it works out for you.
majere
#13 Posted : Friday, October 31, 2003 7:34:05 PM
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To repeat Michael''s post, Northerntool has one in it''s catalog #1401.

Update, I called to ask about it. It is a ''splatter pan'' type, simular to Mother''s design, so can also take contaminated oil (coolant, transmission fluid and brake fluid). It is now on order. About $2000, cheaper than we could make it. Three nice things is that there is a push button starter sprayer, a piezo pushbutton igniter, and a remote thermostat. It will be modified on arrival, from pumped fuel to gravity fed, so we don''t have to mess with the little 15 gal tank and its pump below the unit, but can direct feed from the raised 55 gal drums. We will also be using an inline spin-on oil filter to screen particles. While it does require outside AC to run the starter and thermostat, it is very little, and these can be disabled or switched per the folks at customer service.

Take care,

Majere.
dcompdk
#14 Posted : Saturday, November 15, 2003 3:09:09 AM
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This is a little off the subject, but has anyone seen the plans for an oil filter made of pvc pipe and uses toilet paper for the filters. I am told it is in issue # 67. It is in the centerfold. Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.
michaels
#15 Posted : Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:14:24 PM
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dcompdk,

I have a dupe of that issue if you are interested. $5 which includes PM in the US.

Yes, it is in the centerfold. Trouble with that design is that it requires power. A simple gravity stand of 4" thinwall does nicely. We have several. We have a better aftermarket one though, it is a spin-off oil filter, but the filter comes apart, and you stuff a toilet paper roll in it. I don''t have a reference to where to buy. I will ask Majere.

Michael.
dcompdk
#16 Posted : Sunday, November 16, 2003 5:45:21 PM
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I am interested in your dupe of that issue. Can yougive me info on how to get it from you? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks,
David
loikaw
#17 Posted : Thursday, November 27, 2003 11:50:30 AM
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Discussion by folks who have built it. Some have modified it. Also a good board about tractors.
Hello everybody and Happy Thanksgiving!

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=oil&Number=236214&page=1&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&fpart=1
michaels
#18 Posted : Thursday, November 27, 2003 1:35:10 PM
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Dcompdk,

Sorry missed your reply. Just visit the website and go ''up'' the url. There is a FAQ file which lists our dupe issues.

I did ask about the take apart oil filters, Majere said they were removed from the market.

Oh interest to me is that the new enclave is using military surplus Yukon stoves to burn oil, and biodiesel, etc. I don''t know where Majere found them, but they seem to work very well. Knowing him, they had to be very cheap.

Michael.
dcompdk
#19 Posted : Friday, December 12, 2003 2:54:42 AM
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Thanks Micheal.
dcompdk
Redltdconvertibleguy
#20 Posted : Friday, December 12, 2003 2:54:42 AM
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I would like to build a waste oil heater to heat my garage. Im having trouble locating materials in the MEN's plans #1 is the steel frying pan. Does it have to be steel And why. #2 Is an electric water heater not real popular here in wyoming. Everything else is obtainable.
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