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building using tires Options
skruzich
#21 Posted : Tuesday, April 29, 2003 5:16:53 PM
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Well I don''t know about no foundation, that won''t be allowed here. I talked with a buddy of mine who is a building inspector and he said that it would not be allowed in my county. They require a footing, thickness based on weight/load of the wall. And at 300lbs per tire (i believe thats the estimate i have heard) times 24 f long, x 10'' high, for one end wall, that would make the total weight just for the tires at, 54,000lbs. Now according to the county i live in that would require me according to code, having a footer that was the width of the tire, 28" and 12" thick. Thats 56 sqft of concrete. or 7 yards of concrete. 7 yards of concrete will pour almost a entire wall 4" thick. which is thick enough for concrete construction. To top that off, at $70.00 per yard thats going to run approximately 490.00 for the concrete alone. Now you can buy cinder blocks for a buck a piece and be 400 dollars ahead building a cinderblock wall including a footer for the wall.
(Labor not included) But lets say it costs you 200 dollars for the block and concrete to lay the block, still its more cost effective this way than by going the other way.
I mean yeah i am all for a mortgage free home, but with this way I just don''t see how this cuts the cost. Also look at how much labor is involved in building this way. 5 years to build a small home? Thats way too long to build on a house. Your project goes through too many environmental changes over that length of time, plus in my county and state, they require you to finish construction of a livable structure within 2 years. That is to prevent people from building a shack and call it construction and avoid taxes and fees.
I love the idea of having free materials. I also checked with the local tire shops, and they told me and this is Georgia now, that they have to count and sign off on each tire they take in under the new laws regulating the disposal of old tires. They charge us 3 bucks a tire when we buy new tires, and to get that three bucks, they have to send the tires off to a approved disposal site. I do know that they take these tires and sell them to companies that make brake pads.

I can pour concrete walls,
arrdavid
#22 Posted : Thursday, May 01, 2003 6:29:41 PM
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I approached our county about building an earthship and surprisingly enough, they will allow a tire wall without a footer. Their explanation was that because you''re building into the side of a hill, you''re bottom course of tires is more than the 36" minimum depth required here. Also, the width of the tire wall justifies a foundation/wall. I didn''t ask about drainage issues though. I''m sure Mike Reynolds has this figured out. Without the concrete issues mentioned by Steve, this is a more than affordable project. As for the time "mortgage free" folks take, this is also an issue in our county. They want projects to be completed in 6 months but I''ve heard you can always get an extension as long as progress is being made. I''m sure a lot of earthships that have gone up were in places where there were no codes in place. There''s a neighboring county here in Colorado that''s like that. As for the cost to dump tires, I''ve charged vehicle shops $1 per tire to collect their tires and they jumped at it. Now I have all of these tires and have decided not to build an earthship because of the time/labor involved. I''ve recently purchased a tire crafting book that shows all sorts of neat stuff to do with tires. It''s just a matter of getting out and doing it.
skruzich
#23 Posted : Thursday, May 01, 2003 8:20:27 PM
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I will check more into it. If i can figure a way to make it cost effective for me to do it I would love to build a garage/shop out of one. You know how these counties are on permits and inspections.
Steve
arrdavid
#24 Posted : Tuesday, May 20, 2003 10:29:00 PM
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Steve,
Sorry it took so long to reply. I''ve been away, taking a solar electric class thru Solar Energy International (SEI). I know that there are permitted earthships here in Montrose County, Colorado. Also, if you go to Mike Reynolds site, www.earthship.org , I''m sure you''ll find plenty of info. Mike has built covenanted small communities of earthships in New Mexico. I know that you can buy blueprints through his site, hopefully he has code things available also.
skruzich
#25 Posted : Wednesday, May 21, 2003 1:57:01 PM
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Hi Arrdavid, Montrose county huh, I used to live up on the black mesa next door to the red canyon and about 1500 feet from the black canyon. Montrose was the closest town to me as the crow flew but i had to go through crawford to get there.
BUt now i live in Georgia.
And I have checked again and the cost to build one of these will exceed the cost to build a traditional stick built house. I found that I MUST pour a footer foundation in order to use these tires. PLUS I have to put rebar every 4 feet with concrete poured into the cavities in order to build "support for the wall. This is according to building inspector. By the time he gets through with all the requirements to have this, It will cost me more than to just pour a concrete wall.
I was hoping that i could do it and build a garage/shop. ;(
Steve
arrdavid
#26 Posted : Friday, May 23, 2003 2:41:15 PM
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Steve,
That''s unfortunate that your inspectors can''t see something that''s been proven. I guess it''s fortunate to you when it comes to the labor involved. Last year, Mother had an article on building a cordwood sauna. This looks so neat to me, I imagine you could do the same thing for a garage/shop. I''m not sure what the timber industry is like in Georgia. All I know is that it is way too humid for me there. I''m originally from Nashville, TN. Since moving out west (25 years ago), I can only visit my family in the Fall and Winter because of the heat along with the humidity. I would have had a tough time thinking of moving out of this wonderful state of Colorado.
skruzich
#27 Posted : Friday, May 23, 2003 3:04:26 PM
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I sure miss colorado. It was a wonderful place to live. But I couldn''t make a living there back then with a family with 5 kids. Cordwood here won''t last because of termites and the wood rots too fast. We have a massive timber industry mostly pulpwood and lumber, as GA pacific and southern Pacific and several other timber companies own most of the land around here for growing pine. They just got through harvesting 10,000 acres across the road from me last year.
Well at least it only happens once every 10 15 years.
Whats a crying shame is that they even sell rock around here for a fortune. It cost about 25 dollars a ton for granite, and it goes way up if you get river rock and shale rock and any kind of sandstone or limestone. I mean if i had a means to get at the rock i could build out of that for the walls.
And its illegal to pick up the rock through the mountain passes. I mean i am currently bidding on a job just to remove the materials and get this, I have to PAY the contractor money to remove the material. Isn''t that a turn of events.
FilthyK
#28 Posted : Monday, June 16, 2003 3:58:15 PM
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Man, Steve, reading about your problems in North Georgia, I have to say two things...

1) I lived there for 7 years back in the 90''s and on 2 occasions, I attemtped to buy a house and could not do so. From what you''ve posted, I am glad I didn''t settle there...

2) How much difference is there between the counties as far as building codes go? When I lived in Acworth, I lived in the Cobb county section (30101 zip code), but I kept a PO box at an Acworth Post Office extension in the Cherokee county (30102 zip). I registered and insured my vehicle through the PO box and managed to save mucho dinero doing so.

I don''t know what county you''re in, but I would think building standards would''nt be the same for, say, Cobb or Fulton versus Bartow or Paulding, eh bubba! [:D]
skruzich
#29 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2003 3:31:11 AM
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Posts: 134,494
I finally got a inspector to seriously take a look at cordwood construction mixed with stackblock construction. I will let yall know what happens.
steve
cordwoodguy
#30 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2003 12:36:15 AM
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JUST A THOUGHT ABOUT EARTHSHIP FILLING....A 26" OUTSIDE DIAMETER OF THE TIRE FILLED WITH DIRT WOULD GIVE YOU AN R-VALUE OF ABOUT R=2.6.BUT IF THEY USED SAWDUST AND LIME IN THE PROPORTIONS OF 1 PART LIME TO 10 PARTS SAWDUST.THEN COMPACTED IT ...YOU WOULD GET A MUCH HIGHER R-VALUE.PLUS THE LIME SETS UP THE SAWDUST WHEN MOISTURE IS PRESENT.IT SETS ALMOST LIKE A FOAM BOARD.THE LIME HAS PREVENTED THE SAWDUST FROM ROTTING IN CORDWOOD HOUSES 25+ YEARS OLD.THROW IN SOME BORAX AS A FIRE PROOFING AGENT IF YOU HAVE SOME CONCERNS. ANOTHER THOUGHT,HOW ABOUT MIXING THE DIRT AND STYROFOAM BEADS TO GET A HIGHER R-VALUE.WHAT ABOUT USING SLAG FROM A STEEL MILL? JUST ABOUT ANYTHING WOULD BEAT DIRT.
CORDWOOD MORTAR WITH SAWDUST WOULD DOUBLE THE R-VALUE BUT WOULD BE COST PROHIBITIVE.
PEOPLE ON MY BOARD HAVE TOLD ME THAT INSPECTORS HAVE ASKED THEM FOR THE R-VALUE OF A CORDWOOD WALL [TO MEET CODE].CONVENTIONAL LOG BUILDINGS IN MANITOBA WERE STOPPED BY AN INSPECTOR BECAUSE THEY COULDN`T MEET CODE YEARS AGO.HOW DO EARTHSHIPS MEET CODE ACCEPTANCE ON THE INSULATION R-VALUE THEY HAVE? WHY WOULDN`T AN EARTHSHIP HAVE A THERMAL NOSE BLEED? JUST CURRIOUS!





CORDWOODGUY
terry123
#31 Posted : Friday, June 27, 2003 12:36:15 AM
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Posts: 134,494
Hi, my husband and I are thinking about building a retreat out of
tires/dirt/plaster. has anyone done that out there? Is there dangers
using tires? such as toxity? etc. Thanks ahead for any info you have. [:)]
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