Logged in as: Anonymous Search | Active Topics |

WOOD LOTS Options
Ryan and Kathy
#1 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 12:47:46 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
I don''t know much being a new home owner and all and the fact that I don''t heat my home with wood yet, but my nieghbor does and figures I could heat my home (if I ever get a wood burning stove) for the rest of my life using only wind fall trees from our ten acre lot. Only four acres contain mature hardwoods.

Does anyone have a cheap wood burning stove for sale?
skruzich
#2 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 1:13:28 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Ohhh lets see, red maples grow very fast, Pine, poplar, all grow very fast. You could plant a couple acres and on a 10 year rotation, you would have all the wood you would ever need. The lumber industry grows pine and harvests in 10 years.
Woodburner
#3 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 1:28:26 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
The chimney sweep/wood stove installer who just installed mine said to not burn any evergreens (heavey creosote build-up and likely chimney fire). He HIGHLY recommended ash, with other hardwoods to follow (cherry, oak, walnut). These are slower growing in comparison to evergreens and other "less desirable" woods. I am burning maple at the moment and find it burns very quickly taking large amounts to feed the stove for the day.

Phil
dropkick
#4 Posted : Sunday, December 07, 2003 4:41:06 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
I live in a land of no native hardwoods (Montana).
I have been burning pine and fir as my major sources of firewood my entire life. I have never had a problem with built up creosote or chimney fires.

I do run a brush through my chimney every fall (if I find myself on the roof for something else I might do it 2 times in a year). I have never knocked anything I would consider a great amount of soot out of my chimney.

I don''t burn green or water logged wood, I normally cut and stack my wood at least 6 months prior to burning.

Most the chimney fires that I have witnessed have been from people who burn green wood, have never run a brush down their chimneys, and bank their fires too often.

Soot builds up inside the stack when the smoke cools to much before leaving the chimney. If you run fairly hot fires during the day and only bank your fires towards evening it will actually clean the soot out during the day.

When I read these "experts" who say not to use evergreen wood in a stove, I always think that they are from a hardwood state and have no real experience burning anything else.
Yes hardwoods burn cleaner, longer, and some even hotter, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with pine and fir.

A brand new mercedes might get you there in style but a used subaru will still get you there.
Hoop
#5 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 4:37:53 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Wood is considered a renewable resourse, because, unlike oil, which can only be used once, trees can be harvested from the same plat of land, over and over.

I have heard estimates ranging from 5 acres to 10 acres (forested) on what it takes to maintain a "perpetual" supply of firewood for heating your home. I never did believe the figure, given all the variables involved.
It depends on the woodlot, the species of the trees, the maturity of the forest, climate, size of house, level of insulation, etc.

In Northern Wisconsin, people heating with wood will likely go through 20+ face cords per heating season.

It is a mystery to me how the pines/conifers in the Western states burn far differently than the pines around here. The pines around here, properly dried, are pretty much completely burned in an hour or two.
skruzich
#6 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 5:07:52 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Anyone that burns cherry or walnut out to be drawn and quartered! ;) What a waste of beautiful wood to make all kinds of things from!
Anyway, Pine, Hemlock, white pine, fir all burn fine. Creosote only builds up from green or wet wood, which produces more smoke than it does heat. Plus anyone that doesn''t clean their chimney out once a year is asking for a fire. I have burned pine all my life too, never had a fire problem.
Pine burns quick and fast and produces little heat. But it works. The highest heat producing woods are pecan, oak, and Hawthorn with hawthorn being the hottest burning wood.
I also use coal at times when i need some real heat coming out and the weather is real nasty.


quote:
Originally posted by Woodburner

The chimney sweep/wood stove installer who just installed mine said to not burn any evergreens (heavey creosote build-up and likely chimney fire). He HIGHLY recommended ash, with other hardwoods to follow (cherry, oak, walnut). These are slower growing in comparison to evergreens and other "less desirable" woods. I am burning maple at the moment and find it burns very quickly taking large amounts to feed the stove for the day.

Phil

Ryan and Kathy
#7 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 7:11:47 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Hawthorn the hottest burning? Great, now I have another reason to chop down all these hawthorns (I had a bad run in with one, and had a 1/2" thorn surgicaly removed from my knee). I hate all this sumac too, but the birds love them both. Between the hawthorns, posin ivy, and wood ticks some of my city friends won''t even walk through my lot.
DanR
#8 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 2:07:28 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
A well managed woodlot will produce 1 cord of fire wood per acre per year. That is why you could have a supply of wood for ever. Also, as Mother published years ago, the hybred poplar will produce one cord per quarter acre if planted correctly. The first harvest would be at five years after planting and then every four years for five cuttings, as the tree grows back from the stump. It is all in how you handle your wood lot.
J.D. Clark
#9 Posted : Monday, December 08, 2003 7:38:01 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Properly managed, a hardwood grove should be able to provide one cord of firewood per acre per year or its equivalent in lumber. Softwood output is a little more because it grows faster. In Maine we generally figure softwoods can be harvested for pulpwood in 25 years and for lumber in 35-40. A ten-year-old spruce up here is a Christmas tree!

paratrooper
#10 Posted : Tuesday, December 09, 2003 5:04:37 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Don''t forget that there''s no free lunch . A tree that grows faster will also burn faster . The slower a tree grows the tighter the wood and therefore the slower it will burn . Soooooooo just because you got a cord of firewood does not mean you will get as many BTU''s as a cord of another type . Apples and oranges . You need to determine your needs . Know how many BTU''s each type of wood will supply and purchase/gather accordingly . I met a fella in Hungry Horse MT some years ago that went through 12 cords each winter on the average . 12 cords of hardwood is right at 36,000 pounds of wood . Softwood is less due to the lack of substance of softwood .No matter what you wanna do you GOTTA do the math .
dropkick
#11 Posted : Tuesday, December 09, 2003 5:55:27 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
12 cords a winter????
Did he have any glass in the windows of his house?
On a bad winter I use maybe 4 cords and I use wood as my main heat source.
I will admit I don''t cook with it, but I keep the house toasty.
You have to think 12 cords of wood would be a stacked pile 8'' x 16'' x 12''.
You would need one heck of a wood shed, and unless you bought it already cut, you would be spending a lot of your time getting it and preparing it.
I''m not doubting your word, but I think he was either pulling your leg, or telling you how much it felt like he had done after cutting, splitting, and hauling.
paratrooper
#12 Posted : Wednesday, December 10, 2003 4:34:40 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Dropkick , he also heated his business . He was located on the East side of the main road (highway 2) through town . We were on our way to Glacier Park and stopped in to buy some sil-voo-neers .He bought the place with money he made working on the Alaska pipeline . 12 sounded like a lot to me as well but when I looked around he had quite a bit of space to heat . Not to mention he might have been using a soft wood that would have required more than some other woods . If you are near there stop by and see if they still heat with wood and if it''s even the same guy .
skruzich
#13 Posted : Wednesday, December 10, 2003 3:17:44 PM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Dropkick, 12 cords of wood in the winter isn''t much for montanna!!! I used coal up there when I lived up that way. Remember it gets down to -60 degrees at night.

Ole, Those hawthorns are a gold mine for you if you take care of them. The dried berries sell for 9 - 10 dollars a pound over the internet. The leaves and flowers also sell for around 6 - 8 bucks a pound. I am planting hawthorns just to get the berries and leaves.
Steve
dropkick
#14 Posted : Thursday, December 11, 2003 6:48:29 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
Steve,
I live in Montana, was born here and been here for most of my life. But after doing some considering I may have been a bit conservative on the amount of wood people use. (Sometimes I think that I''m normal, and confuse what I do with what others do.)
I usually only worry about the temperature in the areas I mostly use while awake. So the living\dining rooms are toasty and the rest of the house slightly chilly. -I don''t let it get below freezing in the rest of the house, but it is in no way warm.
Also I normally don''t have a fire going all day - one in the morning - then banked - good fire when I come home (early evening till bed) - banked till morning.
I also sometimes use an electric heater in the bathroom in the morning, though not often.
And the amount of wood I use may be slightly more than I think, as I cut and haul in more wood during the winter and don''t really pay that much attention to my totals.
Also my stove while only about mid range in economical fuel use is still better than a lot of others I have seen.
However I still think 12 cord is a profligate use of wood.


P.S. quick trick for heating the house: air it out every day, as fresh air heats better than stale. I don''t really understand why this works, but while I was on gas heat the furnace came on less and I was warmer as long as I did this.
mfalecki
#15 Posted : Thursday, December 11, 2003 6:48:29 AM
Rank: Guest

Posts: 134,494
I don't understand when I read that wood is a renewable energy when we can burn it faster than it can be grown. Can anybody shed some light on this subject. Like how large of a woodlot is needed to heat a home and what kind of trees should be grown in it.
Users browsing this topic
Anonymous
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.





Subscribe Today - Pay Now & Save 66% Off the Cover Price

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Lighten the Strain on the Earth and Your Budget

MOTHER EARTH NEWS is the guide to living — as one reader stated — “with little money and abundant happiness.” Every issue is an invaluable guide to leading a more sustainable life, covering ideas from fighting rising energy costs and protecting the environment to avoiding unnecessary spending on processed food. You’ll find tips for slashing heating bills; growing fresh, natural produce at home; and more. MOTHER EARTH NEWS helps you cut costs without sacrificing modern luxuries.

At MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we are dedicated to conserving our planet’s natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. That’s why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.00 (USA only).

You may also use the Bill Me option and pay $17.00 for 6 issues.