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Water cisterns Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Wednesday, August 20, 2003 9:38:48 PM
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You might consider using concrete. Thats what they use in alot of city water storage tanks. Not sure how big you want to make it. One thing you will want to do is have the ability to filter the water as most of your contamination in water comes from the rain as it brings the contaminates down from the atmosphere.
You will have one major problem of sulpher dioxide or when mixed in water sulphuric acid or acid rain. It can be filtered out. I don''t think i would use cordwood to build the walls. Your tank should be round instead of square. Square walls are harder to reinforce for stability against pressure from the outside.I am assuming that you want to bury the tank, as that is something I would do.
Steve
majere
#2 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:37:20 AM
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Asha,

Search for ''ferroconcrete''. Many tanks, of any shape, can be made this way. Many articles on the internet on this.

Steve is correct, no cordwood.

And (sorry, Steve!) square is very easy with ferroconcrete. Actually stronger than ''rounding''. But whatever shape thee needs, ferroconcrete is kind.

As for filtration, most of the problem is ''first drops''. Almost all catchment systems have a means to discard the first portions of the fall, for just the reasons Steve stated, and contam from the catchment surfaces (roofing material). Otherwise a simple carbon cartridge filter does the rest. And shop around for the older style filters, the ones that you can break apart and recharge yourself. Well leached wood ash does VERY well.

Thee definately wants to bury, if possible, and still have gravity flow.

Take care,

Majere
skruzich
#3 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 1:23:33 PM
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Thanks Majere, I wasn''t sure on all of this. Ok round isn''t any stronger when using ferro :) hehe.
Oh BTW welcome Home Majere!
steve
ashabean
#4 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 2:08:14 PM
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Thank you both for your responses, I shall start searching on ferroconcrete.
majere
#5 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2003 1:41:28 AM
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Thanks for the welcome back...

Majere.
vger
#6 Posted : Tuesday, September 16, 2003 2:10:52 PM
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In the USVI, cisterns are extremely common. Typically they are sealed with a special material (sorry forgot name) on the walls and the opening is sealed with a rubber type (yuck) compound. Light is to be minimized in there because it promotes various growths. The complex we live in has a monstrous cistern and I was checking it out with the maintenance manager. It was just plain concrete with no sealant but having it saved the complex after hugo blew them out. I have also seen homes that used a steel tank (probably was there when it was built) for a cistern. The tank was bigger than the house. Most homes have the cistern built right into the foundation. Building codes here call for 5 gallons of capacity for each sq. ft of roof.
barbarake
#7 Posted : Monday, October 06, 2003 12:56:50 AM
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I don''t mean to derail the thread but a cistern sounds like a good idea for the future. Since I will be replacing my roof within the next year or so, what would be the best roofing material to use?? Would a metal roof be better than regular shingles or is some other material preferable??
skruzich
#8 Posted : Monday, October 06, 2003 1:58:28 AM
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Metal roof would be better for collecting rainwater. Just make sure you don''t use lead nails to secure the tin.
Lead nails are usually used to secure the tin as they are self sealing.
steve
Marine
#9 Posted : Tuesday, October 07, 2003 9:35:02 PM
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I can''t tell you any helpful hints as I have not yet built my cistern. I do however, have a question for the experts. I read about sending the water from the cistern through a filtration system and then through a UV light tube to kill Bacteria. Could you just mount a UV bulb in the top of your tank and do the whole tank at once?
michaels
#10 Posted : Tuesday, October 07, 2003 9:52:59 PM
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Marine,

Depends on the light. Some can. But such are very expensive. The submurged ones are more effective, but can get silted, and even more expensive. So expensive that in the one case I am aware of did away with the ''central'' above surface dome light, but used the socket to suspend and power a sump pump that sucked from the bottom, passed through a inline light, and sprayed out at the top of the tank. The spray also helped separate the iron that was suspended in the water.

Have you done any water tests to see what is in the water?

Michael.
Marine
#11 Posted : Tuesday, October 07, 2003 10:12:11 PM
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No I have not tested the water, I have not built yet, I will be building soon in North Texas near Paris. I am just trying to plan in advance for my retirement and home building. Are there any tax breaks for using solar power and using devices like cisterns? Where would you find out this type of information?
michaels
#12 Posted : Tuesday, October 07, 2003 11:16:15 PM
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Sorry, I am not in Texas. I would ask the county extension officer about any tax breaks.

Michael.
wmh50
#13 Posted : Thursday, October 09, 2003 8:09:58 AM
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Marine

Look into www.twri.tamu.edu Good ole Texas A&M has a bunch of info there.
Marine
#14 Posted : Thursday, October 09, 2003 5:05:07 PM
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Thanks TAMU is a good bunch. Got some good fire ant fighting information there.
mikeg
#15 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2003 2:28:28 PM
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Another option for your cistern is a recked tanker truck that hauled food grade materials. An example would be a dairy hauler most are stainless steel and can not be repaird if damaged badly. They just take the tank off the truck and install a new one. If you have some one that can weld stainless for you you can put a patch on the inside and then bury it to keep it cool or not.
ashabean
#16 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2003 2:28:28 PM
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I am researching rain catchment systems at the moment, with the thought of putting one in our land.

if we did go ahead with this, we wouldn't really want to use a plastic tank, but would like to consider creating something ourselves.

I'd be really interested to hear peoples's thoughts and experiences of building your own cistern/holding container, and what people think is the best materials to use.

I was also wondering if you could use cordwood to create the walls? is that a really silly idea?(Obviously I know I would need a liner)

We also have LOTS of stone from a collasped drystone wall, could they be used?

Thanks in advance for any insight and experiences.

Asha
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