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Oilskin Options
macloudd
#1 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 2:09:43 PM
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The improvement is called plastic,(sorry had to say it)
:-) Hope you really find what you are looking for.
michaels
#2 Posted : Wednesday, October 15, 2003 1:26:11 AM
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Check at our online formulary books. I seem to remember something like that in there. I do know that Majere found a lot of canvas way back when, and treated it all. Cheaper than tarps. Most likely he found the formulation in one of those books.

Michael.
hunter63
#3 Posted : Wednesday, October 15, 2003 2:59:38 AM
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Are you looking to make "glass" for windows, or oilskin for tarps, clothing?
Old formula for tarps from "The Formula Book"
Mix 3 cups soybean oil with 1-1/2 cups turpentine.
Paint on and let dry.
Seems I remember a similer formula in one of Bradford Algier books but i cant find it right now.
For glass; rawhide rubbed with bear grease. Since bear grease is sorta hard to come by unless you shoot a bear, i would any kind of veg. oil would work.
Will let you know if i find the other formula and instructions.
New stuff works so much better, but it''s fun to try out the old ways. Good luck
dropkick
#4 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 10:07:34 AM
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Oilskins were originally made by applying oil to canvas (no wax) and then baking in a large kiln at low heat; the oil application was repeated a few times during the process. This makes a waterproof but flammable product.
They also used to recommend that you clean it with kerosene, as soap would ruin oilcloth.
It was superseded by rubber impregnated canvas.

The turpentine/oil recipe works. I used it years ago on tents.
I have also used paraffin: rub it on and then seal it in with an iron set on low heat. But both also make the fabric more flammable.

I would recommend that you go to Ace hardware and buy a product called Sealtech.
I have used it and it works well. Also a gallon only costs from $7 to $10 dollars, and if you only use it for cloth it will last for years. (an 8 to 10 oz bottle of waterproofer from sporting good store runs around $12 to $15)

P.S. If you are doing clothing or a tent I would also recommend that you get the water base water-repellant, (opposed to the oil base waterproofing) as you will be warmer and more comfortable with cloth that breathes.
--A tent has to breath, in cold weather you would actually be colder inside a tent that doesn''t breath than outside (because of trapped water vapor, from breath, snow, etc.)
Naturaliving
#5 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 11:49:47 AM
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Thank you everyone for your input. Maybe I''ll just buy an umbrella:-) I think that there were probably a number of old ways to do the job, depending on what was available at the time. It seems that some kind of oil or wax or a mixture of both was the basic requirements. I guess I''ll just have to do a little experimenting to see what gives the best results. I''d like to keep it as natural and as simple as possible but safe is also a consideration. I don''t want to be sitting around the campfire and become a human torch if a spark happens to jump out. I''m gonna experiment on an old hat I have first. I don''t think I''ll be doing anything much larger. Thanks again everyone.
Alan
Naturaliving
#6 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 8:18:15 PM
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Ok, here''s what I ended up doing. A fella on the Countryside forum called Homesteading Today suggested it to me. I took a chunk of beeswax and rubbed it on to the hat material and then melted the beeswax in with a clothes iron set on medium heat. It worked like a charm and my hat is now waterproofed. A bit stiffer than it was but in this case that''s a good thing. He says he also does clothes this way. It should be kept in mind that beeswax is flammable so if anyone is using this method use your own good judgement. In fact, many of the clothes sold in stores today are flammable but I don''t remember ever seeing any warning labels on them. To me, natural fibres are the way to go in all respects.
StreetLegal
#7 Posted : Saturday, October 18, 2003 4:37:16 PM
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I used to string up my canvas wall tent in the shop and spray it with Thompsons Water Seal. I used a hand-pumped garden sprayer. I always had to leave it hanging for a few days for the thing to dry and the smell to go away, but it always kept out the rain.

Most times we had a fire going inside or the tent flap open, so I couldn''t say about trapping moisture inside. I guess I''d rather deal with high humidity inside than a wet sleeping bag from a seam that dripped. :)
Garden Lad
#8 Posted : Saturday, October 25, 2003 6:41:40 PM
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Many living history hobbiests used to use the Thompson''s method.

However, two or three years ago they changed the forumula, and issued an advisory that it was _not_ recommended for use on canvas. So, unless you have a supply of the old stuff, Thompson''s is not longer the way to go.

Linseed oil and turpentine works. But the linseed oil makes the cloth very stiff. Neetsfoot oil might be a better bet.

Also keep in mind that _any_ waterproofing will significantly add to weight.

StreetLegal
#9 Posted : Sunday, October 26, 2003 5:03:27 AM
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"living history hobbiest"

I''ve been called a lot of things, but never that! :)

An old cowboy told me once to not use Neetsfoot oil on leather goods as it would deteriorate the stitching.
Garden Lad
#10 Posted : Sunday, October 26, 2003 2:10:02 PM
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I don''t know about that, as I use either bear oil or a combination of bear oil/beeswax on my leather goods.

So-called mink-oil will definately deteriorate stitching, and even the leather itself, over time.

Only time I waterproof canvas is for use as groundcloths and tarps. There''s no need to apply anything to a canvas tent, because canvas is natually water repellent. The fibers swell and seal, is what happens.

A really driving rain will penetrate. But it will penetrate even treated canvas, unless it''s actually been coated with something impermeable. Which then means it won''t breath.
dropkick
#11 Posted : Monday, October 27, 2003 7:58:11 AM
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Neetsfoot oil is what all the old cowboys in my family told me to use on leather. We use it on our saddles, at least one of which is well over 100 yrs. old and never had a problem.
Garden Lad
#12 Posted : Monday, October 27, 2003 11:57:25 AM
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That would have been my guess, dropkick. But I didn''t want to sound contentious over something I wasn''t sure of.

As the old Montana cowboy once said, "Unless you''re damn sure, better say ''I reckon.''"
Naturaliving
#13 Posted : Monday, October 27, 2003 11:57:25 AM
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Hello MEN'ers; I'm looking for information on the process of making oilskin. I know that originally linseed oil was used and then a mixture of linseed oil and wax but I think that there have been some improvements to this recipe and I can't find any info on the process at all. Anyone have some experience with oilskin?
Alan
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