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metal building as house shell Options
Farside
#1 Posted : Sunday, January 05, 2003 2:30:30 PM
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That''s interesting because I have also had thoughts of using a metal building exterior. My idea was to use arched aircraft hangers (to get extra height) and have parking/storage under the arch. Kinda came to me after seeing the flooded homes near rivers.
Greenknight
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 05, 2003 6:18:20 PM
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I''m thinking kind of the same. However I was not thinking of having a basement. I''m thinking of using it for a bachelor''s bunglo, so the extra space might not be worth the cost. I do want to have the design so it can be added on later though. Personally, I like metal buildings however I don''t think others do. One suggestion, I have is put brick up the side. Then on the inside have a barrior between the living space and the metal wall.
gatorsally
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 08, 2003 9:06:45 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by bsimmons

Looking at various housing options for the DIY sort.
I keep coming back to the cost/simplicity of buying a pre-engineered steel building and erecting it over a full basement. Installing floor trusses and decking, then constructing interior walls so that there could be 12" of side wall insulation. Similar construction for interior ceiling.

Advantage, quick dry-in, structure is termite resistant, low cost shell (40x60x18 with 6'' overhang all around, 2" insulation all around is $16,400). This would seem to allow me to build on a pay as I go schedule as well as a place to stage components and dry lumber.

Disadvantage, looks like a metal building. Requires interior wood structure to create thermal break.

I would welcome your comments and suggestions or experiences. I know there are folks out there doing this but have only found one website with pictures and comments.
Thanks in advance

bsimmons: Here"s a web site for you.
heritagebuildings.com
phone 1-800-643-5555
They have house models along with all the other buildings,I"ve seen a picture of a model and it looks nice! Check it out.
Good Luck!
gatorsally
Lou
#4 Posted : Wednesday, January 08, 2003 10:11:24 PM
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I think it''s a great idea. I forget what those shelters England used during WWII but using that principal you could do it. Couldn''t the building be partially buried for efficiency AND asthetics? Building codes might play a big part in your decision, but I think the positives outweigh the negatives.

1. space...can''t beat it
2. Cost... see space...can''t beat it
3. Durability
4. Efficiency

Lou
au natural
#5 Posted : Thursday, January 09, 2003 2:38:45 AM
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bsimmons, We have a monastary nearby that is made out of metal buildings(leftovers from WWII). They are covered with stucco and look quite nice. They are in zone 4 and the winters get cold there. They must be insulated rather well because they live there year round.
beckyw
#6 Posted : Monday, January 13, 2003 7:50:40 PM
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A friend of mine in the mountains of central california is in a big metal garage building while her house is under construction. Yes, it''s wonderfully roomy but here''s something she discovered when the winter snows came. It sweats and she ends up with a thin ice sheet on the inside walls. Hers is not insulated in any way. She has moved out these last two months of construction (Dec/Jan), staying with friends. The metal building just didn''t work in winter although it was terrific this last summer/fall. Hope it works out better for you.
Greenknight
#7 Posted : Thursday, January 16, 2003 3:47:31 PM
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The insulation is probably her problem. I have heard that if you put stucco it''s fine.
simplehouseguy
#8 Posted : Friday, February 14, 2003 7:24:24 AM
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The problems with metal buildings in cold climates is that the framing is a wonderful conductor of the inside heat to the outside. Consequently, the cold interior surfaces then condense and sometimes freeze moisture. Wood is a naturally good insulator — about R-1/inch. Thus a metal building, even when the cavities are filled with insulation, must have about 1" of foam insulation as a cladding to equal the insulation value of a 6" wood framing member. The foam insulation, by the time it is installed will most likely offset any savings from the steel frame.

Houses with interior surfaces that remain at temperatures below the dew point will have moisture, mold and mildew problems. They ultimately become uninhabitable — not a bargain no matter what the construction cost.

Simple metal buildings, such as the space efficient quanset hut, are fine used as they were intended — as unheated utility and storage buildings.
pate20135
#9 Posted : Sunday, February 16, 2003 5:06:34 AM
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Shot celulose insulation seems to kill the condensation problem, judging from industrial buildings I have seen. In a few cases I have seen shot concrete over the shot celulose. In a few cases sprayed paint over the celulose. The most interesting one I saw was spray foam paint over the celulose, think of that automotive undercoating paint. *IF* I were to build such a structure, I would look into shot celulose.

Pate
laluce
#10 Posted : Monday, February 17, 2003 8:38:14 PM
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I am in the process of designing and budgeting for a modified quanset, with 4/5s of an arch on profile open to the south with post and beam strawbale walls on the other three sides. burmed into the back to the second floor, aproximate dimentions to the out side are 43x64 and a 25''radius. the problem so far is to insulate the second floor roof to r60. I spoke with the icynene people and they said that 5.5 inches is r20 but that it is 25% more efficant than r50 fiberglass. they atribute this to its natrale air and moster barier. so to use this I would still have to fir down from the metal to create the suports for the ceiling. the other option is to frame a flat ceiling but that to me defeats some of the asthetic reasons for using an arch... How to make finished interior space with super insulation. any input? I am happy to share any of my design solutions this far in the project. email at Revolucien2000@hotmail.com
RileyCoyote
#11 Posted : Thursday, April 17, 2003 6:41:53 PM
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We keep waivering between Metal vs Canvas (Like a Yurt but not). I am curious on how one puts stucco over a metal building. Since it is the Desert, insulation (alot of it) is going to be used whether it is wood frame, canvas, or metal.
I love the thought of Straw bale since I see straw sitting and rotting in pastures all over the Country, but it appears to be labor intensive and scare the bejeezes out of me since I am likely to be a one man operation.
wannabe_country_mama
#12 Posted : Sunday, May 04, 2003 6:40:06 PM
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Ya know, we are very close to deciding to build a "steel" home. We have been checking out Miracle Truss. It seems to be as long as you are a)well insulated and b) have good air exchange you won''t have any more trouble with condensation than any other home. And the price?! Can''t beat it...we are doing lots of southern exposure windows and some semi-transparent sunroofs. We are planning on having it run long like an earthhome to reduce the need to heat constantly by utilizing passive solar heat as much as possible. I agree with the person who said it will allow them to build as they go as opposed to taking on a huge mortgage...at least you have a (nearly) instant shelter to live in while you build! :)
StreetLegal
#13 Posted : Tuesday, May 06, 2003 3:35:03 PM
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Riley...stucco over a metal building? I suspect you''d want to sheath the metal with 1/2" plywood or OSB, otherwise you''d use a lot of stucco and it would be difficult to end up with a flat surface. Sheathing it would also give you either a dead-air space or you could insulate the spaces between the sheet metal ribs.

Make sure you have enough roof overhang to accomodate the extra 1 1/4" that stuccoing would add to the walls. You also need screws long enough to reach the metal structure under the sheetmetal...don''t rely on screws run into the sheet metal only to hold all the weight you are about to add. Depending on the sheet metal you use, you may also have to put some wood blocking in somewhere.

Could be going over the sheetmetal would be more trouble than it''s worth. Might be you could take the sheetmetal off as you go, then make your barn and other outbuildings out of the used sheetmetal.

At any rate, I admire you for studying all the aspects of the project...time spent planning is time well spent.
july
#14 Posted : Tuesday, May 13, 2003 6:15:49 PM
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what about sheet metal adn bales on the inside for insulation? Wouldn''t this work? I was thinking of a long arc in which the roof arcs all the way around and the south wall is wood/windows with the north wall being metal with bales on the inside for insulation.
Lou
#15 Posted : Thursday, May 15, 2003 5:09:16 AM
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What if... to offset the unappealing exterior, you landscaped to compensate? My home is very plain on the outside yet the landscaping makes it nice to look at. You don''t actually notice the house as much as the natural beauty of the trees and plants.

If you took the french quarter approach, you could make a gated courtyard around your entire home.

I think the idea is fantastic for affordable housing, and if the outsides appearance is the only drawback, it''s doable. The moisture problem would scare me. Humidity breeds germs.

Lou
Greenknight
#16 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2003 4:53:26 AM
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Here''s what i''m thinking of. First get some land, then build a garage? Why a garage? Because then i will have a place to store stuff and work. I''m thinking a steel master building for this. Then i build the shell of the buildling. I''m thinking of rammed earth. But first i need to get out of college, and buy a car, then i''m going to look into it. One thing though, about insulation, make it tight. Don''t just throw it in there, make sure the stuff doesn''t have holes in it for heat to escape.
dropkick
#17 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2003 11:12:01 AM
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Greenknight
I am probably misreading your post, but if you pack insulation in, it doesn''t work as well. The majority of insulations needs to be loose, and many have lower insulating value after a period of years because they have settled. It is the air spaces in between the layers, particles, strands, or etc. that actually provides the r value.
coastal hermit
#18 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 12:02:31 AM
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I have held off commenting because I have a bias. I am now in the kit home business. But I have to say ''something''. Firstly, few people live in the same place all their lives. Re-sale is a factor. What may seem like a bargain will cost more in the long run. Probably. I, too, looked at metal buildings for the same reasons - space and price. But, after investigating, it turned out that the cost would be more. Don''t forget - the shell is between 20 and 50% of the finsished house cost (depending on the medium chosen). Don''t be fooled by a ''cheap shell''. a guy made a fortune twenty five years ago telling peole they could have ''yachts'' made of ferro cement for 20% of what ''real yachts'' cost. He was right - for the ''hull'' part. Except that the rest of the package (engine, sails, mast, hardware, etc.) still had to be included so the gullible builder saved something on the hull and still had to shell out 80% more to finish. And the so-called yacht sails like the rock it is.
I came full-circle. The kit home package is the way to go. For a bazillion reasons. But the most compelling one today? Interest rates. They are so low that you can afford to buy now and pay later. In the 80''s it was the other way around - high interest rates ate up your equity payments. Today is a borrow-to-be-a-builder''s market. The other reason: 50% of relationships end up splitting. People change. The average tenant in our downtown area stays 9 months in an apratment before moving. MEN readers are more stable but just ask yourself - where was I living five years ago? How many times have I moved since I was 21? The reality is: most people will move. And then you will have to sell. And people don''t pay for metal buildings. But they will pay for a nice timberframe home or a nice log home. Go back and trust tradtional tastes. They have been proven by time.
Greenknight
#19 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 1:55:09 PM
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What i ment was to make sure there was a seal on the insulation, leaving holes it''s good.
Greenknight
#20 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 2:00:09 PM
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It''s true not everyone one is in the same place all their lives, and needs do change. That''s why i want to start off with a small house, then expand. Kits might be the way to go. I was thinking of a metal building for the garadage.
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