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Fencepost problem (T-post in rocky ground) Options
johnhagen
#1 Posted : Saturday, November 15, 2003 12:05:47 PM
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Could you take a cement drill and mount a bracket like you could hold a 4x4 post.They have these at the lumber yard for decks.The bracket is held with 4 lag screws.
skruzich
#2 Posted : Saturday, November 15, 2003 2:55:57 PM
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Bellla, you could rent a rock drill, (ingersol Rand) for a week or so and run down through there and drill your holes. Puts a hole through rock about 2 1/2" in diameter, then you could drop a metal post and concrete them down.
Believe me its will be much easier to do that than to try other ways. Probably save you more time too.
macloudd
#3 Posted : Sunday, November 16, 2003 11:49:45 AM
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If you are having problems with "the 2 legged beer drinking critters with their trash and dirtbikes".You will not be able to construct one high or strong enough.Your best bet is to build some type of "rip gut" fence.You seldom have to dig for them,and they look nice.
Sheila
#4 Posted : Sunday, November 16, 2003 5:47:48 PM
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Doug, could you say more about that? We don''t have bedrock problems on our desert property, but we do have the 2 legged varmints....
mikeg
#5 Posted : Sunday, November 16, 2003 5:56:44 PM
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If you drill, drill just large enough for the posts. If the drilling becomes to much work do it in the middle of the long spans and set two braced posts there tied together and streach the wire between the spans tight and put in wire spacers between the strands.
macloudd
#6 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2003 1:24:09 PM
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A rip gut fence is a row of jagged tree limbs and rocks laced together so if someone would try to run through it,the fence would rip their guts out.Check this link out and you will have a pretty good idea of what I am talking about,it shows an old rip gut fence in one of the pix.
http://users.lvcm.com/trails/bmr.htm

Sheila
#7 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2003 5:58:05 PM
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Thanks, Doug. I understand now. I wonder how one could use that concept in the desert (not many limbs around)...
macloudd
#8 Posted : Tuesday, November 18, 2003 6:30:34 AM
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I would look at a scrap yard for old angle iron if I was "Dead" serious about it,but be careful.In my area,you are responsible for someone getting hurt on your property.Some jerky ACLU lawyer would love to take you to court if someone got hurt on a "Mad Max" ripgut type of fence.
EliezerSilver
#9 Posted : Wednesday, November 19, 2003 1:31:59 AM
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So long as the fence isn''t infringing on anyone''s civil rights, I don''t think the ACLU will be involved in a law suit. I agree that a fence will probably not keep anyone off your land, but it can be usefull in a tresspass action if you post warnings along it.
Bellla
#10 Posted : Wednesday, November 19, 2003 1:52:50 AM
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Thanks for the rock drill & cement input. For the size hole I want to drill would the rock drill be something you could pick up in a van or would you need to tow it on a trailer? Also, I''m assuming that you would need water to keep the bit cool - any idea how much would be needed? We have to haul in any water we use until we get a well put in (which at approx $10k won''t be for quite a while.)

Bellla

P.S. I''ll pass on the extreme fence ideas - the liability issues make my head spin just thinking of them. Where we are there is so much empty land that a simple fence will keep our lot "mostly" tresspasser free as most of the other lots are unfenced and uninhabited. Anyone that is not deterred by the fence would probably be looking for "freebies" they can haul off. We try not to leave anything up there that we would miss if it "grew legs". However we did attach no tresspassing signs to some fenceposts that we were able to set.
skruzich
#11 Posted : Wednesday, November 19, 2003 2:39:06 AM
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Oh heck now bellla, You will need the drill and the compressor that accompanies it. Probably need to get it delivered or something like that. Look for a company that does road work, blasting or something like that. They ahve the rock drills.
I don''t remember if we used water to cool the bit. I don''t think we did when I ran one. its only a small 3" bit.
steve
Countrygal
#12 Posted : Wednesday, November 19, 2003 2:32:44 PM
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Years ago we had the same problem. We rented a rock drill with a bit just a little smaller than the T-posts. We brought it home in a pickup but might fit in a van. No water involved. Drilled the holes then my husband just drove the T-posts with mall while standing on the tailgate. Didn''t need any concrete the posts were so tight.

Countrygal
Bellla
#13 Posted : Friday, November 21, 2003 6:24:09 AM
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I had tried looking on the internet for some idea of what a rock drill looked like and at first I only found huge rigs. I''ve now found some that look closer to the size we would need and am more encouraged. Thank-you CountryGal for the first hand info - glad to know it can be done!
crwmdpmr
#14 Posted : Friday, November 21, 2003 6:39:09 AM
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I don''t know if this would work for you
but here in the ozarks it''s pretty rocky also
and people take wire fencing and form a
cylinder about 2 feet in diameter. They
set it in place and fill it with loose
rocks and use this as a fence post.

Also consider laying out a bag or two
of quik-crete dry with post stuck into
it. They bag will conform to surface
irregularities and the next time it
rains it will set up. This base will
weigh about 70# per bag used.
Sheila
#15 Posted : Friday, November 21, 2003 6:01:02 PM
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Oooh, those wire cylinders filled with stones could work on our land. Thanks!!
Garden Lad
#16 Posted : Friday, November 21, 2003 6:28:12 PM
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If you go that route, Shela, dust each layer of stone with dry morter. They''ll lock together better soon as the first rain or high humidity hits. And make it harder to be intentionally knocked down.
Bellla
#17 Posted : Sunday, November 23, 2003 12:47:11 AM
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Those rock cages are called gabions and they look really neat. Some people in the area have used them, mostly for corner markers or a short fenceline in the front of their property. One guy linked his gabions with fence rails placed every 2 feet or so into the rocks. Some have fallen over on some properties but I don''t know if it was ice heave, imbalance, or vandalism.
Bellla
#18 Posted : Sunday, November 23, 2003 12:47:11 AM
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Hi All,

We are planning our projects for next year and one of them is quite a puzzler. We have 10 acres (currently uninhabited) at the 4,000 ft level of a mountain. Most of the property is rocky (mostly small to med sized rocks, some 30 pounds or larger). The bedrock is basalt. Where there is dirt it is loamy and approximately 3+ feet deep in some places. We were able to place some t-bar fence posts this year, but have great stretches (30-50 feet) where there is only a few inches of dirt and a whole lot of Basalt. We would like to fence to keep the "2 legged beer drinking" critters with their trash and dirtbikes off our land. We do not have any livestock, though I might want something to keep the grass down in the future. How can I set fenceposts in the rocky areas? Is there some kind of small DIY auger setup that would allow us to drill a hole in the rock and then set the post with cement? Would that be affordable & worth the effort? Are there other alternatives besides laying a rock wall? By the way, we get some pretty powerful winds so whatever we put in has to stand up to that. I appreciate any input.

Bellla
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