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Need info on keeping chickens in Alaska Options
skruzich
#1 Posted : Monday, September 08, 2003 4:10:52 PM
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hmmmmm I think you can. Chickens are pretty hearty. Might need to knit them a mukluk or something. (don''t know where i got mukluk from) ;)
I would say it would depend on how cold it is going to get in the winter time, you might want to have a heated house for the colder months.
I remember my grandpa having chickens in temps as low as 15 degrees, they just huddle together plus i think thier down under the feathers gets thicker when the weather starts to get colder.
Steve
majere
#2 Posted : Tuesday, September 09, 2003 1:38:49 AM
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I have an old reference about a tar papered chicken tractor with electrical hookup for heat lamps inside, in middle Canada. So, yes is possible. As for ''free range'', the exposed legs, wattles, beaks, etc would suffer frostbite in less than a minate, I would think. I also have a note of ''chicken houses'', old abandoned houses, with wood burning stove still intact, shared by communities to winter fowl. I also have a reference about using old school buses and gutted trailers.

And Steve is correct about ''feather thickening'', but there are still the exposed parts.

Take care,

Majere
patrick46135
#3 Posted : Tuesday, September 09, 2003 2:15:07 AM
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Your biggest problem will probably be predators. From a few folks I''ve talked to who live in Alaska, they all say that their number one problem is bears.
patrick46135
#4 Posted : Tuesday, September 09, 2003 2:21:20 AM
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[:I]
Forgot to add about the cold issue.

We have had chickens survive 0 degree temps with negative wind chills for a week at a time with no major frostbite issues. They live in an unheated henhouse and will walk in snow up to their bellies during sunny milder days(around 20-30 degrees). My biggest problem was keeping them in water and having eggs freeze and crack in the nest.
skruzich
#5 Posted : Tuesday, September 09, 2003 9:51:03 PM
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I would think that if one would build a chicken coop at the south end of a bank, and build back into the bank some or even put up a cordwood coop, you could eliminate their freezing problem. They can go inside and get warm. Plus their combigned body heat will help too.
Now as far as going outside I would say that is a toughie. knit them some leg warmers, and mufflers to wrap around their necks???
I don''t know, but folks must be doing it, as I am sure they don''t do without chicken up there for dinner or eggs either.
Steve
majere
#6 Posted : Tuesday, September 09, 2003 11:25:23 PM
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Dug out the old reference. It was more concerned with building up the garden areas using chicken tractors than keeping them alive. According to it, the idea was to have the tractor, and rotate it between three garden plots on an annual basis. Each year, at thaw, mulch in the droppings, and move the tractor to next plot. A rotating system. Plot one would have the tractor, plot two would be the composting plot, and plot three the garden.

As for preditors, that is another good point with tractors.

Take care,

Majere
skruzich
#7 Posted : Wednesday, September 10, 2003 12:11:00 AM
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uhhhmmm majere, i think those herbs are doing something to you! When did a tractor have a preditor, and i have never heard of a chicken tractor. How do you start them? Maybe by a pullet??? hehehe
steve
majere
#8 Posted : Wednesday, September 10, 2003 1:08:14 AM
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(chuckling).

For shame, again, Steve. Go back and read your Mother!

Chicken tractors are roll around chicken coops. With wire bottoms. Think of rabbit hutches on wheels for chickens. The ''fertilizer'' falls through. And the wire protects from preditors.

(still chuckling)(thanks, I needed that!)
skruzich
#9 Posted : Wednesday, September 10, 2003 1:56:11 AM
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Majere, I know what your talking about ;P have that issue sitting in my magazine pile right here. Just couldn''t resist pulling your LEG ;)

I am in a wierd mood tonight, pure corn coming right out of me.
steve
mikeg
#10 Posted : Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:57:50 PM
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Ask around and see if anyone in the area is raising chickens. You will probably need a source up there as there are probably no hatcheries near.
mckenzy_girl
#11 Posted : Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:57:50 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Is it possible to keep chickens in Alaska over the winter?
1. Do you need a heated chicken coop?

2. Do you let them "free range" ?

3.Is this a hopeless thing, to think one can keep chickens near Fairbanks, Alaska?

Can any Alaskans give me any info on keeping chickens?
Thanks so much!
Have a great day [:)]

mckenzygirl [:)]
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