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Bermuda grass removal Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Thursday, June 12, 2003 1:20:42 PM
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OMG folks around here pay BIG BUCKs to get bermuda grass. I know if you shade it it dies real fast.
StreetLegal
#2 Posted : Thursday, June 12, 2003 9:50:08 PM
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Steve, you are right about shade.

A friend of mine pulled a rubber bed protector out of his pickup and left it laying in his front yard for maybe two days. Between the blocked light and (possibly) the "cooking" effect from the heat, the bermuda was severly stunted. It took many weeks for that area of his lawn to come back.

I don''t advise Roundup. Among other things, it seems to be volatile, at least for a short period after you spray it. It could damage or kill the desireable plants around where you sprayed.

Find some black plastic that won''t let light through and it should at least stop the spread of the grass.

Good luck.

---

Steve, what is "OMG"?
fahrah63
#3 Posted : Friday, June 13, 2003 2:21:37 AM
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Appreciate the input from Steve and Streetlegal. True, bermuda will not tolerate shade - but the darn root system (rhizomes) continue growing like crazy underground in most cases. Ever dig up a shovelful of bermuda grass? Two-thirds root system and one third dirt. I have seen a three-foot sprig growing across a scrap of old carpet in one of my garden walkways and longer ones beneath the carpet (whitish-yellow, but still full of life). Shade in Oklahoma is at a premium with shade cloth running a buck fifty per running foot. Full sun in this area is about three to four hours if following gardening guides from the northeast.
StreetLegal''s comments about Roundup are certainly accurate. Just the tiny droplets from the spray will just about knock a tree down. However, Roundup is about the only chemical approved by most gardening "experts." Heavy black plastic, unless welded to the ground, will become giant sails with the first storm - winds of 50 to 80 mph are all too common. Lift a large section up that did not fly away and you will count a dozen snakes before you jump the fence.
mikeg
#4 Posted : Friday, June 13, 2003 2:30:06 PM
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Posts: 134,494
I was fortunate to be responsible for the roof asset management for the company I work for and had access to some of the removed EPDM roofing (rubber) I use it for all kinds of things and killing folage and grass is one of them. This stuff is about an 1/8" thick and extremely heavy. I have had a piece spread out for a year killing the grass in a future construction site and it hasn''t moved. If you see a comercial roofing company setting up to replace a roof on a large building with a flat roof, talk to the super and see if they are saving the old roof for some one and if not see if they will drop you what you need instead of sending it to the dump. Just don''t ask for sheets that are to large it''s heavy and hard to man handel 20 x 20 is to heavy for one person to carry you can drag it but that''s about it.
I have it down between my rased beds, in my crawel space on the cabin, I use it to cover farm machinery that sets out, keep fire wood dry and a lot of people use it to cover round bales of hay. I am in the process of building a lake and will use it under the rock on the overflow to keep it from washing out. I got some for a friend and he used it to build a water garden/fish pond in his yard. Just real useful stuff to have around and free for the hauling in most places.
mikeg
#5 Posted : Friday, June 13, 2003 2:38:37 PM
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Posts: 134,494
There is another by product of these roof removals if it not reused, they use a large round river rock as a ballast to hold it down on the roofs. If the are going to put down another rubber roof lots of time they move it to one side and put down new rubber and then put the rock back. Some tomes they go with a different type of roof and have to remove it from the site. The larger roofing companies have a large vacuum unit that they use to sweep it up and into a dump truck. If they don''t have a buyer for it you can park your truck or trailer and they will load you out with all you can carry. I am using it for my septic system and have also used it to landscape with as well. Dosn''t make a good drive way, to round.
fahrah63
#6 Posted : Friday, June 13, 2003 2:38:37 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Bermuda grass grows thick in my part of Oklahoma. Gardens are covered over in a matter of weeks. Root systems creep through, over, under, and around anything placed in their way. Anyone out there have some process, material, or procedure for killing this monster in the garden area?
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