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I have a question about black-eyed peas Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Sunday, June 08, 2003 1:32:07 PM
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I am wondering if it could have been sevin dust.
StreetLegal
#2 Posted : Sunday, June 08, 2003 4:30:44 PM
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I don''t know...was sevin dust in existence 60 years ago? Maybe it was DDT? [xx(]
pate20135
#3 Posted : Sunday, June 08, 2003 10:23:49 PM
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I was not certain, so I rechecked my Dicks Encyclopedia, Kaolin.

It also recomends Borax. I would not suggest Borax, today. They did not know better in the 1800s.

As for storage, yes, we have a trick. We use cleaned soda bottles. Pack in the goods, grain also works great this way, ''thumb down'' the top, drop a piece of dry ice, and seal. When we want some, we grab a bottle, and cut it open. And cut up pieces go into the injection molder we use for other needs, such as making other storage containers. Another community I know uses the shreded plastic for filler in ''asphalt'' roads.

Pate

skruzich
#4 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2003 4:09:20 AM
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Hehe, Pate, I suppose you have some plans on building a injection molder too i bet ;) I wish i had a way of melting down plastic bottles, I had a idea years ago in taking those bottles and making 2x4''s or 2x6''s for buildings. I think that if you had enough of the plastic poured into a mold it would be strong enough to use. I thought of even making it with slots to put it together Like a tenon joint. Then one could attach materials like gypsum to the wall with screws.
Steve
StreetLegal
#5 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2003 4:27:54 AM
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Thanks Pate,

I tried to find out more info on kaolin...found a number of folks who sell it, but I could never find anyone who could tell me why it would work for my application.

So Pate...Can I impose on you one more time by asking kaolin works to keep out weevils, etc? If I''m not mistaken, my friend said the peas he remembers were stored in a cloth bag, which would not have been air or humidity tight.

Personally, I like the dry ice in the soda bottle idea.

Thanks again.
StreetLegal
#6 Posted : Monday, June 09, 2003 4:30:19 AM
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Pate,

Forgive my ignorance, but what do you mean when you say "thumb down" the top?
pate20135
#7 Posted : Tuesday, June 10, 2003 9:51:54 PM
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StreetLegal,

I am not certain why Kaolin. And this copy of Dicks does not say.

If I had to make a guess, it has something to do with PH.
Blackeyes are acidic.
I remember when Ma Campbell first experimented with the ''seal a meal'' system.
She made blackeyed peas, and sealed, and froze.
When thawed, it was unedible. Acid. Vinegary.
Da Campbell gave her quite a bit of ribbing over that. Some ''off color''.
Kaolin, chemically speaking, is a buffer.
It neutralizes something like twenty times its volume in acid, and something like five in bases.

Another memory is when I was a boy fishing on the Ocumulgee, when the skeeters got too bad, I would hitch a ride on a quarry truck to Huber, where the kaolin mines were, and fish in the quarry, no skeeters there.

Another memory, bugs being ''gummed up'' in kaolin.

Another memory is the vials certain ''sweater'' girls wore around the neck. They had kaolin packed in them, with essence of pennyroyale or rosemary. I used to envy some of the vials.

And there are different types of Kaolin. People say ''fullers earth'' and ''kaolin'' wrongfully. You want ''white fullers'' kaolin. The active ingredient in ''kaopectate'' (spelling), and the clay in ''chinet'' (spelling?) ''translucent'' china ware.

As to ''thumb down'', after you thump the bottles on a counter to pack them, press your thumb or finger in the opening for a little more compacting. Just enough to put the dry ice in.

Pate
skruzich
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 12:36:46 AM
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Hey pate, I used to go fishing down on the ocumulgee. Now, where would i find kaolin? I am thinking that it would be something i could make into a paste or something and rub onto my skin to repel mosquitos. Or will it hurt your skin?
We just got a west nile alert here today, they are saying its going to be really bad this year since we have had LOTS of rain for the first time in 10 years. Supposed to rain all weekend and all next week. our lakes are 5-15 feet over full pool. First time in 10 years.
Going to be a grand fishing year this year ;)
steve
pate20135
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 1:31:54 AM
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As for skeeter repellent, today, I use the essential oil of pennyroyal and of rosemary. Careful though, some people are sensitive.

Huber Georgia is the last large open pit mine I can remember. It has been a few years. (sad smile)

Pate
StreetLegal
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 4:29:25 AM
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Pate,

Thanks for the info...I''ll pass it along to my friend, and will also use this as another chance to rib him about not being internet "connected". :)

DanR
#11 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 1:49:20 PM
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Street:

After I "dry" or dehidrate my beans I vacuum seal them in canning jars. By drying them you cut down on the storage volumn and sealing them in jars under a vacuum will increase the stroage life at least three times over other mentods. I do not put anything in with them as with most of the air being drawn out, all the "bugs" will die off from lack of air. To cook, you just soak over night in water, drain off that water, cover with freah water and cook as normal. Boy are they good in the middle of the winter!
skruzich
#12 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 5:44:08 PM
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Hmmm My cowpeas are about 6" tall now, i can just taste them already. I keep on staring at them lately wishing that they were putting the pods on already. I guess the gardening concept was created by God to teach all of us patience! ;)


Along with my cowpeas i have corn just popping out of the ground, its about 3" and my watermelons are popping up too. Nothing better than picking a home grown watermelon, throwing it in a mountain river on a thursday and letting it chill til saturday and sitting on that riverbank with a campfire and clay packed fish roasting in the coals of the fire, along with some potatoes packed the same way. MmmMMMmmmmmmmmmm
Throw a few crawdads and you have a feast fit for a king.
steve
Sheila
#13 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 6:03:23 PM
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This comment is off on a tangent, but my understanding is that pennyroyal should be avoided by pregnant women. It can stimulate a miscarriage.
skruzich
#14 Posted : Wednesday, June 11, 2003 10:30:40 PM
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You are probably right sheila, Most herbs should be avoided by pregnant women. There are very few herbs that are safe to take during a pregnancy.
pate20135
#15 Posted : Thursday, June 19, 2003 7:03:01 PM
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Sheila,

Maybe so, I would not know. In our culture, when a woman is pregnant, she is automatically on a ''birthing'' diet, supervised by a midwife. No herbs, etc. Quite bland. I have often felt that this was cruel, considering the cravings. There is a large section in one volume here of just such diets, computed by the time of the year, age, etc. We want our children healthy, and have learned some hard lessons. And should the woman cheat, on first offence, she is ''under the ban''. Twice or more, after the birth she will be expelled, and the child up for foster, as she did not show reverence for life. Hey, don''t blast me, this is just the way things are.

take care,

Pate
pate20135
#16 Posted : Thursday, June 19, 2003 7:15:57 PM
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StreetLegal,

Back in Librum, glad to be back, but up to my arse in workmen and mess and ''catchup''.

I did check on why kaolin. To my surprise, there was no reference as to why. Looks like I have ended up with egg on my face again. I know it works, but why? Dunno.

--------

Steve,

Got the email, will reply soonest, just so darn busy.

The kaolin was/is stuffed in ''sniffer'' or vials, hung around the neck. The girls used to put pennyroyal, or other essential oil in it also. More for ''perfume'' than anything else, I suppose, they were not normally allowed perfume, so it was a ''loophole''. I remember one young lady using violet. I remember thinking to myself that if the girl was advertising, she should find a ''fresh bread'' scent, something I would go for... (grin). I don''t recall anyone using it as a paste. I do remember checking to see that the females had their vials, and not spotting them, ''well cradled'' if thee catches my meaning. Oh, the days...

Take care,

Pate
mikeg
#17 Posted : Thursday, June 19, 2003 8:09:27 PM
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I had a frind in alaska that would pick black berrys wash them and dry them put them in a steralized mason jar and then drop an asprin in and they would keep a long time with out any processing.
andydufresne
#18 Posted : Friday, June 20, 2003 12:41:01 AM
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OK a couple of maybe dumb questions.


WHY dry ice?

And how do you get a vaccum on a glass jar? AND is it better than old fashioned canning?

And for Pate....loved that craddling comment.

[:D]


skruzich
#19 Posted : Friday, June 20, 2003 12:51:10 AM
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A vaccuum will occour from the heated jar itself. The inside temperature is expanded air, and will contract when it cools. This essentially will pull the lid down against the jar sealing it. You can create a real vaccuum if you set the jar under a dome or something, like a dome, and have a rubber mat to set the dome on. The rubber mat would need to have a connection through it, to connect to a vaccuum compressor. By sucking all the air out of the dome, you would do the same with the jar. By having a lid on top of the jar, it would naturally raise up off the jar, as the air is sucked out of the chamber. Then when you open the chamber, the air pressure would clamp the lid down ontop of the jar.
steve
andydufresne
#20 Posted : Friday, June 20, 2003 5:53:35 AM
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OK Steve...THAT is the thing my grandmothers did. But DAN R was talking about dehydrated peas. Still the same process only no water in the jar?
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