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chickens and oil Options
pate20135
#21 Posted : Thursday, July 10, 2003 3:12:16 AM
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Andy
Hmmm...
But soap would be just as bad as oil, for bird feed.
I bet it did catch the fleas!

Steve,
Slip him some muscodine wine, that Tex-Mex would never know the difference. (grin) Besides, he would enjoy that more.
Now, if thee can locate mulberries. No, that would be wrong, I remember my first encounter with wine, it was mulberry. Best not. Still, it was delicious.

Who says it has to be YOUR land? Maybe things are different, but we plant trees on the lands surrounding ours. Erosion control and the like. The neighbors have no objections. They like it! Normally oaks. Pecans are not native here. Actually, here, if land next to yours is undeveloped, thee can encroach fifteen feet with ''natural'' hedging, if thee matches on thy side.

As to the man with the pecan trees, I would bet that they really made their money with leeching the tannin from the ''bad'' pecans. Which reminds me, I have to do the annual survey of our acorn trees. Tomorrow. And take the kids with me. A ''walk in the woods''.

Take care,

Pate


StreetLegal
#22 Posted : Thursday, July 10, 2003 4:00:59 PM
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Pate, you''re right...I wouldn''t know the difference. Good wine is wasted on me...beer and Crown Royal whiskey is a different story!

I''m interested in learning more about leaching tannin from pecans. I have 90 large pecan trees.

I''m sure I''ll get screamed at when I say this, but I haven''t harvested any pecans in five years. They were laying on the ground, many of last year''s are still in the trees. Two days ago, I ran the disc over the entire orchard and turned all the old pecans under.

In anticipation of questions and possible criticism, I''ll go ahead and explain why I haven''t harvested any nuts lately: there ain''t no money in it!! (That''s the short answer.)

The long answer is:

It takes a lot of time to harvest them by hand.

It takes a lot of money to own harvesting equipment.

It takes very smooth ground for harvesting equipment to work properly.

Custom harvesters get to the "small guys" last, if ever.

I have at least two varieties of pecan, which causes processing problems.

There are always people coming by that want to pick pecans for a percentage, but they are scroungy, dirty people I don''t know and don''t trust. I simply don''t want those people around my place.

Galeshka
#23 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 6:57:39 PM
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skruzich, I have recipes for blackberry, blackberry-apple, and honeysuckle wines, among others...including (yuck!) parsnip wine. My husband makes several different wines and brought all of his recipes over with him from Scotland, most of them he has converted to our measures so I can help him make them.

Be well........
skruzich
#24 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 9:57:12 PM
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hmmmm I have a tree full of persimmons, i wonder if i can make a wine or brandy out of them. :P I have 3 gallons of blackberries left but thought i would keep them for cobblers this year. BUTT The muscidines are in now. I prefer the muscidine wine myself ;)
Got both too, red and the white variety. I am fixing to go pick them and make some jam out of them.
Also you can make hull pie out of the hulls.
steve
Galeshka
#25 Posted : Thursday, August 21, 2003 10:44:43 PM
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Steve, I will check on the wine but I do know you can make a beer with persimmons and honey locust pods...just make layers of them in a wooden barrel and add a small amount of water to begin the process of liquifying. Thank you for the welcome btw :-D.

Be well......
Galeshka
#26 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2003 11:19:24 PM
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Posts: 134,494
On the bugs..perhaps their bodies (carcii??LOL) could be rinsed in water a couple of times before feeding the birds? If not, could they not be disposed of in the incinerator?

Be well...
majere
#27 Posted : Saturday, August 23, 2003 11:56:55 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Missed this thread. Coming back to it.

Street, on the tannin from pecan shells, there are different types of pecans, even though the botanical name is the same. When dry are the shells bitter to taste? No, I am not talking about the husk. If so, then there be tannin there. The process is simple, simply soak them in water, then boil down the water to get the tannin.

We did build Saxons ''fly farm''. Again, I say his food figures are off, but do those things produce! We are getting about a quart of dead flies a day, from a twelve by twelve by twelve enclosure. The chickens love them. Not enough for full feeding of the flocks, but every feed ''stretcher'' helps.

As to the traps, we are still using them. We will be putting some of the dead back into the fly farm to see if that can create a ''cycle''.

Take care,

Majere
williamsson
#28 Posted : Wednesday, September 03, 2003 3:18:22 PM
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Posts: 134,494
fyi, in case you''re burning to know, the exoskeletons of "bugs" are made from a polymer molecule called chitin (the "ch" is pronounced as "k"); anyway, it''s what makes up crab shells and the shells of other crustaceans; there''s already a huge international market for it in the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries; I''ve read recently that researchers have found that chitin applied to burns and cuts promotes wound healing (but DON''T go rubbing beetle shells on yourself!); some company is now making bandages impregnated with pharmaceutical grade chitin. . .
majere
#29 Posted : Wednesday, September 03, 2003 10:53:57 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Thanks, Williamsson.

And to update the earlier. When we reintroduced the ''oiled'' bugs to the fly farm, it nearly killed off the fly farm. Scratch that.

We have now a small battery powered fan trap. It is nothing more an a UV LED, in front of a battery fan, with the exhaust of the fan going into a linen bag. Drawback is that the critters are live, and one good sized bug will jam the fan.

Majere
skruzich
#30 Posted : Wednesday, September 03, 2003 11:59:21 PM
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Posts: 134,494
Is the endoskeleton chitin the same thing that some are selling as chitosan in some of the fat burning formulas??
steve
pate20135
#31 Posted : Wednesday, September 03, 2003 11:59:21 PM
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Posts: 134,494

It is not often I get stumped, but sometimes...

Lead up to question.

Members of our enclave use a very effective bug trap. It is nothing more than a pan of water with a light edible oil skim with a UV light overhead. Each morning one goes out, skims the bug carcasses off into a covered pail, and it is reset for the next night. Very effective.

Now, we are starting to have a disposal problem.

So I was asked if there was anything about letting the chickens dine on the remains. In my research I found no references to what such oil would do to the chicken, if anything. Some use soybean oil, some use vegetable oil.

So, what can I expect, other than shiney feathers, if we were to let the chickens have the bugs?

Take care,

Pate
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