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rusting stainless sink Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 4:08:38 AM
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hmmmmm
naval jelly will remove the rust, as far as the pitting, you won''t remove that, unless you sand or buff it out with a compound. If it is rusting, I doubt its stainless. unless it was from a pitting that ate through the surface.
steve
Tenngarden
#2 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 4:30:22 AM
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If stainless has rust, it''s sometimes because some OTHER iron was present, like maybe you placed a wet castiron skillet there, it left a ring, etc. Also wet cans can leave a ring. Just an idea.
VaughnHill
#3 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 4:55:48 AM
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Stainless steel is made from mixing nickle with steel. The nickle is what make it rust resistant the problem comes from cheap sinks that were made with as little nickle as possable.These "cheap" sinks will sometimes rust if a wet rag is left on them for a long time.
srj
#4 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 5:24:45 AM
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stainless ,,,chrominum/nickel/carbon nothing there to rust ,,i do wonder if the sink is a chrominum or nickle plateing like older car bumpers?? i''ve only seen true stainless rust once ,,was in a commerciel sink that some bonehead tried to weld with a ferrius welding rod my guess is a 7018 rust at every drag mark & tac,,but stainless will tarnish/oxidise but not rust unless contaminated by ferrites...if it''s flaking you can bet on plating
tc ray
Bruce Holman
#5 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 5:56:51 AM
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Yep, there are many grades of stainless steel.
For example, you should not use a kitchen-intended stainless steel in a photo darkroom. The photo chemicals will eat up anything below 316L grade stainless. 316L is also used for body-piercing jewelry, should you be so inclined (although I recommend against it since you are probably pretty enough already).

The probability is that your sink was the economy-grade, and yeah, they do rust. economy-grade is a good answer over the short haul. Use it until it leaks, then replace it with one that''s a bit better (and probably a bit more expensive [more expensive sinks also have sound-absorbent materials under them]).
Belfrybat
#6 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 2:33:05 PM
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Thank you for the replies. Knowing the kind of materials the previous owners used in this house, I am sure this sink is the cheapest possible. I have a tendency to leave the dishrag draped over the divider between the two sinks and that is where it is rusting. Also the well water here is high saline which is corrosive. I can''t afford to replace the sink, but need to stop the rusting. So - naval jelly to remove the rust, but any ideas of something I could coat the spots with to prevent additional rusting? Would polyurathane stick to the metal? Or any other ideas? And of course, I''ll not drape the dishrag there any longer! Thanks.
srj
#7 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 2:46:17 PM
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can coat with a heavy zinc oxide called "galv-spray "come''s in a spray can & maybe hard to find GRAINGERS would have it,,it wont match ,a dull grey but should buy ya some time best of luck
tc ray
skruzich
#8 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 3:05:24 PM
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check around for salvage sinks. I plan on that as soon as i get my house built. Find a company that goes in and salvages old houses.
steve
lytey
#9 Posted : Tuesday, October 14, 2003 3:53:57 PM
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In our area Habitat For Humanity sells building supplies donated, some are slightly used others miss ordered or overstocked. You can usualy find some good deals but have to keep checking because stock is never the same. Might be one in your area. Good luck, Lyte
boomer
#10 Posted : Wednesday, October 15, 2003 7:35:15 PM
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ReStores are operated by Habitat for Humanity affiliates all over the US and Canada. For the location nearest you see the Habitat website: http://www.habitat.org/env/restore.html. Best of luck!
andydufresne
#11 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 6:05:16 AM
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When you say "rusting" are you seeing and feeling rust or are you seeing a rusty stain?
Belfrybat
#12 Posted : Thursday, October 16, 2003 2:02:20 PM
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Thanks all for your suggestions. Replacing the sink is not an option right now--besides the price of the sink, I''m not skilled enough to do it myself and can''t afford to hire someone. I will try some of the ideas mentioned.

Andy -- it is actually rust, not a stain. It began as one small dot and is now 6, and they are slightly pitted. Obviously this was a very cheap sink. Since I''ve always had porcelain, I had no idea a so-called stainless sink could rust. It is not in the bowls, but on the divider between them.

Bruce Holman
#13 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 3:02:08 AM
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"...Replacing the sink is not an option right now--besides the price of the sink, I''m not skilled enough to do it myself..."

Well...I started to say, "Sure you are! Plumbing isn''t rocket science, and you can do it..."
But that implies that a relatively complex household job can be done intuitively. Actually, you can do it, but only after you have learned a few basic skills.

So...obtain a replacement sink--recycled sinks are available, often for the asking. I salvaged a complete kitchen counter with a sink, from a dumpster). Try a scrap metal yard, or contact a builder who does renovations, and explain why you''d like to have a free, or nearly free, second-hand sink (If you lived in my neighborhood I could point to two free stainless sinks right now).

Then locate someone who has had experience installing sinks and the associated plumbing (maybe a do-it-yourselfer neighbor, or a shop teacher, or someone in the building trades), and ask them if they would teach you how to do the job (it''s hard to say no to someone who is interested in your area of skill). Maybe you could offer to swap chocolate chip cookies or weekend cat-sitting for the lesson.
Give it a try, it might work.
Belfrybat
#14 Posted : Friday, October 17, 2003 3:02:08 AM
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Posts: 134,494
The divider between the two stainless bowls in the kitchen is rusting. It began with a couple of small spots about a year ago, and now has spread to 6 spots. Didn't even know stainless could rust. The sink is about 6 years old. I used limaway/rust remover, but it doesn't get it all and doesn't protect against further rusting. Any ideas of what I can use to remove the rust with and what can I use to prevent more rust? Perhaps some kind of coating material? Thanks.
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